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  1. Brianb

    Elko Nevada Fossils

    I found these 5/10/21 around Elko Nevada Nevada in an area rich with coral and Brachiopods. Any help identifying theses so appreciated! Ty!
  2. Hello everyone, I recently received a lot of 3 brachiopods from Spain. Here they are with their original labels that they were listed with and that I received them with: The issue is that when I began to do a bit more research on these species, specifically Hexarhytis the paper that comes up shows and describes a completely different brachiopod. Looking up the other Athyrid the results I got were much closer but still not exactly like the brachiopod I have, but since I got more results for this search I could now do a bit of looking into the closely related taxa whic
  3. After seeing @connorp Fossil of the month entry that came from this location, I decided to stop out at this roadcut for a couple hours today. The weather was perfect, high 70’s and like almost every other trip, I had the place to myself. This cut exposes the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation and never disappoints, that is if you are looking for brachiopods. Unfortunately, this time I did not find and shark teeth, like I did on my last two recent trips. I did find one of my largest Echinoconchus brachiopods tha
  4. Who want to help me ? I would be happy to offer brachiopods from France ,but also various nice Echinoids or carboniferous plants in exchange of new species i still not have .
  5. I bought these brachiopods and didn't think about how they are so small that you could hardly see them when they are on dislpay in my shelf. If anyone knows how to build a magnifying display I would aprecciate it. I have know idea if this is possible but even if it's not I appreciate your responses.
  6. nala

    4 very strange brachiopods

    Perhaps somebody have seen these very strange shape before?(i saw a lot of brachiopods before but never like those before)the very big problem is I can't say the stage ,the location, the label will be "Known unto God "
  7. Hello everyone. I’ve been chiseling apart some of my less than fabulous Mississippian Coldwater Shale packstones that I find in South Haven (MI) on Lake Michigan. Typically, I’ll discover various brachiopods, a few gastropods, various bryozoan, some ostracods, and little bits of flora that look like tiny seaweed. However, recently I opened up a packstone with a very different fossil inside. I have nothing else like it in my collection. A few folks I know have speculated the things I mentioned in the title of this post. The second picture is... I guess I would call it a ca
  8. Last summer I posted a trip report about finding some Pennsylvanian black shale in a river bed in East Central Illinois http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/106753-628-illinois-black-shale-trip-w-listracanthus/. I was able to visit the site again once more in the fall last year when the river was running much lower and collect more and larger pieces of the finely bedded and fissile shale. Since then I have been slowly splitting and going through the rocks I brought home, and finding many interesting fish parts- that is definitely the dominant fauna presen
  9. Since the weather was beautiful this morning after I did some rowing and grocery shopping, I decided to hit the Oglesby Road cut again. This cut exposes the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation. This was another great day, I found another Petalodus tooth today, it is nice, but not as nice as the one I found last Sunday. I found a lot of huge brachiopods today after they popped out of the matrix. The exposure- Composita argent
  10. Back in Oct. the Dayton Gem and Mineral Society had a field trip to the St Paul Stone Quarry in IN. Waldron shale. I've been slowly prepping my finds (along with other stuff) and finally completed my task. By far the most different piece I've found in a long time....a Rafinesquina-type brach covered in a bryozoan, with a Calymene face sitting on top, surrounded by pyrite. Size = 1.5" W x 1" D x 1" T. A complete, 3/4 prone Calymene. About 1.25" long. Some complete gastropods, all whose brown "shell" is pyrite. Some gastropods that are
  11. Mainefossils

    Brachiopod id

    This is another fossil from the Silurian Leighton Fm, Maine. It is an excellently preserved internal and external mold of a brachiopod. It is similar to the Salopina species that I am constantly finding in this formation, but this brachiopod's valve is more strongly curved, instead of almost flat. It also has less numerous striae, and they almost reach the median process. As well as this, the dental plate is thinner and curves inward more strongly, and the ctenophoridium is wider. Any help on its identification would be greatly appreciated. Here are some pictures of it (internal mold on the le
  12. A few weeks ago, just when we were inundated with the spring muddy season, I stopped at a site that features Decorah Shale with a little Platteville mixed in. If you haven't collected in the Decorah Shale, let me say it stays MUDDY even in a drought!! The site had been worked over for a finish grade. This means the site will soon be lost to vegetative overgrowth. So I proceeded to collect a 5 gallon bucket of mucky matrix to clean and examine at home, in case the weeds invade quickly. Here are some select finds from that bucket.
  13. Mainefossils

    Literature on fossils

    Fossil forum, Good morning. I have been looking for literature on the following for a while now, and have not been successful. I was wondering if anyone already had information on the following, or can direct me to a place where I can look for it myself. Brachiopods, specifically Lingulids (classification and identification) Salopina genus ( classification and identification), this genus was moved from Orthis, for further clarification Rhychonellida (classification and identification, at least to the genus level). Camarotoechia genus (classificat
  14. One of the nice things about being on the team to design a new facility is you can get what you want. All retaking walls and benches are locally quarried Stoner Limestone from Weeping Water, Nebraska. I can’t wait to get my scribe and chisels out...
  15. Misha

    Bunch of Brachiopods to ID

    Hello everyone! I recently received a package from @connorp filled with wonderful brachiopods! I am not exactly sure as to what the IDs for some of them are so I thought I would ask here Any help is greatly appreciated! Thank you 1. Silica shale. These look like Atrypa sp. but I am not sure what species are present in this formation. 3 cm wide 2. Same formation. Stropheodonta? 2 cm wide 3. This is from the Ordovician Liberty Formation. Rhynchonellid not sure what genus or species 1.5 cm wide 4. Some kind of strophomenid from the Mifflin Mem
  16. Taking advantage of my time spent home, I finally got a couple of glass display cases to showcase fossil specimens from my collection. Finding ones that were affordable and blended with the style of our home, was challenge, and I took my time choosing. Despite a bit of criticism I receive from some of my fossil collecting friends, I am a generalist collector who doesn't specialize in anything. Having said that, my collection does feature some rare faunas; Devonian and Cretaceous bivalves, Lower and Middle Devonian brachiopods and gastropods, Cretaceous vertebrates, etc. The focus is largely on
  17. Okay gang. Don’t ever do this. Brachs are so common here ( along with crinoid bits) I use them as aquarium gravel... But, here’s what happens when you figure out how to acid prep Kewitz limestone to expose calcite and not loose morphology: I finish these with a week long silicon oil soak to make them shine.
  18. Yesterday, Tim (Fossildude19) and myself met at our usual meeting spot and with Tim driving and his downloads playing, we headed north to a planned rendezvous with the New York Paleontological Society's outing at Cobleskill Stone Products just outside Schoharie, N.Y. The weather was gorgeous- perfect really, sunny mid-50s. Fall colors were in full swing. We drove through the northern edge of the Catskills, arriving early at our rendezvous, the parking lot at the Cobleskill Stone Company. It was my first time there since 2013. I went on two previous NY Paleontological Society outings to this si
  19. From http://sciencythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/05/yuganotheca-elegans-early-cambrian.html: "An Early Cambrian Lophophorate Animal with affinities to Brachiopods and Phoronids. Lophophorates are animals which feed using a filter called a lophophore, which comprises a number of setae covered tentacles, to extract food from water. The group includes the shelled Brachiopods, the worm-like Phoronids, the minute Entoprocts, and colonial Bryozoans, and has been shown by molecular and embryonic evidence to be related to the Molluscs and Annelids. Within the Lophophorates the Phoronids
  20. Jeffrey P

    Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State R
  21. I found a variety of brachiopods in the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, Ohio, in mid-August. A few are a bit pyritized.
  22. Bob Saunders

    Brachiopod

    We visited our son at the house he bought outside of Lafayette, Macon County, Tennessee, United States. This limestone with a nice brachiopod and a partially exposed one and others was sitting along the fire pit. No telling where it is actually from or who left it there, but it may well be a local find. Please tell me if I am correct on the type of pod? Richmondian (Upper Ordovician) strata in the Central Basin of Tennessee. Ordovician Period beginning 488.3 million years ago and ending 443.7 million years ago. 1 5/8" w 4.2 cm x 1 1/4 3.2 cm high Brachiopods- Rafinesquina ponde
  23. ClearLake

    NE Iowa Paleozoic

    I read a lot of fossil hunting reports on here, but I don’t post many. I think it’s primarily because it is usually many, many months after I have gone when I finally get everything cleaned up, ID’d and take photos, etc. It just seems too after the fact to me at that point, haha. But this time, due to a wonderful “tour guide” we had, I wanted to get something posted in a relatively timely fashion. Because of that, I haven’t had time to do a lot of research I need to do on specific ID’s but luckily I’m somewhat familiar with most of what we found to make at least an educated guess.
  24. Hi, my daughter is fossil obsessed and we are heading out to regional NSW for a trip and would love to do some fossil fossicking along the way. We are going to Canowindra, Parkes, Bourke, Broken Hill, and Griffith. If you have any suggestions as to places we could fossick that would be wonderful! thanks
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