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  1. Mtwombly

    Mystery tooth?

    Hey guys, I found this in a creek close to me in south Florida, and while I originally presumed it to be a small, worn down bone upon first glance, further inspection made me suspect it might be something else. It has a unique enamel-like texture and there are rings visible on top. Yet it’s quite dull and tiny, it wouldn’t be a very effective incisor. I’m stumped! I’m hoping someone might have some ideas?
  2. Mtwombly

    Strange little find

    Hi all, This is a tiny little find from a creek here in Florida. It could be nothing more than a polished bit of fossilized bone with some coincidental marks, but the markings are odd to me. I haven’t found bone pieces with such symmetrical and aligned cuts like this before. I was wondering if anyone has any ideas what this may be?
  3. Mtwombly

    Gator/bovine bone?

    Hey guys! I'm hoping someone can help me ID this bone? I found it a little while ago in a river close to me in south Florida. I feel like it’s something obvious like a gator or a bovine but I can’t get a definite answer and it always drives me nuts when I can’t ID a bone! I’ve found one or two others similar to this in the past.
  4. Fossilized Dad

    Venice Beach Florida Fossils

    Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum. My daughter and I were in Florida for her spring break. She's ten and interested in fossils, so I souped up a canoe with outriggers and bought a hookah system. Most of the time we spent was learning about how to dive down and overcome her fears safely, but we got some time on the bottom. No megs, but a few smaller teeth. I've attached some images. Not sure if we got the IDs correct, but here goes. best wishes, Lloyd Our guesses are bull shark, dugong, dugong, unknown, then a few smaller teeth
  5. Having spent most of my recent Peace River time around Zolfo Springs and Gardner, I wanted to get out someplace a little different and just have a nice paddle, with fossil hunting being an afterthought. No pressure to hunt, just have a nice paddle, a picnic, and some family time on a gorgeous day. So, we decided to visit Payne's Creek for the first time since early 2019. My wife Tina, my stepdaughter Rebekah, and my grandson Ben (his only online class was cancelled, so he had the day off) came with us. The weather was perfect. Sunny, warm, and very low humidity (unusual for this t
  6. CrimsonNight

    Partial Tusk?

    I am relatively new to fossiling, but I am excited that on my second trip out I found something very interesting. I found either a metatarsal from some land based animal or a tusk. Its very oval and some kind of enamel that is about 1/4 in thick. Found in Alafia River, Polk County, FL
  7. Shellseeker

    Marine Mammal

    I have acquired 2 Marine mammal fossils in the last few days. One is a dolphin periotic found in the Peace River Thursday. @Boesse walked me thru the identification of this find a couple of years back Pomatodelphis is an extinct genus of river dolphin from Middle Miocene marine deposits in Alabama, Florida, Brazil, Germany and France. I thought it was similar to a river dolphin, but when I examined it today, it is about the same size but otherwise.... not so much Here are a few other angles While I have previously found a number of Dol
  8. CrimsonNight

    Strange bone

    I am new to all this and some of my ID books are still in the mail. Can you all help me ID this?
  9. Bone Daddy

    Peace River Tooth. Horse? Which one?

    My stepdaughter found this tooth in the Peace River (FL) on our last trip out. I tried to take decent photos of the chewing surface, but my hands are shaky (shakier after Covid). Can anyone ID the species on this one? If not, I can have her take some better photos.
  10. Shannon Billingsley

    Santa Fe River Tooth

    Hi everyone! Long time lurker, first time poster haha. I’m still kind of new to this so sorry if this is a super obvious ID, but I was wondering what kind of tooth this is exactly. I was thinking crocodile, but it seems to have a slightly different shape so I wasn’t sure. I found it at Ginnie Sprints in High Springs on the Santa Fe River in Florida. It’s about 2 1/4” long. Thank you in advance for your help!
  11. For the last several weeks Tammy and I have been volunteer digging every Wednesday and Saturday at the Montbrook site a little south of Gainesville (FL) with the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH). The weather called for continuous light drizzle all day yesterday (Saturday) so we bumped the dig day to today (Sunday) instead. Normally, Sunday and Monday are the non-digging days at the site but the other days are occupied by small groups of volunteers and site managers. This morning was clear and cool with a steady breeze from the north. This meant several layers while packing
  12. Hey y'all.... One more piece from Peace River, Florida... Can't find anything on books. Thank you all for your time.
  13. Idelond

    Is this a fossil or a rock???

    Hey y'all.... Another piece from Peace River, Florida... Is this a fossil or a rock??? Is very heavy and dense... Thank u all for ur time
  14. The attached photo shows material that seems to be fairly common in areas of the Peace River that have allot of deteriorated limestone and limestone slabs.I don't think it has any recognizable structure suggesting it is the result of some life form. Just generally a botryoidal shape. Does anyone know what it is or have any experience with it?
  15. Bone Daddy

    Gauging our chances

    Well folks, the season is winding down, but we have another window to hunt before the summer rains come. I honestly thought the season was toast after that last big rain event a couple weeks ago. Look at that peak on the graph. It hit 9.25 feet briefly before beginning to retreat. Usually double-digits is the kiss of death around this time of year. But, the previous weeks were very dry and the ground acted like a sponge. The ground is not nearly as thirsty now, so another big rain event like that will probably finish the season off - unless we have another long dry stretch afterwards, which be
  16. Mtwombly

    Sperm Whale Tooth

    Hi guys, I know this isn’t necessarily an identification post as I’m quite sure this tooth belonged to a sperm whale. However, I have done a lot of research on other areas of Florida paleontology yet I don’t know much about ancient sperm whales or their teeth at all. I’m having trouble finding more info. I was wondering if this tooth (found in a creek close to where I live on the gulf coast of Florida) is particularly large for a sperm whale, or is this the standard size? Are they rare or difficult to find? This tooth was lying underneath the top layer of gravel alongside half of a 5 inch
  17. Shellseeker

    Small Mandibular symphysis

    Many things on the plate. I went back to sort finds from a trip last week and found this fossil that is confusing me. It was late in the day and I was hurrying to empty this sieve and load another one. I thought it might be a mandible section and noting no teeth, tossed it into my collection bag. Now , I am at the point of trying to figure out what is it. It is a Mandibular symphysis, exciting by itself and small .. 16 mm length, 10 mm wide, and 7 mm high. Seems to have 4 or 5 Alveoli pointing straight ahead. like incisors of a tayassuid. I have looked at the Internet but
  18. Harry Pristis

    Florida palm "wood"

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    The common practice for petrified wood is to use "form genera" names for specimens, thus all petrified palm fiber is described as Palmoxylon sp and the roots as Rhizopalmoxylon sp. The reason for this convention is that the wood rarely gets as much attention as the foliage when plants are described and these components are rarely, if ever, found attached. In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, this bit of trunk was driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged wood sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud durin

    © &copyHarry Pristis 2008

  19. Harry Pristis

    Beetle Borings on Petrified Wood

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, these twigs and bits of trunk were driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged twigs sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine details such as bark and even insect borings. The wood is thoroughly mineralized with apatite -- it 'clanks' when two pieces are tapped together. This wood is dated biochronologically by the vertebrate fossils also found in the mud, notably Holmesina floridana, a gian

    © Harry Pristis 2008

  20. Harry Pristis

    Pathologies (knots) in Petrified Wood

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, these twigs and bits of trunk were driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged twigs sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine details such as bark and even insect borings. The wood is thoroughly mineralized with apatite -- it 'clanks' when two pieces are tapped together. This wood is dated biochronologically by the vertebrate fossils also found in the mud, notably Holmesina floridana, a gian

    © &copyHarry Pristis 2008

  21. Harry Pristis

    pine cone

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, this pine cone cob was driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged wood sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine details such as bark and even insect borings. The cob is thoroughly mineralized with apatite -- it 'clanks' when two pieces are tapped together. This pine cone cob is dated biochronologically by the vertebrate fossils also found in the mud, notably Holmesina floridana, a giant arm

    © Harry Pristis 2013

  22. Harry Pristis

    twig pathology

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    This bit of petrified wood, largely replaced by apatite (calcium phosphate), exhibits some damage from insects, or it may be a canker from a bacterial or viral infection. You can see other images with a brief discussion here: http://www.thefossil...ogy#entry368790 In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, these twigs and bits of trunk were driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged twigs sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine deta

    © Harry Pristis 2013

  23. fossil_newb

    First Fossil Haul - Help Please.

    Hey! We are needing some help with identifications. These were all found in Florida along the Peace River. Some of the photos are not the best, sorry in advance. Any help is greatly appreciated. I'll number them to the pictures. Thanks again. A&J
  24. Shellseeker

    Cetacean jaw

    I have been hunting fossils for 15 years. On Thursday, I found my 2nd ever section of detailed Cetacean jaw material. These are exceedingly rare. It is 2.8 inches in length and has 3 alveoli. It would seem to be more Dolphin size than whale sized. The patina would indicate that the top and 2 sides are relatively complete, and it is broken at the underside. Position wise, this section might be lower right, posterior half of Jaw. Please let me know if you agree this is Dolphin, and what are the possibilities. Here is a photo of Kentriodontae Dolphin with a jaw segment of simila
  25. Bronzviking

    Tampa Bay Fossilized Coral Branch?

    Hi Fossil Hunters, I found this unusual piece on Honeymoon Beach, Florida. It's not the typical shaped coral I find and has corallites on the base. I wanted to know what kind of coral and if it's fossilized or just a limestone cast (Steinkern)? Florida Guys I could use your help. @Harry Pristis @Plantguy @Shellseeker Thanks! Lynn
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