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Found 17 results

  1. ThePhysicist

    Developing Orthacanth shark tooth?

    From the album: Permian

    This may be a pathology, or a tooth in development?
  2. ThePhysicist

    Orthacanth shark teeth

    From the album: Permian

    "Eel" shark teeth.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Orthacanthus platypterygius

    From the album: Permian

    Freshwater "eel" shark teeth.
  4. Hi everyone I think I just found a new hobby With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet. So here is a recapp of what I all got: 3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma 1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas 1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone fo
  5. Hi all, Recently I was collecting at a locality that exposes the Duquesne Limestone and shale, which if you’ve seen any of my previous posts you’ll know that I’ve collected extensively. But for those of you that have not, the Duquesne shale is a layer of black, carbonaceous shale found in areas where the Conemaugh group is exposed. This layer is chalk full of disarticulated vertebrate remains, but some of the most recognizable are the teeth of Orthacanthus and Xenacanthus. These were eel-like sharks that existed from the Devonian-Triassic and had bicuspid or tricuspid teeth. They
  6. Hello everyone, Curious if anyone knows the difference between Xenacanthus and Orthacanthus shark teeth? Particularly as it concerns shark teeth from the Permian site in Waurika, Oklahoma? Have quite a few shark teeth from there and am unsure how to determine which is which. There's also Barbclabornia, to complicate matters! Any help would be appreciated (and yes, I have seen the rhynie chert website on them, but it doesn't show/tell the difference between the three kinds)
  7. Strepsodus

    Xenacanthiformes collection

    Here are my best fossils of Xenacanthiformes. All are from the British Coal Measures (Upper Carboniferous). The first one I suspect may be Orthacanthus due to the width of the cusps, though Xenacanthus teeth sometimes have quite wide cusps. I think all of the other teeth are Xenacanthus. The second one seems very large for Xenacanthus (I suspect around 14-15mm though it’s difficult to tell how far under the rock the cusps go) but I’m fairly sure it’s Xenacanthus rather than Orthacanthus. The third photo is what I believe to be a Xenacanthus denticle.
  8. fossilsonwheels

    Our new Shark Education Displays

    Pictures first, full descriptions will follow Paleozoic Sharks and “Sharks”
  9. Hi all, I have seen and heard from multiple different sources that the cephalic spines of Xenacanthid sharks are considered to have been venomous. This is usually supported by the serrated nature of these spines and a canal that runs down the middle of them. Has any research been done to prove or disprove this hypothesis. I know that we can never know for sure but I am curious if there is any scientific support to these claims. Thanks in advance, Zach
  10. Hey guys. I'm looking for some help with this large mystery fish tooth from the late Carboniferous of Illinois. The closest match i can find is from the Devonian lobed finned fish Hyneria. But this is late Carboniferous almost Permian. Another contender just based on size is the Rhizodont. But it's not rounded. This tooth flattens out to two cutting edges that are very sharp. It honestly reminds me of a Barracuda tooth. This broken tooth measures about 20mm, but would have most likey been around 30mm if complete. It is associated with a Megalichthys scale and Orthanth
  11. This head spine has just reappeared in my collection - I must have found it about 20 years ago in Linton. Is that an Orthacanthus or Xenacanthus head spine? The length is about 8 cm / 3". Thanks Thomas
  12. fossilized6s

    Megalichthys of Illinois

    Yesterday i found a very rare Megalichthys jaw with dozens of teeth still attached in the Carboniferous of Illinois, USA. This is possibly the best known example of this fish found in Illinois. Not sure yet though. I still need to do more research. You can see four larger teeth in cross-section on the matrix waiting to be prepped out. Then there are smaller teeth in-between the larger ones, maybe 4× smaller. I also found several large scales. I'll attach the best one. All of this material still needs a proper repair and prep job. The preservation on this ma
  13. In the last two weeks i have found two new very promising fossil sites. They are on private land that i have permission to be on. And please don't ask where. There are so many things that i have to leave many behind. I hope i am lucky enough to find something truly amazing from these sites and share them with science and ultimately all of us. I believe this to be the first Orthacanthus sp. specimen ever found in this area of Illinois. It would be pretty neat to add this awesome predator to this fauna. As found: After prep:
  14. Found this last Sunday. And i can't seem to narrow down who lost it, Xenacanthus or Orthacanthus. To my knowledge neither has been formally described from the location it was found. And, no, i will not say where. I'll simply say LaSalle county, IL. Still not sure if my site is Permian or Carboniferous. I'm 90% convinced it's Carboniferous. Any ID help is much appreicated. I'm leaning more towards Orthacanthus. Sorry, i'll add mm later. As found: After some needle prep:
  15. Hola, soy nuevo aquí, no tengo muy buena ortografía pero intentare redactar lo mejor posible lo que deseo solicitarles, estoy recabando y buscando información sobre animales extintos desde el pre cámbrico hasta el pleistoceno, pues estoy en el proceso de la creación de un libro con ilustraciones, así que si es posible me gustaría que me ayudaran con algunas especies, lo que necesito no es mucho, solo información sobre la especie tipo de cada genero (es decir, su distribución, rango de edad, el espécimen tipo y donde se encontró, etc.) pensé que podrían ayudarme pues en esta página suelen habla
  16. Some impressions from my private collection of permian fossils, some of them I digged myself, some I changed with other collectors, most of them I prepared myself the permian fossils had been found in Germany, Rhineland - Pallatinate niederkirchen , pdernheim and other locations
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