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  1. historianmichael

    Virginia Shell Hunt

    Last month my girlfriend and I took a trip to her parents' vacation house in North Carolina and on the drive down and the drive back we visited the Yorktown Battlefield and made a couple of fossil collecting stops in the Williamsburg area. These sites exposed the Late Miocene Eastover Formation (Cobham Bay Member) and Early Pliocene Yorktown Formation (Sunken Meadow Member). While we enjoyed weather in the low 50s during our stops on the drive down, we had to combat temperatures in the 30s and snow and frozen ground during our stops on the drive back. Though she did join me for some of it, to
  2. historianmichael

    Virginia Miocene/Pliocene Shells

    Last month I collected fossil shells at several exposures in Virginia of the Late Miocene Eastover Formation (Cobham Bay Member) and Early Pliocene Yorktown Formation (Sunken Meadow Member). While my intention was to focus on the larger fossils, when I got home and started to clean my finds, I thought it would be cool to screen the excess debris and see what else I had found. Although I ended up finding a lot of tiny shells and shell fragments, they require a microscope to see and the fine details have made identification challenging. I have consulted several publications on these formations a
  3. historianmichael

    Chesapecten jeffersonius

    As a graduate of the University of Virginia, I thought it would be cool to add to my collection a fossil named after the founder of the university, Thomas Jefferson. I was disappointed to read that one of the best places to find Chesapecten jeffersonius shells - Chippokes Plantation State Park - no longer allows you to collect the shells there. I had also read that Chesapecten sp. shells can be found at York River State Park, but that Chesapecten jeffersonius unfortunately cannot be found there. Is that true? Are there other sites in Virginia where you can find Chesapecten jeffersonius? With t
  4. wellwellwell

    Virginia mammal tooth

    Hello! i recently found a small, broken mammal molar. The occlusal surface is worn flat partially, this maybe difficult to see from the photos, it seems small to be an older pig, but pig was my first guess. If that is correct I guess it would most likely not be a “fossil”, although it seems to have some qualities consistent with mineralization. Is it conceivably human, about the same size and in better shape than some of mine! Very curious find for me and probably obvious for some members. thanks for your time!
  5. OK. I spent Sat on the James River collecting. It wasnt a great tooth trip, only found one sand shark. But its NICE. LOL I did, of course, find plenty of Chesapectens. Jeffersonius is my favorite, so I snagged a LOT of them. I also picked up a number of Madisonius. I think. Thats the first question. These ARE Madisonius, yes?
  6. Greetings everyone! I'm hoping someone might be able to help ID something that is not in the best of condition/shape. It's quite unusual from what I typically see/find here in Eastern NC - at first I was thinking the root of a whale tooth but it's not like any I've seen/found myself before. So, I'm hoping someone might be able to give direction if this is a tooth root or maybe even a small tusk root, possibly? There is only a tiny bit of enamel present on the tip where the tooth would be and the texture on the "inside" is somewhat similar looking to what I'd see in whale or maybe even a sliv
  7. msomma12

    Yorktown Formation ID

    Two species from the Yorktown Formation along the James River in Virginia that I cannot identify. One a coral (if not genus name, family?) and the other what I presume to be part of a bivalve. Both are very common yet I cannot find them in any references. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
  8. sixgill pete

    Interesting Yorktown Bivalve

    I found this bivalve in a clump of matrix that was attached to one of my other finds on a recent trip to the Tar River with @MikeR and @AshHendrick. I have never found one of these before nor seen one. Pliocene Yorktown Formation Rushmere Member. My best guess on this one is Pododesmus sp. It is 1.53 inch long (39 mm) and 1.42 inch wide (36.3 mm)
  9. SunnySmilodon

    Saturday at Aurora

    I had a pretty great day at Aurora yesterday. This was my third time there ever, and I managed to convince my boyfriend, father, and uncle (none of whom are as fascinated with fossils as I am) to tag along. I mostly stayed at the pile with my boyfriend, and was a bit bummed out because it seemed like everybody but me was finding decent sized megs and chubutensis left and right! I did find a nice snaggletooth though, and bought a few buckets to take home since we had to leave earlier than I expected. I'm so glad I did, because in the first bucket I found a pretty big meg tooth fragment. I also
  10. sixgill pete

    Heart Clam

    These are rarely found at this locality, especially with both valves.
  11. hemipristis

    Cetacean? teeth from the Yorktown

    hi all, Here are three teeth from the Pliocene Yorktown at LC. When found, I was told "pilot whale", which hasn't helped much. I do believe that they are from a tooth cetacean though. Could anyone hazard a guess as to genus/species? thanks in advance
  12. hemipristis

    Mystery items from LC: Marine mammal?

    Here are a pair of head-scratchers that I found i at LC. The first is from the Pungo River Fm I thought was a bivalve steinkern, but it is not carbonate, which one would expect in the lime layers of the formation (that, or phosphate, and itisnt phosphate). There is still some matrix on it. So that leaves me with maybe some portion of the bulla/ear region of a marine mammal, but that's purely a guess. The second is from the Pliocene Yorktown Fm, and the material appears to be the same as that of cetacean tympanic bulla. But it doesn't look like one, or like anything Ive seen from
  13. sixgill pete

    Cadulus or Polyschides?

    This Scaphopod is from the Pliocene Yorktown Formation, Rushmere Member. Found in some matrix from the inside of a large Ecphora from the Tar River in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. One resource I have at home (NCFC volume 2, Fossil Molluscs) calls this Polyschides thallus while every online resource I can find online calls it Cadulus thallus. I cannot find any resource showing a change in Genus from Cadulus to Polyschides. Does anyone have a resource showing this? Which one is correct?
  14. sixgill pete

    Divalinga quadrisulcata

    A very uncommon find for this site, possibly due to it's small size. Found in matrix from the inside of a large clam shell. PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell 1993
  15. sixgill pete

    Chlamys decemnarius

    From the Pliocene Yorktown Formation Zone 2 Rushmere Member. An uncommon find at this particular site. Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, II MIOCENE AND PLIOCENE PECTINIDAE (BIVALVIA) FROM THE LEE CREEK MINE AND ADJACENT AREAS, by Thomas G. Gibson
  16. sixgill pete

    Pandora crassidens

    Complete double valves are rare at this site. Pieces of this shell are not uncommon. Found at the base of Zone 2, Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation on the Tar River. The two photos of the hinge detail were included to show that detail. They are not from the same specimen. PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell 1993
  17. sixgill pete

    Pliocene Yorktown Formation Bivalve

    I need some help. This bivalve came from a river here in eastern North Carolina. Pliocene Yorktown Formation, zone 2 Rushmere member. I believe it is in the Family Pteriidae (pearl oysters) Genus Crenatula. However I cannot find anything in any literature I have or can come up with. Complete specimens are extremely rare at this site, though pieces are not uncommon. Any thoughts? @MikeR @SailingAlongToo Complete specimen top ... bottom .. another one I found complete, but broke after it got home. So I opened it to picture the hinge details ....
  18. Would appreciate some help on this one. Found at the GMR creek in Greenville nc, has peedee , yorktown and some Pleistocene stuff too, found among mako and great white teeth along with some Cretaceous shark teeth. The texture inside is interesting almost like the mastadon slivers I’ve found at gmr but not quite... maybe part of whale tooth root? Any direction is greatly appreciated, even if it is just a plain oh piece of bone, haha!
  19. As part of our recent tour through the Carolinas, Tammy and I stopped for a bit at the Aurora Fossil Museum (Aurora, NC) to walk through the museum itself as well as to have fun playing in the "sandbox" across the street. The local phosphate mine dumps fine gravel from the mining process in a big pile (two, actually) across from the museum so visitors can hunt for fossils in the fossil-rich gravel without having to deal with the liability issues of coming to the open-pit phosphate mine itself. I'm not quite sure if the fossiliferous gravel represents the Pungo River Marl (Lower Miocene), the Y
  20. sixgill pete

    Morus peninsularis

    Proximal end of right ulna. Very well preserved with amazing quill knobs. Brodkorb, Pierce 1955. The Avifauna of the Bone Valley Formation. Florida Geological Survey Report of Investigations, 14: 57 pages, 8 tables, 11 plates. S M I T H S O N I A N C O N T R I B U T I O N S TO P A L E O B I O L O G Y • NUMBER 90 Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III Clayton E. Ray and David J. Bohaska,Editors Storrs L. Olson and Pamela C. Rasmussen, 2001 Miocene and Pliocene Birds from the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina
  21. I went river collecting one weekend in early April this year, the water dropped pretty darn low for this time of year allowing me to get to some spots that usually I can only access June through September. I found more echphora than I've ever come across in a single trip, a couple of them are HUGE and a few were near perfect/complete! Also found my first larger (2 of them!) Welch (or conc? still trying to ID it) from this site along with a great array of other items. My personal favorite from this trip was the echphora with a barnacle attached - I always love to find barnacles attached to biva
  22. Hunterthurmond

    Did I pick up trash? Opalescent

    Found this washed up in a place I think is yorktown formation. I thought it might be fossilized because of the opalescence in the marrow. I dont know where to start on evaluating this, what do you all think?
  23. SailingAlongToo

    Mastodon Bones Found in SE Virginia Swamp

    Article from last Friday's Daily Press newspaper in southeast Virginia (Hampton Roads), about mastodon bones being found in a local swamp and being curated by the Virginia Living Museum. Interestingly, this discovery was made only 2 miles from where General George Washington and the Continental Army (aided by the French) politely requested Lord General Cornwallis to leave the American Colonies in 1781. http://www.dailypress.com/news/science/dp-nws-mastodon-bones-exhibit-20180123-story.html Cheers, SA2
  24. Found this over the holidays at a fossil site in Coastal VA that for me at least has never before this same trip coughed up any vertebrae material, that being a fish vert. The primary finds at this site are scallops, barnacles and some of the more common smaller mollusks common within the Miocene coastal / tidal finds.... this is a Yorktown formation locality... so, the question is, is the coiled material a fish coprolite or a tube worm? I’ve certainly never found any similar tube worms in my life so I’m hopeful it’s a coprolite but looking for some input from anyone w more defin
  25. sixgill pete

    Turritella alticostata

    A nice Turritella. Not uncommon at this site, but rarely in such good shape.
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