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connorp
13 hours ago, deutscheben said:

That is a very cool tooth! I love the color and the unusual stippling pattern. I don't think it is Peripristis, as it does not look like any of the examples I have seen. But I don't know what it is- there are a number of Pennsylvanian genera with a similar low jagged ridge shape, like Chomatodus, or Venustodus... perhaps @Archie or @Elasmohunter or one of our other Carboniferous tooth folks have an idea?

Yeah I was definitely spitballing on the ID. I have very little knowledge about chondrichthyans, but these teeth are quickly becoming my new fascination.

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connorp

Here's another cool find, which I only recognized thanks to @deutscheben's recent trip report from here as well. A nice association of a crushed brachiopod with spines attached and a crushed Archaeocidaris urchin. At first I thought only isolated spines were present but it appears that the test is partially present as well.

IMG_7089.thumb.jpg.d63dd34a47921a6448cd9891b51c4eec.jpg 5da93ea7a9c4a_IMG_70882.thumb.jpg.83fc4f10aac66229f28ea478825feccd.jpg

 

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JohnJ

Could you point out the parts you are attributing to Archaeocidaris

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connorp
On 10/18/2019 at 1:27 AM, JohnJ said:

Could you point out the parts you are attributing to Archaeocidaris

The leftmost spine on the bottom certainly looks like an Acrchaeocidaris spine to me. That said, I'm not longer sure if there's any more to it. None of the other spines display any sort of protrusions, and what I first through was the test may just be conspicuously placed debris. I'm going to try and prep it out a bit more.

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connorp
On 10/17/2019 at 1:38 AM, connorp said:

Turned out to be a spectacularly gorgeous shark tooth. Only a partial, but I'm still ecstatic. Not sure on the ID, maybe Peripristis?

 

IMG_7080.thumb.jpg.e912cd2fcec8084c99661a77add03be7.jpg IMG_7081.thumb.jpg.deec5a12fe5ca38bf2a41351001febf9.jpg

I believe I found an ID on this guy – Cymatodus oblongus. It was described from a single tooth in the Geological Survey of Illinois Vol. 4.

c1.thumb.png.e12e8a6cd25efdd7e6d1a5f8f970dab3.png c2.png.bb81c197f43f2929a0a3aaba91359df8.png (Figure 7a)

 

Here is a related tooth Paracymatodus from the Pennsylvanian of Russia (Handbook of Paleoichthyology Vol. 3D). The stippling pattern is very similar to mine.

IMG_7105.thumb.jpeg.2e8906da941e2b88a5e4c400e0c20a35.jpeg

 

 

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JohnJ
42 minutes ago, connorp said:

The leftmost spine on the bottom certainly looks like an Acrchaeocidaris spine to me. That said, I'm not longer sure if there's any more to it. None of the other spines display any sort of protrusions, and what I first through was the test may just be conspicuously placed debris. I'm going to try and prep it out a bit more.

 

It hard to see detail in the photos, but in general, Archaeocidaris spines are more 'saw-like' than branching.  This looks more like a possible fragmented bryozoan or brachiopod spine to me.

 

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deutscheben
1 hour ago, connorp said:

I believe I found an ID on this guy – Cymatodus oblongus. It was described from a single tooth in the Geological Survey of Illinois Vol. 4.

c1.thumb.png.e12e8a6cd25efdd7e6d1a5f8f970dab3.png c2.png.bb81c197f43f2929a0a3aaba91359df8.png (Figure 7a)

 

Here is a related tooth Paracymatodus from the Pennsylvanian of Russia (Handbook of Paleoichthyology Vol. 3D). The stippling pattern is very similar to mine.

IMG_7105.thumb.jpeg.2e8906da941e2b88a5e4c400e0c20a35.jpeg

 

 

Very intriguing, that does look like a close match indeed! Good research on that one- if correct, that seems like a rather rare genus. 

 

Regarding the spine, it is hard to tell at that level of magnification, but I do think I see the branching @JohnJ was referring to- under magnification are these seeming projections more apparent? 

 

Inked5da93ea7a9c4a_IMG_70882.thumb.jpg.83fc4f10aac66229f28ea478825feccd_LI.thumb.jpg.b231f4e0fe3d4a1fb9d017cff01bfbd7.jpg

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Archie

Awesome finds! That tooth is gorgeous!

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connorp

Here’s one of the nicer Maquoketa hash plates cleaned up a bit with vinegar.

1F7BA08F-6418-4EF4-A5C6-7201E1AB0486.thumb.jpeg.7b33958296a3ccf660bfc39ea09a0346.jpeg

 

There is this one bit that caught my eye. Seems similar to the Isotelus bits I’ve collected from St. Leon. Thoughts?

3A039C5F-DE39-4E84-A4F2-647947B26A31.thumb.jpeg.c7bb4a7e3b359a1a4bfe8dd211d4de10.jpeg

 

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minnbuckeye
3 hours ago, connorp said:

 Isotelus bits

That is my impression. And the Maquoketa in my area is full of Isotelus.

 

 Mike

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Al Tahan

Awesome collecting Conner! Love the hash plates :wub:

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Elasmohunter

Awesome finds! I'm jealous. :)

 

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connorp

Made a second trip to hunt the Maquoketa two weeks ago. Didn’t stay long due to the high water and piles of leaves.

AF7F67AE-64AD-4D50-B5C6-97440DEADD27.thumb.jpeg.e93a50cd6f7d7b56096fa8b346fd1af1.jpeg

 

This was a nice find for me. A nearly complete Isotelus hypostome.

9C068103-342E-4B81-8719-C060788AC36F.thumb.jpeg.47c98809534a366be8f42f6ac40a379e.jpeg

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