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  • Annelids
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    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

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  1. Florida Stratigraphic Geology Interactive Map Link: https://ca.dep.state.fl.us/mapdirect/?webmap=7a85fea2918a4e1f8effdb5bc9fe87f9 This interactive map from the Florida Geological Survey and accessed through the Florida Department of Environmental Protection website are simply amazing. Many various maps, layering, tools, and data provided free to the public. This is not the most intuitive, user friendly tool, so it does take time to figure out things like dropping a GPS marker on a precise location or adding other map layers, but it is well worth the effort to learn how to use
  2. Please find attached pictures of an oddly shaped and structured object. It was found while removing a deep rooted tree. This was in Royse City in Hunt County. After having no luck identifying it, somebody suggested this forum for guidance. Thank you for your review. Joe
  3. What kind of layers are these in East Tennessee very fine paper thin black stone, lots of natural right angles and mixed egg shapes and ovals seem to be found in them. 20 feet Above these layers are thicker gray limestone with corals and crinoids Does anyone know the story of these layers
  4. I found this super useful resource lately and thought you guys would enjoy: https://geologyportal.dnr.wa.gov/ It's an interactive geologic map of Washington state, it records multiple fossil beds and formations as well as old quarries and mines. It may take a little bit of research if you're unfamiliar, but it's an invaluable resource if you're searching for a new spot. Remember to stay safe and avoid trespassing
  5. hi, i am new to this forum. I bought these 2 trilobite fossils from a shop in los angeles. It was an antiques shop. I am just curious if someone can tell me if these ar genuine or fakes? thank you
  6. Creek - Don

    Google Timelapse

    It let you view any place on the earth how it has changed in 37 years via time-lapse animation. One thing I particular like about is the soil erosion. https://earthengine.google.com/timelapse/
  7. T. nepaeolicus

    Fossil Shell or Odd Mineral?

    Are these fossil shells with odd mineralization or a mineral of some sort?
  8. Here is my list of favorite items for geology and paleontology enthusiasts for 2020. Please feel free to add you own selections; give a specific model that you have used or researched. Estwing Geology Hammer, Estwing E6-24PC - Larger head and weight to partly replace small crack hammer and make it easier to hit your target. One piece construction can last a long time. Write in the Rain waterproof notebook, No. 135 - Take notes on your fossil localities. Fits in pocket. Select a bright color and get a good pen or a mechanical pencil with a large diameter lead.
  9. Hey folks,. A few months ago I started a new twitter account called Urban Geology. I thought about how sometimes simple window sills at home or at work or house fronts, tiled floors make some awesome displays of rock types that often go unnoticed, even by geologists. It's a good way to get to know new rock types and its mineral composition since it's often polished surfaces and other examples also show fossils, sedimentary features or volcanic features etc. With this account I share my own findings and search the rest of twitter for other findings to retweet. If you
  10. Hi Folks, I am looking for some good books on Florida geology and Florida fossils. I don't need any beginner level books - I have them all. I've done a lot of searching on the web, but Florida appears to be a geological wasteland in terms of rock books - not much to be had. This is not surprising, because all of Florida is nothing but sand and limestone. However, I am thinking that surely I must be missing something, so any recommendations are welcome. I am also looking for books on Florida-specific fossils for identification and distribution purposes. Googl
  11. Mr.Waffles

    It's definitely a..thing?

    Look guys I have a... well its definitely a something? Is it a plant, the top of a crinoid, a broken tooth, a really tiny volcano??? No idea. And as a bonus I have no idea where it came from either. It was given to me ages when I was a kid. So if you've got any ideas on what the heck it might be, I'd love to hear 'em! Thanks!
  12. Hey everyone. I thought I'd share some of the things I found on my last fossil hunt. So.. Many.. Fossils! One might even say that there were a plethora of fossils. If I could, I would've taken them all with me, but sadly my backpack can only carry so many rocks. I was literally examining each rock I had, trying to decide which to carry back and which to leave behind and how many I could fit in my pants pockets before they started to fall down. Eventually I decided to just stop looking for fossils and hike back to the jeep. This lasted all of 3 seconds before I found another a beautiful by
  13. Mr.Waffles

    What do you think?

    Hey guys, I'm back with another ID question. The fossil I'm trying to identify is in the 1st picture. I think that what I have is a fossilized brachiopod WITHOUT the shell. What do you guys think? It's the same general shape, but the color and textures of this fossil look different than others I've found in the area. The symmetrical textured part in between the two humps, I've never seen before. Pictures 1,2, and 5 show the fossil in question and pictures 3 and 4 show examples of other brachiopods that I've found. The last picture is an example of a brachiopod that was broken
  14. I have a fossil hunting friend, who keeps very little of what he finds. Anything that has serious issues goes back to the fossil gods or into the bone garden at home. To make it into his collection, it must be exceptionally good. I am not like that... I keep almost everything... to analyze and toss later maybe, but initially keep it. He keeps very few fossils, which has its advantages. We sort of have a deal... anything he does not want (in certain categories) he saves for me.. I do what I can to repay the kindness. One of those categories is whale: He gave me this one last week
  15. Ago13

    Is this a bone?

    Is this a bone, and if so what kind of bone is it and maybe what kind if animal could it have came from? For context it was given to my grandfather by his brother in Arkansas a long time ago. Any help would be greatly appreciated
  16. Hey there! I know I know, I've been missing in action for the past few months. Work and Field work kept me busy. But I've now am taking the time to update my blog, and sharing some of my recent adventures. This one is not so much of a fossil hunting trip, but of discovery on fossil history in New Brunswick. A few weekends ago I went for a day trip to Saint John to meet up with my friend Matt at the New Brunswick Museum's Steinhammer Lab. He's currently doing a stint at the research facility and I couldn't resist, desperately wanting to tour this historic place. This building was the or
  17. I might be wrong, but I believe that this rock is sandstone (if it isn’t please correct me) and that the spots in it are feldspar. I was wondering why there is such an odd placement of the feldspar(if it is feldspar) and it made me wonder if there could be fossils in it. I was planning on putting it in a rock tumbler to see if it would turn out good, but if there are fossils in it, wouldn’t it be better to work on the rock and uncover them instead of just polishing the whole rock. If you think that there could be fossils contained in it, what could it possibly be? If not, no worries I’ll proba
  18. Greetings kind people, I'm so sorry if this is such a noob question. But I've searched and searched but I couldn't find answers to these on internet. (kindly correct me because I feel I maybe wrong): Smithsonian website said licking dinosaur fossil helps in identifying between a rock or a fossil... But isn't fossil a rock in itself? Fossils are made because minerals get replaced and it's not possible for bone to remain in its original state for millions of years. So, it's not the original material anymore.. so licking a fossil should equal to licking a rock? In that case, licki
  19. Mahnmut

    Geological?

    Hello together, Something I quite often see in the ID-section are pseudofossils commented as "geological/rock". I dont want to be nitpicking, probably it´s just short for "purely geological". Simply "geological" doesn´t seem opposed to fossil, in my understanding fossils do happen at the interesection between geology and biology. So "no biologic structure"=no fossil (except chemical fossils) , but "geological" seems to apply to all the specimens (if they are not molten plastic, recent bone, or something else entirely. ) English is not my native tongue as you may have notice
  20. Well, in my research to find a fossiliferous bed near me I have been struggling with the geology, and spending days driving around observing, taking notes and pics. Well, I just found a published paper from one of the original paleontologists. In it, he lists the location of each outcrop, but this leads to more confusion. When I track the T,R,S locations listed, there is nothing there. Every promising site I found while scouting is clearly visible on satellite mapping. When I look up the listed spots, I find NOTHING. It's just plowed farmland. I find zero evidence of buttes, mesas, draws
  21. WATERLINE

    Where to go in New Mexico

    Greetings!!! I'm planning a trip to New Mexico this summer. I would welcome any information besides the basic tourist stuff. I'll be in the northern Farmington area for a week. Can't wait!!! Thanks in advance for any insight. Bruce (WATERLINE)
  22. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded mar
  23. cngodles

    Paleontology Journals

    I subscribe to Science Magazine. Every month or two they will drop an interesting paleo article, but most of it seems to be about how people are studying vast numbers of cell specific proteins in an effort to understand the living. A very noble cause indeed. Are there any good paleontology journals out there worth subscribing to? I don't mind paying a bit more if a physical weekly/monthy/quarterly publication lands on my desk through the mail.
  24. Nothing to say about it other than the pic. I found it as is and did nothing except cleaning with water. So pretty. any ideas what it might be?
  25. I am assuming that this feature is just geology, but I would like a second opinion on this if possible. My eyes do wonders at seeing what I want to see instead of what is actually there. Thank you. This was found in Douglas County, Missouri, USA in the Roubidoux Formation. The feature in question measures 84x31mm. The host rock is 20x12.5cm. It was found near a seasonal creek bed where gastropods, rugose coral and crinoids have been found. Numerous trace fossils have been found in the area also. Thank you for your time and help.
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