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  1. Hello everyone, Im planning to buy this phalange supposedly from brachiosaurus. I asked the seller how it ended up being identified as a brachiosaurus and he said that it's because it was found in a digsite where there was nothing found there beside 2 partial brachiosaurus skeleton. This fossil was found in the morrison formation size= 6 inch wide 6 inch long 5 inch at the tallest point weights around 24 lbs/11kg
  2. Got a new box of mixed KemKem material the other day; plenty of Spino, Carch, small theropod, croc, fish, and other usual suspects, but I can't put a name to this one. I'm fairly sure it's theropod, but since there is so little info available, it's hard to say which one. Anyone recognize this little fella? It's 32mm long by 21.5mm at the widest point; the grid squares are 1"/25.4mm. I can take additional pix if needed. Thanks!
  3. Hello, can someone help me identify these? They are from Holmdel, NJ. Sorry I don not understand the format of this text box. Forces me to type this way.They look like phalanges maybe?Thank you so much for the help! - Mike
  4. Found this little guy in the surface float near Glendive, Mt, hell creek formation. I thought it might be a theropod phalange, but a buddy thinks it's champsosaurus. Any thoughts?
  5. Hi, I received pictures of Spinosaurus hand phalanges from a friend. But I'm not sure the qualities of them. Would you give me some advice, please? Thank you
  6. Hi, I find a strange bone in the boxes from Morocco. I don’t know what it is. Suddenly, I think it may be a phalange of Spinosaurid. I took pictures of it. Please check the attached files. Thank you. Size: 15 X 4 X 4 cm Top side: Right side: Bottom side: Left side: Back side:
  7. Good morning. A seller sent me a video. It’s all about the claw, phalanges and premaxilla of Spinosaurus. May I have some opinions of them, please? Thank you so much IMG_8854.MOV
  8. Rohdefamily

    Phalange

    Hey all, new here so sorry if this isn’t the way to do this…is anyone able to help identify what animal this may have come from. It was found on a small portion of beach below a cliff with a lot of erosion in WNY south of Buffalo. Not sure if it came from soil or lake…either way it seems on the heavier side and I’m thinking it might be a phalange from a deer figured I’d see if anyone could help confirm or come up with a different ID
  9. Frightmares

    Spinosaurus Hand Bone

    Seller has this listed as a Spinosaurus hand bone with some repairs, no resto.... just wanted to get some of your guys opinions on it. Do you think it's real? Does it look like there's any restoration?
  10. I purchased these as Ingenia yanshini which I think became Ajancingenia, which then became and is currently Heyuannia. The formation provided is the Djadochta Formation, but that doesn't seem right since Ingenia/Heyuannia is not found there as far as I've checked. Unfortunately, there isn't provenance other than Mongolia attached to them to say whether they come from the Barun Goyot Formation where Heyuannia yanshini is found. While I'm not necessarily doubting the original ID, I just don't really know. I'm not expecting a positive or diagnostic ID to the genus level, but I wanted to at least know whether or not I can label this to Oviraptoridae indet., possibly Heyuanniinae indet. The original ID is a bit of an odd one, but it might have just been one of the few oviraptorids described at the time. Last I checked, there are now tons of recently described oviraptorid genera in Mongolia and China. The pair of phalanges with supposedly the semilunate carpal attached which I think is the smaller section? I know one of them did have glue in-between them when I lightly smeared it with acetone using a cotton swab. They are associated coming from the same sandstone block, apparently along with other shattered phalanges. Although I don't know if these actually came from the same animal since one looks ever so slightly larger. There is some sort of clump of sand or crystalized piece attached, as well as light beige or cream colored matrix. Not sure if that narrows down a formation, probably not, but I do see a lot of matrix from Mongolia tend to be red-ish color similar to the Kem Kem Beds. Any input is appreciated. There's probably a lesson to be learned here . . .
  11. RuMert

    Phalange

  12. RuMert

    Pliosaur phalange

    From the album: Late Jurassic plesiosaurs from the Volga

    Probably intermedium
  13. Hi everyone! Ya'll where a huge help with the shark teeth I posted, so I figured I'd ask for some help with some of the more unusual stuff I've found at Post Oak Creek. For anyone who doesn't know Post Oak Creek is a small gravel filled stream in north Texas that lots of Cretaceous shark teeth get washed into from the Eagle Ford Group (shout out to ThePhysicist for clarifying the formation!). However a lot of Pleistocene material gets washed in there as well so you get this lovely set of gravel bars where you're finding stuff like crow shark and goblin shark teeth in the same sift as a bison tooth or a horse bone. Anyway here are a few small Pleistocene fossils I could really use some help identifying. The first is a phalange, I'm thinking either Racoon or Bobcat though I don't know for sure. Second I think is a bird bone since it's completely hollow though I have no idea what bird (if it is a bird I'm counting this as finding a dinosaur bone in Texas!) Third is an incisor from a mammal I think. Any insight is greatly appreciated!
  14. These came from creek with mix of QAL and QT, first set I'm thinking the bigger one is deer phalange, not sure about the smaller one. Next one I'm going with croc vert, threw in the antler wondering how to tell if it's fossil, does the burn test work with it as well? I'm not very good with bones so might be wrong, appreciate the help!
  15. Ramon

    What is this?

    Hello, we found this bone fragment last month. It comes from Coahuila, Mexico, from the Cerro del Pueblo Formation, which is late Campanian in age (~72 million years old). All sort of dinosaur fossils are found at the formation, including ceratopsians, hadrosaurs, and tyrannosaurs. To me it looks like an ungual (toe bone). But the end of the piece is more blunt and rounded than most other ornithischian unguals I’ve seen online. Can any of y’all ID this piece, or is it just a regular unidentifiable chunk of bone?
  16. I need your assistance to roam the Plains once more. Have this bison rear leg assemblage coming but it is missing the left side medial phalange bone. If anyone has a spare, I would love to trade for Bakersfield shark teeth or some absolutely loaded micro matrix from the same location, or ? Please PM me for trade possibilities and your wants. I need this bone but for the other side.
  17. Here is nice little fossilized phalange bone that I found in Florida's Peace River. Like verts, almost all phalanges look alike to me, except for size differences. I'm having a hard time ID'ing this one. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  18. Found on Moss Landing Beach, near Monterey: 36°48'55.3"N 121°47'32.4"W. Partially covered by sand, washed in. Porous texture. Thanks for the help everyone! Photos: dorsal, lateral, anterior
  19. This small bone I found in my garden, was 1 of 2. It almost appears wooden.
  20. Good evening, I found 2 small bones on the beach in Tampa, Florida. The first one looks like a toe or finger bone of what animal? (6 views) The second looks like a turtle or sea bird bone? (3 views) Ruler is in inches. Thanks Fossil Friends!
  21. LordTrilobite

    Edmontosaurus Toe

    Phalange from the middle toe of an Edmontosaurus.
  22. I_gotta_rock

    Whale Phalanx

    From the album: Calvert Cliffs

    Baleen Whale Phalanx Bone Parvorder Mysticeti Miocene Virginia
  23. Thecosmilia Trichitoma

    Neanderthal child got eaten by prehistoric bird

    I thought this was interesting. https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/10/health/neanderthal-child-eaten-by-giant-bird/index.html
  24. Edit to add: more likely a phalange This was found in the river at the confluence of the Blue Earth and Minnesota River in South Central Minnesota on August 3, 2018. It appears to me to be an astragalus, the size of that of a white tailed deer, but the shape is not quite right. It matches none of the astragali found in Miles Gilbert's Mammalian Osteology. The "bump" at about the 4cm mark in two of the photos seems like a very distinctive feature, yet I cannot find an identification for this. About our area: This area was, in early American times, the land of the Sioux Indians and the bison. Geologically, this area is very rich in silica. We find a lot of mineralized bones of bison, bos, Odocoileus virginianus, etc. This is the north eastern edge of the great plains.
  25. megaholic

    Distal Core bone

    I found this on a exposed gravel bar yesterday. First thought was just a deer hoof core. After I got home I see it has a flat bottom, and has a ring of pores around it that the Odocoileus that I have do not share. Now I'm thinking turtle with no claws, or armadillo hind foot? It is offset to share a space with another. scale is in inches. This would be the bottom.
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