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Found 315 results

  1. I though maybe the invert folks would get a kick out of these two limestone slabs. I picked them up several years ago when driving home from Kentucky along the AA highway. I cleaned them up a bit, but with the soda rig that @Gizmo loaned me. I don't really know what the critters are, but they look neat.
  2. Limestone polishing

    I’ve been collecting for a year now. I started to make a limestone sink, because I love the limestone that I find marine fossils in locally. Well part of the process was polishing the bowl I cut out, and wow, polished black limestone is a thing of beauty. It even has some fossils in it. I’ll post the sink one day. Naturally, I wanted to try polishing a fossil focus piece. I found this nice coral, likely Rugosa. I polished it to 3,000 grit with a Dewalt polisher and a set of stone polish pads. It was a quick experiment but I liked how it turned out.
  3. Wormholes? Or bryozoan tubes?

    It's me again! And I promise that this is NOT a piece of concrete! ;-) (Joke from previous post.) This is the bottom of a limestone rock that has a lot of bryozoan fossils in it, found in our yard in Huntsville, AL. Do the holes look like trace wormholes? Or could they be from the digestive systems of the fenestalla bryozoans? I can get a closer photo tomorrow, plus photos of the rest of the rock if that would help. I left this one in the yard, but I know where it is! Thanks! Ramona
  4. I haven't posted in a while, due to traveling and then starting a new job, but I find it hard to stay away from the rocks in our yard. We recently moved into a house (Huntsville, AL), where I soon discovered that we had a wooded area with a creek bed full of fossils. From what I have seen so far they are mostly common bryzoan, crinoid, etc fossils in what I have learned is fossiliferous limestone (mostly). I ventured out today and photographed some rocks, as there are simply WAY more than I can bring into the house to study. I am wondering about this rock... According to what I have learned here, it is likely limestone with fenestella bryzoan and crinoid fossils? Oh, and the hitchhiker looks like some sort of insect. LOL It's well camouflaged, so you might have to zoom in to see it. If I am correct on this identification, the thanks goes to you guys! Ramona
  5. Petalodous Teeth

    To date, I've found 4 teeth, all in the same general area. One is shallow, the others are a big longer. The 3rd is a bit broken, I don't think I have a photo online right now of it. All are attached firmly to the limestone and I don't have any hope of ever getting them out clean. 1st Tooth: 2nd Tooth: 3rd Tooth No photos of this one. Sorry I promised 4 teeth, sadly only photos of three. 4th Tooth:
  6. Is it a fossil??

    Hi guys, Today I was going trough some old boxes of not very well preserved fossils and I stumbled upon this rock which i found before a few years in a limestone deposit on a fossil beach here in Bulgaria. (Echinoids and ammonites are common for this site). When I found it I thought it really resembled a fish spine, so I took it just in case it really was a fish spine (although I doubted it). So can anybody tell me if this is really a fossil of some sort or is it just some natural rock markings. Best regards to everybody!!
  7. Found this chunk of limestone at my Lake Michigan's sand depleted "beach". Due to the extremely high water level, storms have washed away pretty much all the sand at this beach, exposing the large underlying rocks. What do you think of the almond-shaped preservation of the interior parts, while most of the shells themselves have been dissolved away?
  8. Bianucci, G., Llàcer, S., Cardona, J.Q., Collareta, A. and Florit, A.R., 2019. A new beaked whale record from the upper Miocene of Menorca, Balearic Islands, based on CT-scan analysis of limestone slabs. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 64(2), pp.291-302. http://webaccess.igipz.pan.pl/archive/published/app64/app005932019.pdf https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7247/52c31e2013100da8d07eb1aaa4214f92f14b.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/332589581_A_new_beaked_whale_record_from_the_late_Miocene_of_Menorca_Balearic_Islands_based_on_CT-scan_analysis_of_limestone_slabs Many more papers about fossil whales at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alberto_Collareta Yours, Paul H.
  9. Carboniferous Limestone

    This piece of limestone looked like sea shells (clams or brachiopods) at first glance. However it’s one bumpy continuous surface. Any idea? The rock would be around 305 million years old. The rock broke easily along this surface which made it easy to see. Shells typically show white preserved Agagonite on them as well. No such preservation on this surface. Rock from Western Pennsylvania, United States. The surface is wet. Ruler is in inches.
  10. Help identifying poss fossil..coral? Texas

    My boss has a collection of fossils picked out of the Brazos river, TX. Most of his are pet wood/plant but this one perked my interest.
  11. I am trying to wrap my head around what these things looked like in "real life" so I can recognize them better. This is a limestone rock with what I think are fenestella bryozoan fossils, found in Huntsville, AL. Mississipian age. This photo is looking down at what I call the "top" of the rock. The next photo will be from the side, looking at the same area but from the "inside" of the rock. Can anyone point me to a site where I might find a diagram of these to better help me understand what they looked like? Thanks! Ramona
  12. This is my first post in the Fossil ID section - I am SO excited to find this resource! A have found a few very helpful folks in other places, but this group is a huge wealth of information! A bit of background - we moved into a house just outside of the city limits of Huntsville, AL, a couple of months ago. After finding a couple of fossils laying around in the yard, I decided to investigate the wooded area at the back of our property a bit more. Whoa!!! There is a creek bed on the property and the closer you walk to the creek the more rocks you have to walk over. Every single rock I picked up had some kind of fossil in it. The sides of the creek have rocks embedded in them, too. It seems like someone may have looked around a bit in the past (found a small pile of rocks) but many (MANY) of these rocks are in their natural state. Most of them, in fact. It seems overwhelming to me, but I have been delving into understanding the treasures I am finding. I don't understand all of the classification systems, but I found a place online that seems to indicate that we are in the Mississipian Age? The rocks which have been identified so far are all limestone, so I am assuming this one is limestone as well. The soil is VERY red (someone called it ochre red?) and some of it always remains on the rocks after I clean them. The fossils that have been identified so far are fenestella, bryzoan, crinoid. And I think the word fossiliferous was also used? I am a photographer by trade and macro photography is my FAVORITE, so I will post plenty of photos. This particular rock is a very small one compared to most of them. It is also harder than the other ones I have worked with - less "crumbly". The first couple of photos are of the top and the bottom of the rock, to get a general idea of the size and shape of it. The rest of the images are close ups of various areas. Any and all input is appreciated! Is it common to find an area like this where rocks such as this one are very abundant? From what I can tell these are all common fossils, but a great springboard for learning! Hints on how to clean and store the rocks appreciated, too, since there are so very many of them? Thanks!! Ramona
  13. Ammonites from Nigeria!

    Hi, everyone! Recently I got some ammonites from Nigeria, but I can not found any reference. So I have no idea how many species of them, I need your help!
  14. brachiopods Fossil

    Hi, another find this month. largest is 11 cm. appears to have more both front and back. limestone 2.3 cm x 2.3 cm x 0.80 cm or covers a U.S quarter. Found in West Michigan. Thanks, Bob
  15. Found this in Comanche Peak limestone formation in Central Texas. I'm thinking Eoradiolites quadratus but not sure if there's enough info to nail down species. Apex to apex measures approximately 1.5 cm for three different samples. I will slowly post more pics of the other specimens, as I reduce photo sizes without losing quality. Thanks for your help.
  16. Is this a fossil?

    Hi folks, I found this on Killiney Beach in Dublin, Ireland. I usually find fossiliferous limestone there full of crinoids and corals and other fragments. This caught my eye but I have no idea what it is. Any thoughts anyone? Sorry for the use of a 1 pence coin as a scale here, I just saw that using coins is not ideal but I am back in Ireland and the piece is at my home in London where I took the photos. Sylvana
  17. Acid Prep?

    I have found this coiled cephlapod in Pennsylvanian age limestone in Missouri. I believe it to either be a temnocheilus or cooperoceras. I was wondering if there is anyway to tell if this fossil was silica. And if it was could it be prepped by using acetic acid. TIA!
  18. Hi, I am Joel, I am completely new to this forum, and I came here because I need some help on something I have been absolutely fascinated with. At work in St. Louis, Missouri, the other day, I found on our lot what I believe to be a chunk of limestone approx. 5" x 2-1/2" x 1-1/2" thick which has some VERY interesting features on one side, and I have spent the better part of the last few days searching the internet for images of fossils that resembled anything on this rock - and aside from the little 'seashell' at the one end, came up largely emptyhanded. I am not sure if the lines on this rock are plant, animal, or possibly even insect. I am sorry to say, this rock was not found in it's native strata, but rather plucked from the building's low-maintenance landscaping - they used crushed limestone as a topping in some areas outside the building, and this one, owing to it's large size, stood out. How long it has been exposed to the elements, I don't know, but I was amazed at how crisp the lines were, with depth, and sharpness, they don't seem to have experienced much weathering at all. I tried photographing the lines to pick up on that detail - the sharpness, but couldn't capture it - not enough zoom. One small possibility, at one end of our building, there IS a limestone outcropping - perhaps one of my coworkers was strolling on the property one day, stooped to examine a rock (this rock) recently calved from that outcropping, and just happened to carry it back towards the door, and dropping it amongst all the other bits of crushed limestone? I took a ton of photos, picked the best, reduced them and uploaded as many as allowed. Can anybody even suggest what I am looking at, and where I might find more information? Any help at this point would be a godsend! Joel H
  19. Help me ID this

    I found this near a river in La Matea (Jaen, Spain) the zone is predominantly mesozoic and the rock is limestone. I'm not sure if it's a fossil or some kind of formation. I have two similar specimen, is like a cylinder that goes from one side to the other of the rock, in one of the images I've partially removed some of the rock. Thank you.
  20. Hi, a few days ago I went on my first ever fossil hunting trip to Eben-Emael, a Limestone quarry in Belgium that dates to the Maastrichtian and is part from the type location (the historical ENCI quarry being only a 3,5 km to the north. The trip was orginized by the BVP (Belgische Vereniging voor Paleontologie) and a short report of the trip with phot's and some of the finds can be found in this topic by @Manticocerasman who I was lucky enough to tag along with, cause I doubt I would have found many mention worthy fossils without the guidance of Kevin. But since I am into microfossils I decided to collect some samples of the limestone without the obvious fossils home to later be able to look for microfossils as it should be quite rich. I think I have around 1 - 3 kg of matrix left to look for microfossils. But I have never myself dissolved matrix, and although it seems easy, I don't want to make any mistakes. During the trip they advised me on two different approaches, depending on what kind of fossils I wanted to find. One approach was dissolving in water and the other in vinegar, but now the seeming obvious question. How exactly do I do that? Should I just take a bucket of a glass, fill it halfway with said liquids and just wait? Or should I use a sieve and lay the block there so only fossils remain in the sieve and the rest goes to the buttom. Does the limestone just dissolve or does some kind of putty residu where the microfossils will be in? If so, how to properly remove the fossils when you pour out the liquids without pouring out the fossils? I know I have many questions and some might be very obvious and straigh-forward, but I really haven't done this before and I would like to do it the right way from start. So thanks in advance for any tips & tricks, I would really appreciate any help!
  21. Found today on the English Yorkshire Coast ( Runswick bay). At first i thought it was maybe layers of a type of fossilised plant but I cant find anything to match the markings on this. Completely baffled by it. Looks very cool though. ID help, please?
  22. Please help me ID

    Hi There Team, i am new to fossils and new to this forum, I have found the attached and feel like its a fossil, What stikes me is the symetry with it and the gill like lines on both sides, Looked like a tooth to begin with but now im really not sure, I found this is New Zealand in Limestone. If any of you have any information i would really appreciate the help. Thank you very much.
  23. Burnt Cretaceous wood

    Hello everyone again. About a month ago, while I was fossil hunting in local Dallas creek, I came across what looked like a prehistoric burnt wood that has been exposed by creek water. When I looked at it, other half of the wood was missing and washed away. Other half was embedded into a rock as you can see on the picture, part of the wood was petrified and other half was in carbonized form. It smelt like sulfur / burnt wood. I dug it out and kept the wood in my collection, but some still remains in the limestone. It was very strange that single burnt fossilized log was embedded in the limestone layer and petrified like that. Has anybody seen something like this?
  24. North Central Texas Fossil?

    Just wondering if this is a fossil and of it is, what do you think it might be? Sorry I didn't have a ruler when taking pics. My thumb is on the pics and it's about an inch or a little less across. This was found in a limestone riverbed near Justin, Texas (North Central Texas). We have found many other smaller marine fossils (actually casts I think - I am not an expert by any means) that I am pretty sure are from the Cretaceous Period in the same area. I have more pictures that are higher resolution, but I can't upload them here due to the size restrictions. Thanks in advance for any info or ideas that you might have.
  25. claw or tooth ID please

    I think it was found in Canyon Lake TX- it should be limestone.
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