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Found 19 results

  1. Hello, I am going to purchase this lot that is from Richard's Spur Quarry and I was wondering if anyone on here knows how to ID fossils better than me. I've been looking at pictures all day but can't seem to confidently ID anything. I know most of these are probably Captorhinus, but are there any in this lot that look like a different species or a synapsid such as Varanops? Been searching for synapsid fossils forever and I really hope one of these is from a synapsid. There's 3 claws, 3 vertebrate, and 4 jaw sections. Don't be afraid to hurt my feelings if they all are Captorhinus, I think they're super cool too!
  2. Hello, I was hoping someone could let me know if these fossils are genuine Dimetrodon from Archer County, TX Nocona Formation. Thanks!
  3. ThePhysicist

    Secodontosaurus tooth?

    From the album: Permian

    Teeth from the Permian are often difficult, nigh impossible to identify with confidence. This tooth is strongly carinated, with the carinae proceeding to the base of the crown. It has no labio-lingual curvature and an irregular enamel texture. My best guess at the moment is a synapsid, something like Secodontosaurus.
  4. Dinocollector

    Jaw from Santa Maria formation, Brazil

    Hello! A collector from Brazil has shown me this fossil. Any idea what this partial jaw could be? It is from Santa Maria formation, Brazil. I don't know if it could be from a Dinosaur... it seems too big to be from a prosauropod... Could it be theropod? Or maybe reptilian or synapsid? Thank you very much.
  5. Hi folks, Here's another fossil I've always wondered about. I've always been frustrated with a general lack of early synapsid material (outside of some "pelycosaur" pieces) and I inquired from one of my trusted diggers at the time whether he had any cynodont material. Much to my surprise, he offered this tiny tooth. It's much larger than the classic Morganucodon mammaliform teeth but smaller than the Hell Creek multituberculate material. I had a great deal of difficulty photographing it even with a macro lens. It is from the Bull Canyon Formation, New Mexico, late Triassic. I've tried looking up pictures of cynodont teeth but they're so diverse. I'm hoping someone on this amazing forum can confirm whether or not it is a cynodont or can identify it even further. Thanks so much Cheers Marcus
  6. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon claw

    From the album: Permian

    Just the end of a Dimetrodon terminal phalange (claw). It could be an undescribed synapsid, but it seems to fit the morphology of a small Dimetrodon claw well (namely the sharp "v"-shaped cross section of the flexor tubercle). Length: 4 mm ^ Maddin & Reisz (2007)
  7. ThePhysicist

    Synapsid claw

    From the album: Permian

    Length: 3 mm
  8. ThePhysicist

    Caseid tooth (1)

    From the album: Permian

    Caseid synapsid tooth from the Early Permian. ^ Reisz (2019)
  9. ThePhysicist

    Caseid tooth (2)

    From the album: Permian

    Caseid synapsid tooth from the Early Permian. ^ Reisz (2019)
  10. ThePhysicist

    Edaphosaurus sail spine

    From the album: Permian

    These are easily identified by the"cross bars" which protrude perpendicularly from the shaft of the neural/sail spines.
  11. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon Tooth

    Identification: This tooth was found in processed microfossil matrix from Waurika, OK, USA. Reptile remains in general are very uncommon, so if you think you've found many pieces of Dimetrodon teeth, you're likely mistaking many Orthacanth shark cusps. Orthacanth shark enamel is smooth, and the serrations are quite prominent compared to those on Dimetrodon which are finer. Dimetrodon enamel is not smooth, as seen on this one. Dimetrodon crowns are also broader. Shark cusps broken at the foot of the crown also flare out, where reptile teeth do not. Were this crown complete, you would also notice a conical/round depression in the base. This is unlikely to be from another Sphenacodontid based on the locality, presence of serrations, and enamel ornamentation. https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms4269 Notes: This tooth is a post-canine/posterior tooth, which is the tooth position one is more likely to find in micromatrix since they are smaller.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon tooth

    From the album: Permian

    Dimetrodon sp. Wellington/Ryan Fm., Waurika, OK, USA Post-canine/posterior tooth This tooth is likely from D. limbatus, given the locality and presence of serrations: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms4269 The same paper also rules out other serrated Sphenacodonts by the enamel ornamentation. Its smaller size could indicate that it's from a juvenile. It differs from the comparatively abundant broken Orthacanth shark tooth cusps in the microfossil matrix (what most people are likely to confuse with): the enamel texture is not smooth, the crown is very broad (indicating it's likely a posterior, in addition to its size), it has fine serrations that differ in shape from the sharks', and the base doesn't flare out. Were this crown complete, you'd also notice a conical/rounded depression in the base. A beautiful tooth from one of our surprisingly close cousins.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Hatchling Dimetrodon Claw?

    Hi y'all. Found this in some Permian micromatrix from Waurika, OK. There's no way I'm this lucky, but is this a very tiny Dimetrodon claw? I've tried to get access to this paper, but still waiting to see if the authors will send the text. I'm fairly confident it's at least sphenacodontid, based on pictures I've seen on the forum. It's about 3 mm in length. @dinodigger@jdp
  14. Howdy folks, me again with more silly beginner questions... I saw this video of a vampire bat running and wondered if pterosaurs - with their crutch-like folded wings - might have moved in a similar manner? Youtube: Vampire Bat on Treadmill I also saw this video of a Panda cub running. Might synapsids like Dinocephalians or Gorgonopsids - with those weird, “inturned” arms - have moved in a similar fashion? Youtube: Panda Bear Cub Running I’m guessing the answers to both of these questions is probably “no” - I would think that even a slight difference in a single joint or in the spine or hips would totally change an animal’s gait - but I really don’t know how the anatomy of such creatures compare. Are there extant species similar to either of these extinct animals that might give us an idea of how they moved? Thanks a ton for your patience!
  15. paleo.nath

    Permian bone ID?

    This little bone is around 2 cm long and I’d like to know if this specimen shows any indication towards a species. It was found in a set of micro matrix from the Wellington formation, Oklahoma
  16. Synapsid fossilized in its burrow with offspring indicates parental care by mammal ancestors. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-12-earliest-fossil-evidence-parental-behavior.html
  17. Still_human

    Dimetrodon sail spine pieces

    From the album: Permian era fossils

    Very small fragments of dimetrodons sail spines. From the lower Permian Texas Red Beds, Archer city formation in Archer county
  18. Still_human

    Edaphosaurus with large predator bite

    From the album: Permian era fossils

    Yet unidentified Edaphosaurus pogonias bone from the Permian era Red Beds site in North Texas, with large unhealed tooth hole from what appears to be a large Dimetrodon's bite, from either the fatal attack, or post-death predation mark.
  19. From the album: Permian era fossils

    Reverse side of the unidentified Edaphosaurus pogonias bone with an apparent Dimetrodon tooth hole.
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