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It was an all day outing on a perfect spring day in Central Upstate New York. Al Tahan and I visited a small private quarry where the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member, part of the Marcellus Shale and the lower Hamilton Group is exposed.  It's been about a year since I visited the site which I've been coming to for the past five years and it was Al's first visit. Erosion had broken down almost all of the pieces of shale which covered much of the site on previous visits. However a lot of fossils here, preserved in calcite are weathered free from the matrix and surface collecting can be very productive.  This is by far the best site I've been to for the gastropod, Bembexia sulcomarginata. There were dozens strewn about the site. I couldn't resist picking up a few adding to my already extensive Bembexia collection. Brachiopods were also plentiful, especially the large spiriferid, Spinocyrtia granulosa (upper right). I couldn't help adding this inflated example to my large collection. Upper left is Mucrospirifer murcronatus, certainly one of the most abundant and distinctive Middle Devonian brachiopods in New York. Lower left is Protoleptostrophia perplana, a Strophomenid. 

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I did do a little digging in the bedrock and found a rounded object which I first thought was a concretion, but instead turned out to be by far my best find there, a complete Gosselettia triqueter, a Pteriomorph bivalve. Both valves are intact. It is my most complete and largest (3 inches long) specimen I've ever found. I've only found these at two sites located a quarter mile apart. Both expose the same formation. By far most of my specimens are from this quarry, but specimens are usually only one valve and/or significantly damaged, so you can imagine my excitement finding such a large example in nearly perfect shape. 

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Al and I then then traveled to another site an hour away that we had visited once before, an exposure of the Ordovician Denley Formation, part of the Trenton Group. Fossils are over all very uncommon at the site and you have to split quite a bit of rock to find anything. The majority of fossils are trilobites, but I also managed to find this inarticulate brachiopod. Of the trilobites I found, the best were Isotelus including this partial enrolled specimen that includes the pygidium and thorax. 

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The biggest heart breaker of the day, especially for me, was this partial Isotelus, pygidium and partial thorax that measured over five inches long. Complete it would have been over 10 inches. Wow! maybe next time. Always a reason to go back. 

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Tidgy's Dad

Love the brachiopods, but the Gosselettia is superb! :b_love1:

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49 minutes ago, Jeffrey P said:

The biggest heart breaker of the day, especially for me, was this partial Isoteles, pygidium and partial thorax that measured over five inches long. Complete it would have been over 10 inches. Wow! maybe next time. Always a reason to go back. 

 

 

Heart breaker? That would have made my day, my week, my month!  You sure are greedy, Jeff. :D

Congratulations on your finds, and thanks for posting them. I'm happy you and Al were able to get out there.

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Good outing with a lot of variety, Jeffrey. :dinothumb:

Yes, the Isotelus could be monsters! I have chunks (from Bowmanville) that, complete, would have peaked at 12-14 inches. :default_faint:They are the tanks of the Ordovician. :P 

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Fossildude19

Great report and finds, Jeff!  Well done!  :) 

Thanks for showing us. 

Love the Isotelus bits.

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Peat Burns

:wub::drool::envy:

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FossilNerd

Nice report Jeff! Glad you and Al were able to make it out. Those are nice big chunks of  Isotelus! I’ve only found one decent sized, recognizable piece recently. They are usually just bits and pieces down here.
 

Congrats on the Gosselettia find! It’s a beauty! :wub:

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TOM BUCKLEY

Way to go Jeff!:yay-smiley-1::thumbsu:

Tom

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Man oh man....if only. You are right that it isn’t all to easy to find bugs. Until next time :dinothumb:

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Beautiful double-valved Gosselettia triqueter - WOW!!! :envy:

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Excellent finds! You guys sure do travel fast! So many years in just one day :P

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In addition to the above pictured finds from the first site in the Middle Devonian, I found this very tiny Bellerophontoid gastropod, Praematuraptropis ovatus, a new species for my collection. Thanks go to Shamalama Dave for help with the ID.  

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Glad you could get that ID. Almost looks like an ammonite. Nice gastropod!

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That's an adorable little snail! :wub:  Congrats on adding something new to your collection!!!

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Nice catch, Jeff.

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