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Many of us collect Edmontosaurus sp. skull elements and bones.  Attached find a very interesting paper that describes skull elements on an Edmontosaurus regalis which is the Hadrosaur species found in the early Maastrichtian of Alberta.  It's a very close cousin to the late Maastrichtian Edmontosaurus annectens found in the Hell Creek/Lance Formations.  

 

 

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Beautiful Maxilla

 

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Paper:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0175253

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a very timely alert,Troodon.

 

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LordTrilobite

That paper definitely has some great photos. The tail on that reconstruction looks off though. The caudofemoralis seems to be either missing or too small.

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43 minutes ago, LordTrilobite said:

That paper definitely has some great photos. The tail on that reconstruction looks off though. The caudofemoralis seems to be either missing or too small.

 

Scott Hartman's view is slightly different 

 

http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/ornithiscians/edmontosaurus-regalis

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LordTrilobite

Thats a pretty big difference in the hips. But my comment wasn't about the outline. But the lower part of the tail has a groove in that reconstruction that shouldn't be there. As far as I know the caudofemoralis should touch the bottom of the chevrons for a large part of the tail.

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  • 2 weeks later...

An article on this topic

 

https://omni.media/the-dead-zoo-edmontosaurus?utm_content=buffer8d856&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

Even suggests like many other paleontologists that Ugrunaaluk kuukpikensis a recently-named hadrosaur dinosaur from Alaska that was originally identified as Edmontosaurus, separated out into a new species, and now seems to be synonymous with Edmontosaurus again.

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  • 8 months later...

It's there now!  I can't find them ALL! :D  That's why I rely on folks like you and doushantuo and Oxytropidoceras and many others to help me round up the strays!

 

-Joe

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