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Found 9 results

  1. ThePhysicist

    Lightning strike trike

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Plant roots often intrude upon a fossil's resting place, leaving behind white streaks when removed.
  2. I recall reading on the boards somewhere before that hadrosaur tooth crowns can sometimes be assigned to either the Lambeosaurinae or the Saurolophinae if enough of the crown is present. I was wondering if the same can be said for ceratopsid teeth? Can ceratopsid teeth from localities in which members of both subfamilies are known ever be identified down to subfamily? This question was prompted by both general curiosity and by the fact that I occasionally see isolated ceratopsid teeth sold down to the generic level (ie, one seller who has listings for Avaceratops, Judiceratops, and
  3. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Triceratops tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Sold as Triceratops sp. by the BHI. Normally, Ceratopsid teeth should be considered indeterminate since the teeth of the large-bodied Ceratopsids present in the Hell Creek fauna are virtually indistinguishable. Trusting the ID of the BHI would be to label it as Triceratops sp., but to be conservative (and since I don't know their reasoning behind the ID), I chose to label it as Ceratopsidae cf. Triceratops sp.
  4. ThePhysicist

    Ceratopsid shed teeth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Ceratopsidae (shed/"spit" teeth) Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA Labeled as "Ceratopsidae" because there are two valid genera currently known from Hell Creek: Triceratops and Torosaurus - whose teeth are indistinguishable. You commonly see teeth like these sold as "Triceratops" spitters, but this is not necessarily a correct identification.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA More information
  6. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA 3.5 cm height On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm., so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example),
  7. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus Tooth

    Identification: On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm.[2], so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example), only association with an identifiable skull can allow for identification beyond C
  8. ThePhysicist

    Ceratopsian spit tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Commonly called "spit teeth," these teeth were shed by the animal after heavy usage. ^From "Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops"
  9. Hello, I've put teeth here for Id a couple of times and always received a satisfactory answer. I hope you can help me this time too. It is about this Ceratopsidae tooth from the Niobrara Formationn (Wyoming). Unfortunately no fossils of this group are known from this formation and I therefore wanted to ask you if you have any idea what species of dinosaurs the tooth could belong to. The tooth is 1,5cm in size. I hope if you can help me with this! Best regards from Germany!
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