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Found 25 results

  1. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Specimen: 9.0g / 43x28x12mm Collected June 15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  2. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Specimen: 9.0g / 43x28x12mm Specimen pictured here is fluorescing under exposure to longwave UV light, and also illuminated by ambient LED light. Collected June 15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  3. Barrelcactusaddict

    VIDEO: Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  4. Barrelcactusaddict

    VIDEO: Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 432.5g of amber recovered; lot is initially displaying fluorescence under longwave ultraviolet light (365nm). "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  5. Barrelcactusaddict

    VIDEO: Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  6. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  7. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  8. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  9. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  10. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  11. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  12. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  13. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber in Matrix (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  14. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber (Hanna Fm., ~57-56 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Field Collection: June 12-15, 2022 "Glory Hole" Site Hanna Basin Carbon County, WY Hanna Formation (~57-56 Ma) Deposit: *While amber is found throughout the Hanna Basin, only one site is known to yield large pieces of clear, stable amber: the locality known as "Glory Hole" is located within the north-central section of the Hanna Basin, in south-central Wyoming; exposures are positioned about 8,500 ft. above the base of the Hanna Fm., and at an elevation of roughly 8,900 ft. above sea level. Extensive layers of lignite and carbonaceous (lignitic) mudstone host abundant plant fossils and amber; the matrix is fissile (easily separated into thin layers) and friable (crumbly). Physical weathering (freeze-thaw, wind erosion, thermal expansion, etc.) of the exposures has created an expansive area of disintegrated substrate. This particular site was once a watery paleoenvironment, characterized by shallow swamps. At the very top of the bluff are layers of fissile, light-colored shale referred to as the "Upper Lacustrine Unit" of the Hanna Fm. Amber: *Occurring as small droplets, runs, and globular masses, much of the amber is transparent and of a reddish-orange color throughout, with some containing plentiful internal fractures. The intact, non-fractured amber is very hard, measuring 2.5-3.0 on the Mohs scale, being generally harder than Dominican and Chiapas ambers. It is very fragile and fractures easily, but takes a high, glassy polish like Myanmar amber. Through PyGC-MS, the amber is shown to come from a cupressaceous source tree, and is extremely similar chemically to cretaceous amber from the Raritan Fm. in New Jersey. Of several hundreds of pieces collected by some of the authors, et al., of the cited publication, prepared, and studied at the American Museum of Natural History, only one contained a single insect inclusion: a wingless thrips (1.1mm) that was heavily-compressed and deformed due to geologic forces. From my time at the site, I observed that much of the in-situ amber, especially large pieces, was concentrated within a short horizon only a couple feet in depth. It was especially common near buried, coalified remains of branches and logs, and matrix layers containing numerous leaf remains (mostly cupressaceous). Additionally, I've noticed that some of this material is fairly phosphorescent when exposed to longwave UV light. Minerals and Fossils: While collecting at the site, I noticed several other interesting features besides the amber I sought: carbonized leaves were present in some of the separated matrix layers, petrified wood was present in-situ and eroded from the matrix, and transparent gypsum crystals (some being relatively large) were commonly exposed along the site's surface. Also found in-situ were coalified twigs, branches, logs, and even stumps; I had partially uncovered a few such logs in my shallow excavations (6-12" deep) for amber. I observed a few stumps (~15" diameter) still preserved in an upright position, perpendicular to the matrix layers, with the majority of the lignitic remains buried beneath the surface. Recovered from coarse-grained sandstone originating from above the lignite deposits, was a partial angiosperm leaf imprint with distinct veins. Significance of Hanna Basin Deposits: *Throughout the Hanna Basin, amber is found in various quantities, physical conditions, sizes, and ages: the age range of the ambers' host strata sequence ranges from Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene (76-56 Ma), an unprecedented range among all the world's known amber deposits. A stratigraphic interval more than 5 miles thick separates the highest and lowest occurrences of amber within the Hanna Basin. Paleocene amber is very rare, with only a handful of significant deposits in the world, notably from the Paris Basin and 5 localities in Switzerland. Source: * "Amber from Upper Cretaceous through Paleocene strata of the Hanna Basin, Wyoming, with evidence for source and taphonomy of fossil resins"; Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 163-204, December 2000; David A. Grimaldi, Jason A. Lillegraven, Thomas W. Wampler, Denise Bookwalter, and Alexander Shedrinsky

    © Kaegen Lau

  15. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Roughly 200g of small (≈1g) nodules and runs of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China; the mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  16. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small 2.5g representation of a 41.1g lot of amber from the old Crossman Clay Pit locality. This amber is mostly unsearched, and a few specimens I have inspected contain some inclusions; preparation will be needed to identify these inclusions, however. Spectroscopic and chemical analyses indicate this amber was produced by distinct, related species within the Cupressaceae family. The material from this lot was collected in the early 1990's by the late Kevin Kropiki; he collected at this locality in association with representatives from the American Museum of Natural History: his significant contributions aided and furthered the study of this amazing material and its inclusions.

    © Kaegen Lau

  17. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Select pieces of cretaceous (mid-Campanian) amber from North Carolina, weighing roughly 0.7-1.5g each; most pieces found from this locality only weigh under a couple grams, which is typical of most U.S. deposits. Along many portions of the Neuse river, south of Goldsboro, the embankments expose the various members of the Black Creek Group: the Bladen member overlies the older Tar Heel Fm., and underlies the younger Donoho Creek Fm. To date, amber has only been officially described to occur in the Bladen member, and is believed to be of araucarian and/or cupressaceous origin.

    © Kaegen Lau

  18. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    56.6g of cretaceous (mid-Campanian) amber from North Carolina; most pieces found from this locality only weigh under a couple grams each, which is typical of most U.S. deposits. Along many portions of the Neuse river, south of Goldsboro, the embankments expose the various members of the Black Creek Group: the Bladen member overlies the older Tar Heel Fm., and underlies the younger Donoho Creek Fm. To date, amber has only been officially described to occur in the Bladen member, and is believed to be of araucarian and/or cupressaceous origin.

    © Kaegen Lau

  19. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small, partially broken nodule of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .8g and measuring (mm) 15x11x10. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  20. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; the oblique view better displays the slightly oxidized surface of the largest flow in the piece. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; note the several flow lines of successive runs. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  22. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  23. I_gotta_rock

    Fluorescent Silicified Cypress Wood

    From the album: Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    One of Delaware's many mysteries is the petrified wood found near Odessa and Smyrna. The general consensus is that is cypress wood of some kind and it was buried under Pleistocene sediments. However, the origin of the wood and the age have yet to be figured out. Some say Miocene. Others say as old as Cretaceous. There are no other co-occurring fossils in the deposit to give any clues. The photo on the right was taken using a 395 nm UV lamp.
  24. Hi All, I'm looking for good locations and formations of Fossil members of Cupressaceae and Araucariaceae, and any other conifer species that might apply, in the Western and Southwest United States. Any other known localities of good exposures of fossil flora in the US would be appreciated. I've visited John Day and the Chuckanut Formation, as well, so I'm already aware of those. Anybody know anything about LA Porte, California or Ione, California for fossil plants? Thanks in advance.
  25. Planning a trip to Utah the next few weeks... Looking for Moriconia, Elatides, Brachyphyllum and any other related fossil conifer genera. Any tips on formations or locations would be appreciated!
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