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Found 23 results

  1. RuMert

    Moscow echinoid test

    From the album: Late Jurassic echinoderms of European Russia

    Unknown echinoid, Moscow, Moskva river, Middle Volgian, Dorsoplanites panderi zone, 8 mm. Exceptional find
  2. RuMert

    Moscow echinoid test 2

    From the album: Late Jurassic echinoderms of European Russia

    Unknown echinoid, Moscow, Moskva river, Middle Volgian, Dorsoplanites panderi zone, 8 mm. Exceptional find
  3. RuMert

    Peski Cyclocrinus stem fragments

    From the album: Late Jurassic echinoderms of European Russia

    Numerous in Callovian and Oxfordian, Some can be quite large (3 cm and more). Calyx is unknown. Moscow Oblast, Peski quarry
  4. RuMert

    Shmelovka Pentacrinus stem fragments

    From the album: Late Jurassic echinoderms of European Russia

    Shmelovka, Moscow, Late Volgian, Craspedites nodiger zone. 1 mm, the whole concretion is about 3 cm
  5. RuMert

    Fili Pentacrinus stem fragments

    From the album: Late Jurassic echinoderms of European Russia

    Very small, 1 mm, frequent in Fili Park, but overlooked due to their size. Kachpurites fulgens zone, Late Volgian
  6. RuMert

    Fili echinoid spines

    From the album: Late Jurassic echinoderms of European Russia

    Abundant in Fili Park, Moscow, in the Epivirgatites nikitini layer (middle Volgian). Up to 5 cm
  7. RuMert

    Almost micro 3

    Hi all! This is another report from Oxfordian quarries in the vicinity of Moscow. Previous 1 (Peski) Previous 2 (Timonino) Peski again. If you read my fossil sites overview, you know that Peski quarry is a unique site where you could find lots of Carboniferous fossils, Middle Jurassic dinosaurs, calcitic Callovian ammonites and very good Oxfordian gastropods. The latter are the most numerous and easier to search for. My trip took place in April and was mostly a success with a good variety of finds
  8. historianmichael

    Middle Devonian Brachiopod ID Help

    This past Sunday I found this brachiopod along with several others at an exposure of the Moscow Formation (Middle Devonian) in Western NY. I looked through Linsley and Wilson without much success at identifying it. It is likely an immature specimen, which always makes figuring out an identification hard. I would love to hear your thoughts. Any help is greatly appreciated! Also, while I have your attention, I could use some help differentiating Spinatrypa spinosa and Pseudoatrypa devoniana. Spinatrypa spinosa? Pse
  9. RuMert

    Russian fossil sites

    Hi all In this topic I'll give a brief overview of Russian fossil sites and typical fossils. I focus on the Jurassic as my main field of interest. The method used here is analyzing regional and temporary breakdowns of the number of specimens, shown by amateurs on Russian fossil resources, mainly ammonit.ru (about 40.000 finds). Unfortunately the overview has a inevitable bias towards the sites and fossil types attractive to the largest number of amateurs and downgrades those that are remote, less popular or less productive. The material is presented from an amateur's point of
  10. Hello everybody! In continuation of the Frozen Fossils and Frozen Fossils II topics this report covers fossil hunting in real winter, with excavating fossils from under the snow (@JamieLynn might be interested). The trips took place this week when we had a thaw with temperatures raising to +1-2 Celsius after a long period of frost (so that digging became possible). This time I visited the same site as in FF2, which is MUCH poorer than the one covered in FF1, but MIGHT yield more diverse fossils (which was unfortunately not the case).
  11. RuMert

    Jurassic fish (?) tooth for ID

    Hi, what do you think of this tooth? It's of round section (at the base), has carinae, rooted probably. Possible ID: Eutrichiurides, Lepisosteus or maybe something like croc? Middle Tithonian, Jurassic, Moscow, Russia (marine environment). 7 mm length. Provenance is not crucial, IMHO, if you have something similar, for example, from Dorset, please let me know. "frontal" view round base "side view", carinae a "head" is visible here, it was probably the part that stuck out of the jaw view from
  12. Hi all! Following the first topic I'll show you another fossil layer in that same location, Epivirgatites nikitini ammonite zone. It's the lowest of the three layers in Fili Park, relates to the middle Tithonian (Volgian, upper Jurassic) and is known for big ammonites and vertebrate remains. It's the last remaining accessible site in the region where you can count on finding Jurassic vertebrates. The finds are stable, but small, scarce and involve sifting.
  13. RuMert

    Almost micro 2

    Hi all! Today I'd like to introduce you to another place to hunt for small Oxfordian fossils, a quarry by the village of Timonino, located to the east of Moscow. The finds and hunting method are pretty much the same as in the previous site. Basically, surface collecting small Oxfordian fossils, usually gastropods, is a distinct sort of fossil hunting in the Moscow region. To the east of the city lies a sort of "Oxfordian belt" with similar geologic setting, finds and hunting conditions. Here's a map of the Oxfordian sites in the region. The quarries in operation are marke
  14. Hi everybody! Today I’ll show you yet another distinct fossil hunting location within the city limits. It’s situated in the south-east in the direct vicinity of the Moscow ring road (city and regional border). The outcrops are located on the banks of the shallow Shmelovka (Shmelyevka) river, effectively a small fordable creek.
  15. ...Down to Gorky( Brateyevsky) park... Hi all! It is time to introduce you to the famous Panderi zone of the Moscow fossils. It is named after Dorsoplanites panderi ammonite (middle Volgian/Tithonian, Upper Jurassic), which in turn got its name from Heinz Christian Pander. It consists of numerous cast iron-like (black, heavy, solid but fragile) separate concretions containing mostly ammonites and bivalves. The fossils from the Panderi layer are grim, black, rough and depressive (in line with this winter).The zone is present throughout Moscow but becomes most accessible in the
  16. RuMert

    Unknown Russian echinoid

    What do you think it is? The definition I got on the local forum is "conditionally classified as Plegiocidaris" Guides/handbooks on Moscow Mezozoic (unfortunately mostly outdated) list 5 genera: Echinobrissus, Rhabdocidaris, Acrocidaris, Holectypus and Cidaris. For this and neighboring stratigraphic zones Echinobrissus and Rhabdocidaris only, mainly the latter. Both are defined by spines, sometimes isolated plates
  17. Hi all, In continuation of Ludwigia's topic I'll show you another example of "fossil biking" along with some info on Moscow fossils. There's a dozen of spots within the city limits where you can at least try to find some fossils, one of them being Fili Park . It's an Upper Jurassic formation, similar to the one described here as in those times Moscow region lied on the bottom of the same shallow sea as the Volga basin. The difference is that in Moscow Upper Tithonian (Volgian) is better represented. The quality of the finds is unfortunately much worse. Fili Park is situated on
  18. RuMert

    Almost micro

    Hi everyone! Oxfordian again This time it's the turn of small shells from Peski Quarry, located some 80 km south-east of Moscow. It's something like the Moscow region's Jurassic gastropod heaven. For some geologic reasons, ammonites do not get preserved there while little gastropods and bivalves do. It's also the only place dinosaurs were found in the Moscow region. As of today the continental sediments are depleted, but the marine ones are stil abundant. The quarry extracts Carboniferous limestone, removing Callovian marl and Oxfordian clay. The clay is then discharged in open piles - sm
  19. Hi all! A bit of development to the Frozen fossils topic. It's the same Moskva river Bronnitsy Oxfordian, but some 5km upstream, where you can find a bit younger layer of Amoeboceras serratum ammonites (earlier it was Amoeboceras alternoides layer/zone). The difference is mainly in the keel, it's less pronounced. The layer is accessible only in winter. Dont expect it to be breathtaking, the preservation is unfortunately worse and the fossils are more scarce. The shore:
  20. RuMert

    Frozen Fossils

    Hello, everybody! Today I will present you an unusual way of fossil hunting, popular in Moscow - digging ammonites from under the snow! You'd expect that, wouldn't you? Well, it doesnt always involve snow (but often does), especially this year when we don't have it yet, but the site I will be talking about is available only in winter. The Moskva river level is intentionally dropped for "winter navigation" which typically happens at the end of November. Places located underwater become available which is also the case for Markovo foreshore situated some 40km to the south-east of Moscow. Th
  21. On April 20, 2019, a free paleontological excursion took place under the working title “Moscow Sea”. The weather was wonderful. +12 degrees clear. As a result, no one left without finds: ammonites (whole and fragments), belemnites, brachiopods and bivalves were found. My fees for the tour: a book on paleontology in Moscow and Moscow region, posters and demonstration materials, equipment for video shooting. Additionally, he grabbed PVA glue to process valuable finds immediately on the spot. After collecting at the Pionerskaya metro station, we headed to Filevsky Park.
  22. Jeffrey P

    Greenops Trilobite

    From the album: Middle Devonian

    Greenops sp. (trilobite cephalon/thorax) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, NY
  23. Jeffrey P

    Greenops Trilobite

    From the album: Middle Devonian

    Greenops sp. (trilobite-complete: pygidium folded under) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, NY
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