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  1. Blair County Pennsylvania (USA) (Private property) ..... Recently I explored some heaps of old mine talus which I think is the whitish sandstone from the Pottsville Formation. These rocks commonly have imprints in various degree of detail, especially cordaites and lycopods. The pics below show one large boulder with what I think is a very large imprint of sigillaria. The tape shows 8 feet. I'll readily admit that I'm a noob and susceptible to seeing what I want to see. From my pics someone who knows 'way more than I will ever learn opined the "ridges" ar
  2. From the Atrasado Formation in San Diego Canyon, New Mexico. Took a couple of younger friends fossil hunting, and we found a good bed. This one's a real beauty. My photographic equipment is primitive and doesn't do it justice. Graptolites and something else. Not sure what the circular structures are; I don't have the equipment for proper microphotography. There is a very clear echinoderm plate elsewhere in the sample so I'm wondering if these are some kind of echinoderm. They're very clear under the loupe and obviously f
  3. kgbudge

    Coral fossil?

    Coral fossils? From a recent trip to the Payson area, Arizona. Possibly Naco Formation.
  4. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  5. connorp

    Tiny Pennsylvanian Ammonoids

    Over the past year I've I found two tiny ammonoids from a site in the Carbondale Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Illinois. Both measure approximately 5mm in diameter. The first specimen below showed no details of the exterior of the shell, which I believe are necessary in identifying these. This week I found a second specimen (maybe a different species) which does show the suture pattern. I'm hoping that this specimen is identifiable. Part Counterpart Does anyone recognize the species? Thanks!
  6. I found this broken nodule in an outcrop of Pennsylvanian shale in Northeast Oklahoma. I’m wondering if the fossil could be the upper part of a skull? Other common fossils from this site include fragmentary fish remains (e.g., teeth, spines, dermal denticles, and coprolites from sharks and other fishes), as well as invertebrate remains from ammonites, gastropods, bivalves, brachiopods, corals, and conularia. If this is a skull, would you guess it to be from a fish, amphibian, or reptile? I don’t see any traces of teeth in the nodule, but I can provide closer views of areas that might be o
  7. Hey everyone! I was planning on passing through Brownwood, Texas, which I know is definitely full of fossils if you know where to look. However, never having been there before, I do not know the best publicly available sites to hit. Would anyone happen to have any they could suggest? Thanks so much!
  8. So.....I was splitting my last piece of Pennsylvanian stark shale member, between Winterset and Bethany Falls limestone from a 2x2' 2" thick piece, I found some cool conodonts, a lot of scolecodonts, and amassing a pile of split shale, when I came upon yet another listracanthus/fish spine, about 5-6cm in length and very slender (2-3mm in width). I have both positive and negative pieces (depicted here). I scan all of these to see the pattern, faint impressions of a wider segment (as seen in photo 6 ), and in this particular specimen noted the shiny black cracks and creases surrounding the fossi
  9. JamieLynn

    Texas Pennsylvanian - Crinoid?

    I found this little critter in some Pennsylvanian micro matrix I brought home. I am guessing it's an odd crinoid but it is also not like any I've come across. Any info will be appreciated! Size 1/4 inch
  10. Last year @jdp was kind enough to identify the tiny and jumbled skeleton I found in a concretion in eastern Illinois http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/107472-mysterious-jumble-inside-pennsylvanian-concretion/ as a lysorophian tetrapod and direct me to the Field Museum in Chicago as a possible repository for it. This month I finally completed the donation and it has been added to their collection, a fantastic event for someone who has been visiting the museum for more than 30 years to gaze in wonder at their world-class collection. Thank you again to @jdp and The Fossil Forum for m
  11. cngodles

    Pennsylvanian Ammonoid

    I found this a while back, but finally saw it as an Ammonoid. But which one I wonder. It is pretty thin. Unseen is the inner umbilical groove, but it’s likely not important for ID. Opposite side is unremarkable.
  12. Paleontologic Data Fossilized on IBM 8” Floppies Posted April 13, 2020 by Ben Muddiman, Ivo Duijnstee and Cindy Looy University of Chicago Museum of Paleontology Yours, Paul
  13. Hopefully I'm not breaking any rules here posting a link. I spent my weekend finally putting my catalog into a proper database, and creating a user interface for it. I used to use Google Sheets, which is pretty great. If I wanted to, I could use them as the source of data, but I decided to create a proper MYSQL database so I can keep relationships across tables, such as the stratigraphy of particular find locations. I have many more improvements coming for it, but it is at least functional right now. Everything from CG-0001 to CG-0161 is from the Glenshaw Formation, Conemaugh Group
  14. I found two of these little critters at Lake Jacksboro. I thought they were nautiloids based on the little round "hole" but upon photographing them, I can clearly see striations runing the length of the shell, more like a gastropod Euphemites, but the shape is not consistent with Euphemites but more nautiloid. Any help would be appreciated! Scale is in inches. First one: second one : Gastropod Euphemites for comparison:
  15. historianmichael

    Sphenophyllum emarginatum

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Sphenophyllum emarginatum Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  16. DPS Ammonite

    Crania Brachiopod

    Crania Crania modesta is a rare calcium carbonate Pennsylvanian inarticulate brachiopod. The shell is very thin and the ornamentation of the shell below shows through. You can see the interior of a near circular 4.6 by 4.8 mm pedicle valve that attached itself to aLinoproductus prattenianus (photo #1). A bryozoan also covers the front and back of the Linoproductus (photos #2 & #4). Photo #2 is a different photo of the same Crania as in photo #1. The Crania has a thickened rim and a sub central knob. Rowell (1965, p. 289) lists Crania as the only Pennsylvanian genus with a calci
  17. Over the past year, I've become fascinated with the often bizarre fish and sharks of the Pennsylvanian. Fortunately, my home state of Illinois is a great place to hunt for such fossils. I've shared several of these in other posts before, but wanted to put everything together in one thread. Probably won't have much to post for a few months after this, but once summer rolls around, I should hopefully have plenty of new finds to share. I would say there are three major settings in which you can find fish fossils in Illinois: Mazon Creek, black shales, and limestone. I have not had luc
  18. This was found in the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone of Illinois. My best guess is that the "top" specimen is a fragment of a conulariid, and that the "bottom" specimen is a fragment of an inarticulate brachiopod. But as I have never found any trace of a conulariid at this site, I was hoping to get a second opinion. It measures about 0.75cm at the widest dimension. Inarticulate brachiopod? Close ups of the "conulariid"
  19. Wrangellian

    Payson Arizona corals

    Some more fossils that I acquired from fellow members of the local rockhound club, a couple who spend their Winters down there (except this past Covid year). I've got the location info but not the accurate stratigraphic info nor IDs. These are from two different locations in the Payson area. According to the maps in Gem Trails of Arizona (which the couple used to find the sites), the horn corals are from a spot along a road on the way to 'Agate Mountain', and the colonial types are from Houston Mesa, "right at the top of the hill". I don't know if the two locations are the same formation, or..
  20. FossilNerd

    Wayne's Carboniferous

    When it comes to fossils, I am a generalist by nature. I haven't met a fossil that I didn't like! However, in an attempt to narrow my focus a bit, I have decided to take a cue from Adam ( @Tidgy's Dad ) and start this thread. I hope to showcase some of my collection, but more importantly have a central place to post IDed specimens, information I have found regarding them, and/or ask for help with IDs. Hopefully other's will get enjoyment from seeing the specimens and potentially learn a thing or two. So come along on my journey through the Carboniferous! If you haven't had the plea
  21. From MD, visiting OKC for another week. Had a great day at Lake Texoma last weekend and looking to spend a few more days around Thanksgiving hunting with a local or with local wisdom. Could us a little help getting a little more off the beaten path where less broken fossils are more likely. I guess you'd call me an experienced newbie. Elementary science teacher by day, love to hunt fossils by the days I'm not teaching. Would love to find some more ammonites, do a nice trilobite hunt, or whatever is within a "reasonable" drive for a day or two trip. Any favorite spots or formations with c
  22. I found this oddity today while examining some fine grained finds. This is basically soft limestone, where the rock is pretty soft and most of the calcite has been dissolved. I forgot to include a scale, but if I were to guess, it's about 1/2" across the structure (12.7mm). I plan on measuring again. There were several of these throughout the piece, but this was the most prominent. My guess is some sort of Bryozoan.
  23. historianmichael

    Annularia stellata

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Annularia stellata Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  24. historianmichael

    Stigmaria ficoides

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Stigmaria ficoides Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  25. Titan

    Pennsylvanian Beekite Ring?

    Over a year ago when I was just starting to hunt and collect fossils I came across this the ravine slope of a creek that cuts through the Winterset limestone at my old house. It could be washed from another formation. It looked interesting so I kept it and have been trying since then to identify it. I’m not sure if I’ve landed on the right thing – or even if it’s a fossil but I am thinking it might be a beekite ring similar to the one here https://lakeneosho.org/Paleolist/99/index.html only more 3D. It’s also quite possible it’s just quarts and I’ve just looked at it too long! However I’m curi
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