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Nimravis

Ordovician Collecting Day 3- St. Leon, Indiana

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Plantguy

Quite the haul-thanks for all the pictures!

Regards, Chris 

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Fossildude19

Excellent report and pictures!

This is the kind of immersive report that really makes me feel like I am along for the fun and adventure. :) 

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Monica

Great finds (as usual!), Ralph!  I think my favourite this time is the hash plate below, because I think I see a Leptaena brachiopod on it???

IMG_5776.jpg.1a137b7331ea2fe3812b7f04b6efa765.jpg

:wub:

Thanks for sharing your adventure with us!!!

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FossilDAWG

Very nice report.  That is also one of my favorite sites.  I tend to spend too much time on the "trilobite layer" ("butter shale") and so don't get to search the other layers as much.  There are some rare crinoids, trilobites, and coiled cephalopods that are on my wish list that keep me coming back whenever I'm in the vicinity.

 

I'm always amazed at the productivity of the "trilobite layer".  I crawled that on hands and knees about a month ago and found five complete rollers.  All it takes is a good rain and the site is replenished.

 

BTW the large horn corals are Grewingkia canadensis.  Geniculograptus typicalis is a graptolite.

 

Don

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digit

Spectacular report, Ralph!

 

I have fond memories of this site which we visited several years back as a side trip when we were up in Chicago. While poking around there we had visitors who showed up and were fossil hunting as well. This turned out to be a chance meeting with forum member @Mediospirifer and her significant other. Diane knows this formation well and can answer your ID questions above. Within 5 minutes of searching the roadcut, I had a nice flexi-roller. As that had been so easy and immediate, I (momentarily) had visions (delusions, really) of filling a bag with these--it was the only one I found all day. :P

 

I can spin around in the chair in my office and see across the room a nice big hash plate packed to the gills with brachiopods, bryozoans, and even some Isotelus bits. I was greedy and picked up several nice hash plates which have been distributed to friends and family and have even appeared in a few forum auctions over the years (my extended friend base). ;) The only one I kept is the big hefty one in my office. As it had nice views on both sides of the hash plate I used a rented paver saw with a diamond blade to slice a nice straight edge along one side of the plate so that it stands up nicely for display. Most tile saws only have the blade extend less than half an inch from the table and as such are useless for cutting a 2 inch thick block of hash plate. When I have collected enough items that would benefit from some slicing (including colorful rocks for my tumbler), I rent one of these paver saws from a local rental company and do it Saturday morning to get the extra day of rental for free (most rental places are closed on Sunday). This tool with the large overhead saw blade on a sliding track makes quick work of trimming plates and shaping jaspers, agates, or other pretty stones before they hit the tumbler.

 

Thanks for the memories of a place that indeed should be high on the list of anybody who loves fossils (especially Ordovician).

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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FossilNerd

My goodness! Some great finds and a great report! For some reason I have a fondness for horn coral, and you found some nice ones. :drool: :wub:

 

@Tidgy's Dad will be here shortly to drool over the brachiopods. ;) 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Wow you make these reports so beautifully detailed, I love it. It's almost as if we were actually there!

Very nice haul, especially the cephalopods and trilobites!

-Christian

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Nimravis
2 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

BTW the large horn corals are Grewingkia canadensis.  Geniculograptus typicalis is a graptolite.

Lol- I had all kinds of names written down last night and I was beat and knew it started with a “G” and typed that one, I will have to double check that I put the correct name down for the graptolites the day before.

 

and you are correct about the trilobite layer, it was the last thing that I hit and I found the Flexi’s in abut 25 minutes all within 5 feet of each other. I waited until the end brought knew if I found some first, then I may have just stayed there.

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Nimravis
1 hour ago, digit said:

I used a rented paver saw

Thanks for the comments Ken and I will need to look into this. Because of the limitations with the tile saw I only take thin pieces, but like you know, those can be found at this site.

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Nimravis
3 hours ago, FossilNerd said:

My goodness! Some great finds and a great report! For some reason I have a fondness for horn coral, and you found some nice ones. :drool: :wub:

 

@Tidgy's Dad will be here shortly to drool over the brachiopods. ;) 

Thanks and yes Adam would be in heaven at this site.

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Nimravis
58 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Wow you make these reports so beautifully detailed, I love it. It's almost as if we were actually there!

Very nice haul, especially the cephalopods and trilobites!

-Christian

Thanks Christian, that is what I attempt to do, I like seeing members fossils, but I really like seeing the collecting area and the fossils as they are found. 

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Nimravis
11 hours ago, Monica said:

Great finds (as usual!), Ralph!  I think my favourite this time is the hash plate below, because I think I see a Leptaena brachiopod on it???

IMG_5776.jpg.1a137b7331ea2fe3812b7f04b6efa765.jpg

:wub:

Thanks for sharing your adventure with us!!!

 

 

Yes Monica, that is one on the lower left of the plate and I think there is another one poking out right below it.

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Mark Kmiecik

Popcorn's almost all gone now. I'm gonna hafta get some more. Again, thank you for the most enjoyable post. Your trips are fun and informative. The photos are stunning. The sites you visit are amazing. Thank you.

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Mediospirifer

Nice post! I love visiting St. Leon, although Mr. Spirifer tends to get focused on finding TRILOBITES!!! (and was disappointed this spring in that search).

 

The tiny brachiopods that are all over the butter shale layer are Zygospira modesta. They are little beauties! I've collected a few hundred in my once-a-year visits, and I can't seem to refrain from picking up more.

 

I'm not sure of ID's on your other pieces with consulting my reference book. You do have some gorgeous pieces!

 

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Peat Burns
18 hours ago, Nimravis said:

I believe that this is an Eochonetes-

 

IMG_5840.jpg.45ee5882731ff90191b9b44944d54a11.jpg

 

I think this one is Strophomena.

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Nimravis
4 hours ago, erose said:

Also, nice to see others using Theodolite. Just be careful not to post coordinates for sites that are private or otherwise should be guarded.

 

There are two common horn corals in the Cincinnatian. One is the large Grewengkia canadensis that you have many of. The other, and often overlooked, coral is Streptelasma divaricans. They are much smaller and always have an attachment scar. They also sometimes occur in sweet little clusters.  I've known folks to ignore them thinking they were just tiny Grewengkia.

Yes- I would not post coordinates for private land.

 

Thanks for all the info on my finds- I am not a true Ordovician collector, I just like collecting.

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Nimravis
3 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

Popcorn's almost all gone now. I'm gonna hafta get some more. Again, thank you for the most enjoyable post. Your trips are fun and informative. The photos are stunning. The sites you visit are amazing. Thank you.

Thanks Mark

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Nimravis
59 minutes ago, Peat Burns said:

I think this one is Strophomena.

Lol- that’s what I get for trying to ID this stuff, I should just post the pics and say “Look what I found” and if it something interesting, someone would tell me.

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