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Globidens alabamaensis


Mikrogeophagus

Globidens alabamaensis, NSR

Campanian, Cretaceous

Mar, 2023

 

A shell-crushing mosasaur not uncommon for the NSR. They first showed up in the Early Cretaceous, shortly after the disappearance of ptychodus from the seas.

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From the album:

Ozan Formation

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Photo Information

  • Taken with Apple iPhone 11
  • Focal Length 4.3 mm
  • Exposure Time 1/122
  • f Aperture f/1.8
  • ISO Speed 64

Recommended Comments

Nice find!

I am confused, though.  I have collected Ptychodus mortoni from the Tombigbee Sand in Alabama, which is Upper Santonian-Lower Campanian.  I believe the genus went extinct in the Santonian, which is very definitely Late Cretaceous.  So something is off about Globidens alabamaensis appearing after the disappearance of Ptychodus in the Early Cretaceous.

 

Don

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pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

Posted

11 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

Nice find!

I am confused, though.  I have collected Ptychodus mortoni from the Tombigbee Sand in Alabama, which is Upper Santonian-Lower Campanian.  I believe the genus went extinct in the Santonian, which is very definitely Late Cretaceous.  So something is off about Globidens alabamaensis appearing after the disappearance of Ptychodus in the Early Cretaceous.

 

The genus Globidens is supposed to have been around from the Turonian to Maastrichtian stages of the Late Cretaceous. So, indeed, the statement of them appearing as of the Santonian would appear to be incorrect...

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Mikrogeophagus

Posted

2 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

Nice find!

I am confused, though.  I have collected Ptychodus mortoni from the Tombigbee Sand in Alabama, which is Upper Santonian-Lower Campanian.  I believe the genus went extinct in the Santonian, which is very definitely Late Cretaceous.  So something is off about Globidens alabamaensis appearing after the disappearance of Ptychodus in the Early Cretaceous.

 

Don

Sorry that was a typo on my part. I meant Early Campanian and not Cretaceous. Good catch

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Mikrogeophagus

Posted

1 hour ago, pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon said:

The genus Globidens is supposed to have been around from the Turonian

Wow I had not heard that the genus was that old. I was under the impression they only began in the Campanian. Do they have any species named for the stages before then?

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pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

Posted

4 hours ago, EPIKLULSXDDDDD said:

Wow I had not heard that the genus was that old. I was under the impression they only began in the Campanian. Do they have any species named for the stages before then?

 

Not sure, as my statement was going off of Wikipedia, which mentions the genus as being around from 84.9 Ma. This means my earlier mention of Turonian was in error - which makes sense considering any of the more derived mosasaur genera only came about in the Santonian. Seems the same was the case for Globidens, which would have arisen somewhere in the Late Santonian, if Wikipedia is to be believed. So I'd say your indication of Early Campanian is correct after all...

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