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Found 23 results

  1. Hi all! Here are two shark teeth from Kursk Oblast, Russia. I think they are Albian-Cenomanian in age. Am I correct that the left one is Dwardius sp.? If yes, any idea what species? The right tooth has extra cusplets. Any idea what it could be? I looked at the paper of Solonin, et al. (2015), https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.8052775, but I can't find a good match. Thank you very much for your help!
  2. Hey all, Here are four teeth from the Gault Formation, Albian stage of Folkstone, Kent, UK. Am I correct that the left two teeth are Dwardius siversoni? The right two teeth have somewhat relatively bigger cusplets and they are more round. Could they be Dwardius or possible Cretoxyrhina sp.? I noticed that the book chapter of Ward (2010), https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280316422_Chapter_21_Sharks_and_Rays, also mentions Cretoxyrhina aff. vraconensis from the formation. Any thoughts? If you need better pictures, just let me know.
  3. isurus90064

    Extraordinary Common Teeth

    Hey guys, I've been off the radar for awhile .. work you know .. been working on Siggraph for those of you who are familiar with software development. Just wanted to start a new topic here .. This one is right at 3.00" - 7.62cm C. carcharias Bahia Inglesa Formation South of Caldera Provincia Copiapo III Regio de Atacama Chile
  4. I've often wondered what some of the fossil shark teeth in my collection would look like if they didn't have root damage, missing cusplets, etc. Many of these imperfect fossils are somewhat rarer and/or otherwise favorites of mine, so I've been hesitant to permanently alter them through restoration. Recently, I decided to go ahead and restore several of these teeth--but wanted to do so in a way that wouldn't be permanent. The technique I've adopted is to first paint the broken surfaces of the teeth that I want to restore with a couple of coats of liquid latex. Once the latex is dry, I then shape and build restored roots, cusplets, etc. out of epoxy putty on top of the intervening latex layer. The putty sticks well to the latex and can be shaped to match the tooth without directly touching or bonding with the fossil. In most cases, when the putty is dry, the restored pieces have been easy to detach with a simple tug, as the putty doesn't permanently bond to the latex (the latex layer itself is also then easily removable/peelable from the fossil). In a couple of cases, I have unfortunately caused a bit of damage to teeth in the process of removing the restored pieces. Once, because I inadvertently pushed the putty into an indentation in the root of the tooth and as a result it couldn't be cleanly pulled off/out. Another time, the tooth I was working on was more fragile than I realized and the force of pulling the putty off caused a fracture. Luckily, the damage wasn't too extensive in either case, and I've (hopefully) learned to be more careful. I had never attempted to restore teeth before but I found some very some helpful tips for doing so on TFF here and here. A few additional notes on materials and methods: The "white" (it's definitely more of a gray) epoxy putty I've been using is Apoxie Sculpt, which I ordered from an art supply store. I ordered the liquid latex online as well. For root surface texture, I've also used the liquid latex to create several small surface molds from different fossil teeth, which can be pressed into the epoxy putty before it hardens (as recommended in one of the TFF posts linked to above). I use an X-Acto knife for texture and shaping as well. I use fine sandpaper of varying grits, from 400 to 2000, to smooth the "enamel" portions of the restorations. I use acrylic paint for the colors--sienna, umber, tan, black, white, red, blue, yellow--and finish things off with a clear matte or clear gloss acrylic glaze to improve durability (the gloss glaze is for "enamel"). I use small amounts of non-permanent Museum Wax (ordered online) to attach the final restored pieces to the original fossils. Below are several of the results (the original teeth and the detached restored parts are on the left and the final teeth with their restored parts "attached" are on the right of these images). Otodus obliquus tooth from the Eocene of the Isle of Sheppey, Kent, UK -- restorations to the root and a missing cusplet: Cretodus sp. tooth from the Cretaceous of Texas, USA -- restoration to the cusp (I did a better job of color matching on the lingual than the labial side of this one): Cretodus sp. tooth from the Cretaceous of Texas, USA -- restoration to the root and a missing cusplet: Dwardius siversonii tooth from the Cretaceous of Stary Oskol, Russia -- restoration to the root: Otodus aksuaticus tooth from the Eocene of Maryland, USA -- restoration to the root and a missing cusplet: "Hubbell" Otodus megalodon tooth from the Mio-Pliocene of West Java, Indonesia -- restoration to the root and a small part of the cusp: Carcharodon carcharias tooth from the Mio-Pliocene of Florida, USA -- restoration to the tooth and a small part of the cusp:
  5. bthemoose

    Cardabiodon or Dwardius?

    I acquired the tooth below a little over a year ago along with some Cretodus crassidens teeth from a Texas collector. They're from a Dallas County, Texas, site that exposes a buffer zone between the Eagle Ford and Woodbine Formations (Cenomanian-Turonian). All of the teeth were identified to me as Cretodus, and that appears to be correct for the others, but I'm pretty sure the ID on this one is incorrect. On further examination, it appears to be a cardabiodontid, though I'm not sure whether Dwardius or Cardabiodon. The slant length is just under 39 mm. @ThePhysicist @siteseer, you helped ID a previous Cardabiodon tooth that I picked up from Kansas--any thoughts on this one? @MikaelS if you see this, your expertise would of course also be much appreciated. Thanks!
  6. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi (Parasymphyseal)

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999) parasymphyseal tooth. Slant length indicated by longest side.
  7. bthemoose

    Texas Cretaceous shark teeth

    I have here two shark teeth from the Cretaceous of Texas that I'm hoping to ID. #1: Dwardius ?woodwardi? The first tooth below is from Dallas, TX, from a buffer zone between the Eagle Ford and Woodbine formations (i.e., late Cretaceous, ~90-96 mya). I previously posted this tooth in the mailbox score thread and the @ThePhysicist tentatively IDed it as Dwardius (woodwardi?) but recommended posting it in the ID forum. I'm finally getting around to doing that! This tooth measures 25 mm on the slant. #2: Cretoxyrhina ?mantelli? I don't have as much info on the next tooth below. I acquired it last year from the estate of a Dallas, TX, fossil collector. I don't have any other details, but it was most likely collected from a site in North Texas. I've tentatively IDed this as Cretoxyrhina mantelli teeth; if that's the correct ID, it would be the first one in my collection with cusplets. This tooth measures 29 mm on the slant. Thanks in advance for any help you can provide!
  8. Untitled

    Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album: Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk region Dwardius woodwardi tooth.
  9. Untitled

    Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album: Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk region Dwardius woodwardi tooth.
  10. Untitled

    Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album: Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk Region Dwardius woodwardi
  11. Untitled

    Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album: Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk Region Dwardius woodwardi
  12. Untitled

    Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album: Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk Region, Russia Dwardius woodwardi tooth.
  13. Untitled

    Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album: Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk Region, Russia Dwardius woodwardi tooth.
  14. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi (Parasymphyseal)

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999) parasymphyseal tooth. Slant length indicated by longest side. This tooth's identity alluded me for some time.
  15. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  16. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  17. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  18. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  19. Chase_E

    Dwardius woodwardi

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Dwardius woodwardi (Siverson 1999). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  20. ThePhysicist

    post oak creek shark tooth

    Hey y'all, this is a shark tooth I found a couple months ago in post oak creek. I initially thought it was a cretodus, but now I'm having second thoughts. The 4th and 5th pictures are cretoxyrhina vraconensis and dwardius woodwardi, respectively. Thanks!
  21. Anomotodon

    Dwardius woodwardi

    From the album: Albian vertebrates of Ukraine

    D. woodwardi anterior. You can see a notch between lateral cusplet and the main crown typical of this species.
  22. Anomotodon

    Dwardius siversoni 2

  23. Anomotodon

    Dwardius siversoni

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