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  1. Fossildude19

    Diplurus partial

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki - partial coelacanth Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, NJ, old Granton Quarry G-3 layer.
  2. Fossildude19

    Complete Coelacanth.

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    A complete, if yet unprepped, specimen of the late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Not sure how I will go about prepping this, but I have a few options. Late Triassic, (Rhaetian). Lockatong Formation, Newark Supergroup, North Bergen, NJ.

    © © 2015 Tim Jones

  3. GuineaPoliceman

    Strange leaf looks like insect wing

    Hi everyone. I found strange leaf. Leaf venation is unusial. Can it be somebody's wing? Length 53 mm. Russia, Chelyabinsk region. Late triassic or early jurassic.
  4. A new paper is available online: Oliver W. M. Rauhut; Femke M. Holwerda; Heinz Furrer (2020). A derived sauropodiform dinosaur and other sauropodomorph material from the Late Triassic of Canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland. Swiss Journal of Geosciences 113 (1): Article number 8. doi:10.1186/s00015-020-00360-8. Schleitheimia is the first latest Norian-Rhaetian sauropodiform to be described from mainland Europe (Camelotia is a sauropodiform, but comes from the British Isles), considering that Triassic sauropodomorph cladistic diversity from Central Europe was thought to be depauperate. Therefore, it is possible that a number of indeterminate sauropodomorph remains from the Late Triassic of Germany or France could be from either Schleitheimia or another massopodan clade, like Riojasauridae or Massospondylidae. The authors of the Schleitmheimia paper also note that Gresslyosaurus ingens is distinct from Schleitheimia, while agreeing with Moser (2003) that Gresslyosaurus is a distinct genus from Plateosaurus.
  5. Hi, If anyone is familiar with dinosaur names, the sauropodomorph informally known for a long time as "Thotobolosaurus" has been finally described and named in this paper: Claire Peyre de Fabrègues; Ronan Allain (2020). Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum, gen. et sp. nov., a new early sauropodomorph from the lower Elliot Formation (Upper Triassic) of Maphutseng, Lesotho. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology in press: e1732996. doi:10.1080/02724634.2019.1732996. Kholumolumo is the latest addition to an increasing number of sauropodomorph taxa from the lower Elliot Formation of southern Africa that have been either revalidated or newly described in the past 15 years. Until the work of Adam Yates, it was thought that lower Elliot sauropodomorph diversity was represented by three genera, Euskelosaurus, Melanorosaurus, and Blikanasaurus. However, Yates recognized that Eucnemesaurus (long thought to have been a synonym of Euskelosaurus) is a close relative of Riojasaurus and not a synonym of Plateosauravus (which Yates revalidated for diagnostic remains synonymized with Euskelosaurus after judging the Euskelosaurus type material undiagnostic), and the renaming of 'Melanorosaurus' thabanensis as Meroktenos along with its provenance being lower Elliot rather than upper Elliot as stated in the original description by Gauffre (1993) makes clear than lower Elliot sauropodomorph diversity is way greater than previously thought. That said, could anyone send me a copy of the above mentioned paper?
  6. Date of Trip: June 2018 Location: Quay Co., NM, USA Age: Late Triassic Formation: Redonda This was the second of a number of hunting trips across the country this summer (the first was Silex, MO, reported earlier). This will be the Triassic Vertebrate report from this trip. Triassic invertebrate report will have to wait (perhaps exciting news ). Triassic plants and Cretaceous inverts from the same general locality will also be reported later. These are finds from a coarse-grained fluvial deposit rich in fish remains. In one layer, ganoid fish scales were almost as abundant as the mineral clasts. Here is a view looking down on the bedding plane showing the fish scales laying on top: Here is the same chunk of matrix cut across the bedding planes (i.e. in side view) showing numerous scales in transverse section: Disaggregation of the matrix and rinsing through a sieve yields numerous small, complete scales (scale in mm): Large scales are present in the matrix but heavily fractured and very difficult to extract intact. (Continued below)
  7. Fossildude19

    Coelacanth ribs and pelvic fin

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Tail and body imprints, plus a partial skull, of 3 to 4 different Diplurus newarki. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Granton Quarry, North Bergen, New Jersey.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  8. Fossildude19

    Unidentified fish Skull

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    This skull will need to be prepared to find out what it is. It looks a bit too narrow to be from Diplurus newarki, (although, it could be) . It could also possibly be from the early ray finned fish, Turseodus sp. or Synorichthys sp., which are known from the same strata. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. North Bergen New Jersey. Granton Quarry.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  9. Fossildude19

    1/2 coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki. front and lower half of fish. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, New Jersey. Old Granton Quarry. Scale is in CM.

    © 2019 T. Jones

  10. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  11. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  12. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  13. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  14. Dpaul7

    IMG_7794.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coelophysis Dinosaur tooth fossils SITE LOCATION: Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel Co., New Mexico TIME PERIOD: Late Triassic (203-196 Million Years Ago) Data: Coelophysis is an extinct genus of coelophysid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 203 to 196 million years ago during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now the southwestern United States and also in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Coelophysis was a small, slenderly-built, ground-dwelling, bipedal carnivore, that could grow up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaur genera. Scattered material representing similar animals has been found worldwide in some Late Triassic and Early Jurassic formations. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Dinosauria Order: Saurischia Family: †Coelophysidae Genus: †Coelophysis
  15. Dpaul7

    IMG_7794.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coelophysis Dinosaur tooth fossils SITE LOCATION: Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel Co., New Mexico TIME PERIOD: Late Triassic (203-196 Million Years Ago) Data: Coelophysis is an extinct genus of coelophysid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 203 to 196 million years ago during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now the southwestern United States and also in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Coelophysis was a small, slenderly-built, ground-dwelling, bipedal carnivore, that could grow up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaur genera. Scattered material representing similar animals has been found worldwide in some Late Triassic and Early Jurassic formations. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Dinosauria Order: Saurischia Family: †Coelophysidae Genus: †Coelophysis
  16. Fossildude19

    Reconstruction

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    This is a reconstruction of the late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Reworked by me. (reverse black and white) FROM: FOSSILS AND FACIES OF THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY LOWLAND: ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND SEDIMENTARY DYNAMICS ALONG THE FOOTWALL MARGIN OF AN ACTIVE RIFT. Peter M. LeTourneau1,4, Nicholas G. McDonald2, Paul E. Olsen3,4,*, Timothy C. Ku5, and Patrick R. Getty Available HERE.
  17. Fossildude19

    Coelacanth duo

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    2 skulls of the Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. The larger of the two shows the front half of the fish, overlapping the body of a smaller coelacanth's body. from the Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Newark Basin, Newark Supergroup. Old Granton Quarry, North Bergen, NJ. The two fishes outlined in red:
  18. Fossildude19

    NJ Coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    A partial coelacanth, Diplurus newarki from the Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Newark Basin, Newark Supergroup. North Bergen, NJ.

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  19. Fossildude19

    Triassic coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen NJ. Collected on 2/19/2017

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  20. Fossildude19

    Coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Poorly preserved skull of Diplurus newarki Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation North Bergen, New Jersey, Granton Quarry.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  21. Fossildude19

    Skull and dorsal

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki Skull and first dorsal fin. Late Triassic Lockatong Formation North Bergen, New Jersey. Granton Quarry

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  22. Fossildude19

    Double skulls

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    A small plate with two skulls of the coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. The one on the bottom shows oblique dorso-ventral crushing. Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, NJ,

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  23. Fossildude19

    Another 1/2 Coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    A poorly preserved, partial individual Diplurus newarki. Late Triassic Lockatong Formation, Newark Supergroup, North Bergen, New Jersey. As always, right click the image and select "large" for best viewing.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  24. Fossildude19

    Blue Skull

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    A colorful skull of an unidentified fish, from the Late Triassic Lockatong Formation, Newark Supergroup. North Bergen, New Jersey.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  25. Fossildude19

    Front half of coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki coelacanth, The skull is present, if poorly preserved, as is the 1st dorsal fin. Late Triassic, Lockatong formation, Newark Supergroup North Bergen, New Jersey.

    © © 2015 Tim Jones

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