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  1. Chuy G

    Is it a Meg tooth?

    Hi, I’m new and I apologize if this is in the wrong section. I found this on the beach and from the instant I saw it,I hoped it was a meg tooth. I haven’t seen any online covered in this much matrix ? Did I say that right ? 😂 anyway I would love some input or opinions. Thank you !!
  2. Hello and thank you for looking. I found this rock in a dry river bed in Nayarit state, Mexico, near an ancient petroglyph site next to the river. I always thought it looked like a little frog, but have not been able to figure out what it might be. I really appreciate your help. It's heavier than the common volcanic lava rock from the area.
  3. There is a very interesting paper about the tracks of footprints of birds, pterosaurs, dinosaurs found just below the K/Pg boundary in the Las Encinas Formation, State of Coahuila, Mexico. Although the PDF is in Spanish, a more or less usable translation can be obtained using document option of Goggle Translate. The open access paper is: Serrano-Brañas, C., Espinosa-Chávez, B., Flores-Ventura, J., Barrera-Guevara, D., Torres-Rodríguez, E., Cadena-González, D., and Vega, F.J., 2024. Huellas de aves, pterosaurios, dinosaurios y el límite K/Pg en Coahuila, México (Footprints of birds, pterosaurs, dinosaurs and the K/Pg limit in Coahuila, Mexico). Revista-Maya-Geociencias, Febrero 2024. pp. 96-105. LInks to PDFs of Febrero 2024 and other issues of Revista Maya Geociencia A related paper is: Serrano-Brañas, C.I., Espinosa-Chávez, B., Ventura, J.F., Barrera-Guevara, D., Torres-Rodríguez, E. and Vega, F.J., 2022. New insights on the avian trace fossil record from NE Mexico: evidences on the diversity of latest Maastrichtian web-footed bird tracks. Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 113, p.103686. Yours, Paul H.
  4. Ariel1232

    Tooth or Shell?

    I found this on a beach in Cozumel, Mexico. I thought it was just a coincidence that I had a shell that looks like a tooth but my sister tells me its a tooth. Can someone help me figure out what this is? It looks like a light pink color.
  5. SarahGaz

    Shark teeth?

    Hi, we have discovered the items in the image attached and wondered if these are sharks teeth? location Mexico Carribean coast thank you!
  6. Helo members, I find this week this rocks around of a big boulder rock (check pictures of the boulder I 've include please). I think to propose this like a remains of disaster meteorite over some time in the geological time scale but I interesting what sciences think. The boulder is a single rock distorted in there around I find the rock I've share here and another ones than look's eucariots.
  7. Miguel Váquez

    Help to ID bone fragment

    Hi, good morning I like know if some body in the fossil forum have some clue about this bone fracment ID. The bone is to harder and have a plane surface like to conection to other, too have the spoge inside and is easy to see nerve cavities
  8. Recently acquired this amazing piece, a true female mosquito in Mexican Chiapas amber, very interesting to look at, especially the long needle-like proboscis which is used for biting and drawing blood. I’ve attached some high quality pictures below on the specimen Order: Diptera Family: Culicidae Common Name: Female Mosquito
  9. Arturo

    Possible fossil??

    Hi there. My son found this rock and he search it on a Rock Identifier app and said it may be a fossil. It kind of looks like it on the exterior. The rock has broken into peace’s and now he only conserves 3 of them. What looks odd to me is the interior , sounds like a rock though. Hope for some help.
  10. Need help on this one. This peace was given to a relative and he search it on and find out it may be a fossil. His grandfather find it and convert it to a lamp :/ . It looks like a family of Psittacosaurus. It seems there has been findings of similar dinosaurs in Mexico.
  11. Azhalt

    Mexico Shell

    My husband and I found this guy while searching for shells on our cruise to Mexico. We need help with the ID. TIA.
  12. Coahuilites

    Spongy?

    Can some help me to ID From Campanian age in Coahuila state of México. Thanks¡
  13. ConfusedDad

    Fossil?

    Hello everyone! my daughter asked me if something we saw in the akumal coast is a fossil or else. Of course we did not remove, we just took a video underwater, of which this screenshot is taken from thank you!
  14. joshuavise

    Trilobite Identification Help

    Hi all, I found a trilobite today while passing a rock shop in Daegu, South Korea, where I live. I've always wanted one, but fossil collecting is virtually unheard of here (at least as far as I know), so when I saw this one, I decided to get it. I was hoping for help identifying this particular species. The man at the rock shop said the specimen was from Mexico, and that it is real, but couldn't say much else (my Korean is terrible, and he didn't speak English). If it turns out to be fake, I won't be hugely disappointed, and would just consider it a pretty model. Here are some pictures. Any help would be much appreciated!
  15. Cindy Casqueira

    Dinosaur egg?

    Found in the desert in Tucson, Arizona. The “spots” are where the outer shell have peeled off and there a a slight ridge
  16. Hi all! I found this today on the beach in Yucatan and can’t figure out what it is. It feels like bone and sounds like bone but the teeth are some what flexible. The teeth pattern and shape is irregular and one side seems to have been chopped off. Two local fisherman didn’t have a clue. I’m also not sure it was an animal by the way the teeth originate centered and think it was part of a plant. Does somebody have a clue? Thanks in advance! Niek
  17. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Rough): Weight: 11.8g Dimensions: 33x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED Longwave UV (365nm) About the Specimen: A thick, red oxidized layer was formed over millions of years through oxidation during the amber's burial. The blue-green fluorescence is due to exposure of the amber's hydrocarbons to UV wavelengths in the LED light. There are numerous fossil barnacles and barnacle scars, coating the exterior of the specimen. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  18. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Polished): Weight: 11.4g Dimensions: 30x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED About the Specimen: This is the same specimen from other entries, but with polished faces that were once broken. The thick, red oxidized layer was formed over millions of years through oxidation during the amber's burial. The blue and blue-green fluorescence is due to exposure of the amber's hydrocarbons to UV wavelengths in the LED light. An excellent display of color zoning, this close-up image better shows the transition between oxidized and unoxidized layers, as well as strong fluorescence under LED light. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  19. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Polished): Weight: 11.4g Dimensions: 30x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED About the Specimen: This is the same specimen from other entries, but with polished faces that were once broken. The thick, red oxidized layer was formed over millions of years through oxidation during the amber's burial. The blue and blue-green fluorescence is due to exposure of the amber's hydrocarbons to UV wavelengths in the LED light. An excellent display of gradual color zoning, this image shows the transition between oxidized and unoxidized layers, as well as strong fluorescence under LED light. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  20. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Polished): Weight: 11.4g Dimensions: 30x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED About the Specimen: This is the same specimen from other entries, but with polished faces that were once broken. The thick, red oxidized layer was formed over millions of years through oxidation during the amber's burial. The blue and blue-green fluorescence is due to exposure of the amber's hydrocarbons to UV wavelengths in the LED light. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Polished): Weight: 11.4g Dimensions: 30x31x17mm Lighting: Longwave UV (365nm) About the Specimen: This is the same specimen from other entries, but with polished faces that were once broken. Numerous flow lines are seen in a radiating "Y" pattern on the bottom-left section of the specimen: the spaces between the lines represent individual resin layers that were produced in succession by the tree. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  22. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Polished): Weight: 11.4g Dimensions: 30x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED About the Specimen: This is the same specimen from other entries, but with polished faces that were once broken. The thick, red oxidized layer was formed over millions of years through oxidation during the amber's burial. Transmitted light (LED) from the rear of the specimen displays the depth of the color of the oxidized layer. Round, dark spots in the center of the specimen represent the fossilized barnacles attached to the opposite end of the specimen's rough exterior. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  23. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Polished): Weight: 11.4g Dimensions: 30x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED About the Specimen: This is the same specimen from other entries, but with polished faces that were once broken. The thick, red oxidized layer was formed over millions of years through oxidation during the amber's burial. The blue and blue-green fluorescence is due to exposure of the amber's hydrocarbons to UV wavelengths in the LED light; numerous flow lines are seen in a radiating "Y" pattern, and are especially fluorescent: the spaces between the lines represent individual resin layers that were produced in succession by the tree. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  24. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Rough): Weight: 11.8g Dimensions: 33x31x17mm Lighting: Longwave UV (365nm) About the Specimen: There are numerous fossil barnacles and barnacle scars, coating the exterior of the specimen. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

  25. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Chiapas Amber Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico La Quinta Fm./Mazantic Shale (Simojovel Group) 22.8-15 Ma Specimen (Rough): Weight: 11.8g Dimensions: 33x31x17mm Lighting: 140lm LED About the Specimen: There are numerous fossil barnacles and barnacle scars, coating the exterior of the specimen. History: The amber of Chiapas has a history of use that dates back to the age of the Maya Empire; amber was traded between different tribes, and sometimes sent as an annual tribute to other nations (i.e., Aztec Empire). It was frequently fashioned into ornaments and jewelry such as necklaces, as well as lip, nose, and ear plugs; living descendants of the Mayan civilization carry on this ancient tradition, and skilled artisans fashion amber into similar jewelry, and sculptures of intricate detail. Botanical Source: Through Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, as well as the presence of fossil leaves and flowers, the source trees of Chiapas amber have been identified as two extinct species belonging to the Hymenaea genus (Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae): H. mexicana and H. allendis; both trees are related to H. protera, which produced Dominican amber. The closest living relative of these three extinct genera is H. verrucosa, which is native to East Africa. Geology of Deposits: The Sierra Madre del Sur contains three amber-bearing Formations, beginning at the youngest: Balumtun Sandstone, Mazantic Shale, and La Quinta Fm.; amber is most frequently found in the Mazantic Shale and La Quinta Formations, and is associated with layers of lignite, and found in calcareous marine sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Amber specimens up to 60cm long are known to occur at the Campo La Granja mines. Sources: “Amber From Chiapas: A Gem With History”; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Voices of Mexico, No. 72; Lynneth S. Lowe 2005 “Mexican amber history”; Mayan Copal (website blog), March 29, 2018 “Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods”; Scientific Reports, Issue 6; Rony Huys, et. al. 2016 “Hymenaea mexicana sp. nov. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) from Mexican amber indicates Old World connections”; Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Issue 139, pp. 125-132; George Poinar Jr., Alex E. Brown 2002

    © Kaegen Lau

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