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  1. Shellseeker

    Mailbox Canine - STH

    When I first saw this tooth, I was thinking Allodesmus, maybe seal. But then I noted the hollow root. Certainly not croc/gator, so whale ? Do Dolphins have hollow roots? The ones I have found have closed roots. If whale or dolphin, which one? Tooth is about 2.6 inches long. Usual suspects: @Boesse, @ynot @siteseer Comments on open versus closed roots in marine mammals appreciated.
  2. Un Autre Monde

    Teeth?

    Hi there, Whilst clearing a pile of rocks from an excavation for a septic tank at our house in Burgundy we came across what appear to be several large teeth. They are smooth and conical in section and the largest is around 8 inches or 200mm long. We regularly find Ammonites and Belemnites as well as other marine creatures but have never seen anything like this before. In the same pile of rocks there also appear to be some small bones which are, for us, also unusual. Grateful for any ideas as to what they might be from….
  3. Tyrannosaurus-wreck

    Calvert County Fossils

    Hi everyone! I went to Flagponds in Calvert County MD a few weeks ago and came back with my biggest *actual* fossil haul so far (I posted here my first time with about 50 barnacle pieces)! I know there are a few ray plate fragments in here, and I've included what I think are bone pieces although I'm not entirely sure. Anyway, I'm having a lot of trouble identifying my shark's teeth, so any help with this would be greatly appreciated! I'll post numbered photos of my finds with this. If anyone needs a zoomed in, clearer or different angle pic I'm happy to provide more. (Advance apologies for the
  4. I found both of these a couple days ago on my last trip to Big Brook in the same pan, and both have a very similar texture and appearance that leads me to believe they could have belonged to the same animal. I shared both via PM with @Trevor, who suggested the vertebra was likely Mosasaur (but that it might have a diagnostic ID), and that the bone was some type of marine reptile. Just thought I'd re-post here in case others might have any thoughts to add to that. Also, if either is worth taking in for a more diagnostic identification, where/to whom should I take them? I have heard there is a m
  5. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  6. When I tap this with metal tweezers, it feels at least partially mineralized, but it has also changed color to a chalkier, lighter tone since it dried, which leads me to think it can't be fully mineralized. Would this be the case with a very young fossil (say Pleistocene)? Is there any Pleistocene material at calvert cliffs?
  7. Found this today at calvert cliffs. The only things I could think of that it could be were a juvenile porpoise or crocodile tooth. Anyone have any thoughts?
  8. Shellseeker

    A Very odd bone

    I have this bone that I found 4-5 weeks ago. I have not had any new insights, but I think it strongly suggests marine mammal and because of the foramena, mandible. All suggestions and comments welcome. Jack
  9. Made my second ever trip to Calvert cliffs (went to Calvert cliffs state park). The first trip last year was fun, but I didn't really find any of the big shark teeth that I couldn't find near home at Big Brook in New Jersey. This time I did much better. Stopped on the way home from a family vacation and finally got some of the things I'd been hoping for. Still no megalodon teeth, but maybe next time! Got only a small handful of shark teeth, but was lucky to get two very nice hemipristis teeth, one of which was in absolutely stunning condition. Also got so many stingray teeth I star
  10. Found on Mitchelville Beach, Hilton Head, SC Would be interested to know what it belonged to, whether fossil or not
  11. I found this small bone (about 5cm) in marine cretaceous material from NW Queensland, it is very thin and fragile. It looks very different from the common turtle bones i usually find in this location .Anyone else have thoughts?I have added some close up photos of the structure the total bone thickness is only about 1mm in the middle. Is this possibly pterosaur?
  12. I found this broken nodule in an outcrop of Pennsylvanian shale in Northeast Oklahoma. I’m wondering if the fossil could be the upper part of a skull? Other common fossils from this site include fragmentary fish remains (e.g., teeth, spines, dermal denticles, and coprolites from sharks and other fishes), as well as invertebrate remains from ammonites, gastropods, bivalves, brachiopods, corals, and conularia. If this is a skull, would you guess it to be from a fish, amphibian, or reptile? I don’t see any traces of teeth in the nodule, but I can provide closer views of areas that might be o
  13. This is my first fossil bone find. It was found near the mussleshell river in Montana. More specifically Roundup MT. It appears to be some sort of a whale bone fossil. I'm not sure? Any suggestions?
  14. I found these two stones on a beach on the southern coast of England, and they seem to have fossils embedded in them. I'm not sure what they could be, can someone here help me identify them?
  15. Shellseeker

    New for me

    When I am running out of time to hunt, I do not take any time to identify a fossil I do not recognize. This was one of those cases. Today, I am sorting and came across this tooth. I have my fingers crossed 1) because I have not found a tooth with the crenulated enamel pattern, and I hope that @Boesse can confirm it as marine mammal. The location is late Miocene, the tooth is 38.6 mm long. I know that this type of marine mammal tooth can occur in Georgia and South Carolina. Have others found similar in Florida. Please post if you have. Comments and suggestions appreciated !!
  16. Hi Any thoughts on this? Sold as uk stegosaur (Dacentrurus?) 14 x 11 x 6. From Abingdon, Kimmerisge Clay. I think it is actually a marine vert, but figured Id post in case im wrong. Thanks for the help
  17. Hello, a friend of mine found some kind of large fossilized creature in a cave on Sand Mountain in northeast Alabama. It was buried in red clay. The rocks containing fossilized bone are broken into many pieces; he has collected hundreds of small to medium sized pieces and there are many larger ones still at the site. Most of the creature is still there. The rocks are a sandy yellow color and unusually light weight. I washed one of them (#28) and there was a lot of tiny bubbles forming in different places, showing that the rock is porous. Three of the pieces (see pic below) he
  18. JorisVV

    Whale species Vertabraes

    After cleaning these 2 big bois, which are whale fossils. But maybe it's possible some people know what kind they are. If not, can you refer me to someone? Thanks in advance! The biggest is about 18CM in heigth
  19. Hi all My kids and I found this piece at the NSR and saw that there were multiple bone fragments in it. Do you all think that there is a fish jaw in the lower right portion of the specimen? If so, can anyone tell from which type of fish it is? Thanks in advance! Bret
  20. Jessedude92

    Identification help

    Anyone help identify this? Its covered in gastropods or so I've been told. Is it considered a mortality plate?
  21. Hi all, hoping I found something with these 3 pieces but thinking prob one or more are those tricky concretions I'm not too experienced with yet. Thanks for any help in advance!!!
  22. SG5707

    Wisconsin Fossil

    A while back I found this fossil in Wisconsin, unfortunately I don't remember where exactly I was when I found it. So far I have been unable to easily identify it. It is about 2 inches across, and about an inch tall. I can post more pictures if needed.
  23. LeviBess

    What is this?

    Hi, i have this worn rock that i found in Calvados, Cretaceous or jurassic sediments. I was thinking it was a weathered echinoid at first but it does not really look like it. Any idea?
  24. Mr.Waffles

    A Very Tiny Mystery

    Hello wonderful fossil-people! If you and you're gang enjoy solving a groovy mystery, I have a post for you! This rock was found in an area of Northern Arizona that is very well know for producing lots and lots of bryozoan, brachiopod, and crinoid fossils, as well as crystals and geodes. The bit of rock in question was found in the side of what appears to be a broken geode. There is a triangular fragment of stone that does not match the material surrounding it. There is also a white discoloration encompassing the triangle that I've highlighted in green on one of the photos below. The colo
  25. Saxon

    Marine ID help

    Hey everyone so I have recently been fossicking around Yass, NSW, Australia and have come across a seemingly common formation in the devonian group both in limestone and just shale and mustone, It occurs alongside corals and bivalves (in that case i'm assuming it's marine)and is sometimes in large colonies such as the ones pictured, as well as independednt from one another. Does anyone have any ideas as wo what this may be. Thanks in advanced
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