Jump to content
markjw

A visit to Erindale area

Recommended Posts

markjw

I visited Etobicoke Creek, and, as usual, the place was packed with fossils. Then I went to Credit River...a park near "The Riverwood Conservancy". At first I was disappointed, but in one place I found 3 little corals that had been packed into a mud path by hiker's boots. Here they are; all approximately 4 cm across.

 

 

aCoral42.jpg

aCoralsCreditRiver-45.jpg

aCreditRiverCoral46.jpg

aCreditRiverCoral47.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darktooth

Those are pretty nice finds!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monica

Those are really nice - congrats!

 

PS - Bill Hessin's book (2009) has two colonial rugose corals listed: Favistina (which is most common in the Georgian Bay Formation compared with other formations in south-central Ontario - maybe this is the one you have?) and Palaeophyllum.  This book lists the following tabulate corals: Lichenaria, Tetradium, Paleoalveolites, Foerstephyllum, and Protaraea.

 

@FossilDAWG will likely be able to help with identification :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG

All three corals belong to Favestina calcina (Nicholson, 1874).  I explained the history of the name, and the coral fauna of the Streetsville exposures, in an earlier post here.  Nice finds!

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark Kmiecik

Nice corals. I like corals. Thanks for the photos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
markjw
22 hours ago, Darktooth said:

Those are pretty nice finds!

Nice of you to say!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
markjw
6 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

Nice corals. I like corals. Thanks for the photos.

My pleasure. I hope to find more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
markjw
9 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

All three corals belong to Favestina calcina (Nicholson, 1874).  I explained the history of the name, and the coral fauna of the Streetsville exposures, in an earlier post here.  Nice finds!

 

Don

That is a very useful post; thank you. Your narrative was most intriguing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
markjw
12 hours ago, Monica said:

Those are really nice - congrats!

 

PS - Bill Hessin's book (2009) has two colonial rugose corals listed: Favistina (which is most common in the Georgian Bay Formation compared with other formations in south-central Ontario - maybe this is the one you have?) and Palaeophyllum.  This book lists the following tabulate corals: Lichenaria, Tetradium, Paleoalveolites, Foerstephyllum, and Protaraea.

 

@FossilDAWG will likely be able to help with identification :)

Thanks M.

I'll be eager to consult Hessin's book shortly, but it will be less entertaining than 'Dawg's analysis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×