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Found 421 results

  1. Hello there! As it's getting nicer outside and things slowly turning back to normal, many of us are able to go out and enjoy the weather again. I journeyed to one of my favorite Burlington exposures just 10 minutes from my home. As it was so nice outside, I ran into a lot of friendly fishermen. Not unlike usual, its just me there for the fossils! My favorite spot I'm heading to has me walking a few miles before I start to hit the sweet spots. Along the few mile walk there, it looks like the beavers have been busy. You can tell as you approach the Burlington limestone alone by all the bits and pieces scattered along the nearby land. Today I decided to hunt the bank along the shore, and a layer about 10 feet above it. I have had good luck before finding some calyxs eroded out of the limestone by the waters edge, but the layer above requires splitting stone and further prep with air tools. All in all, I spent about 5 hours out fossil hunting. I've got about 75% of the finds cleaned up so far with the air scribe. Been cleaning as I go. A few of them still needs some scribe work, but I bagged a great variety! Species in the first picture. Crinoids: Azygocrinus rotundus, Uperocrinus pyriformis, Aorocrinus parvus, unknown species. Blastoids: Schizoblastus sayi Actinocrinites multiradiatus Very weathered Dorycrinus missouriensis (the famous 5 spined crinoid) Uperocrinus pyriformis Although the focus was on crinoids, I wanted to share my favorite piece of solitary and colonial corals found on the trip as well. I know some of you like pretty, sparkly corals. I like the crystalized caverns displayed in this one. And who doesn't like naturally exposed, colorful coral sections. That's all for this trip. I hope you all are able to get back out there, and enjoy yourselves and nature as soon as possible. Thanks for journeying along!
  2. Planning trip

    Hey everyone, was thinking about traveling to southwestern Wisconsin for some fossil hunting. I want to learn how to looking for trilobites.... but I have no experience over there. I prefer get together with someone for fun! Let me know. Send me message. Mike P.S. is midwestpaleo.com down for good?
  3. Strange hollow ball-like structures found in 80-million-year-old fossils by University of Western Australia https://phys.org/news/2020-05-strange-hollow-ball-like-million-year-old-fossils.html http://www.news.uwa.edu.au/2020051212074/research/strange-hollow-ball-structures-found-80-million-year-old-fossils https://scienceblog.com/516317/strange-hollow-buckyballs-found-in-80-million-year-old-fossils/ Uintacrinus - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uintacrinus Yours, Paul H.
  4. Cluster of crinoids?

    Hi thanks for taking the time to look at my post. Just for verification, I'm wondering if this is a group of crinoids in one rock? I found this near the Mississippi River in a Creek bed in Northeast Missouri. Thanks
  5. Crinoid

    Any clues to the genus of these crinoids? From Augusta, Iowa.
  6. Belemnites vs crinoids, tooth

    Found these tubular fossils in the Cody Shale in the Bighorn Basin or Wyoming. Friends state they are squids of some type. I can't find any type of belemnite that would fit the bill. Are these possibly crinoids? As for the tooth, found laying on top of soil in this Cody Shale...our friends state they have never found a tooth in this area prior. (see photos next post) Thanks, Dean
  7. I went on a bit of an unusual fossil hunt this morning--in my office closet. I'm getting things packed up for a move next month to Gainesville, FL. We're moving up there from South Florida because I've had my fill of hurricanes (and year-round yardwork). In Gainesville I'll be able to volunteer more with the FLMNH. So I'm slowly repositioning the contents of my house into a growing stack of moving boxes. I got to the bottom corner of my office closet today and found a box that had some childhood memories in them. No favorite stuffed animals, no catcher's mitt and baseball, no cheap trophies for athletic prowess demonstrated. Nope, this was MY childhood and it was slightly (or more so) more eccentric than portrayed in Leave it to Beaver. My childhood contained as many science books as comics or Mad magazines. I had access to my dad's workshop and knew my way around a soldering iron building kits from Heathkit (a reference that will mean little to those of a younger generation). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heathkit The box I found in my closet contained my first microscope--a simple little slide scope with a pair of AA batteries in the base for backlighting. It also had part of my childhood rock collection--some pyrite, a piece of green quartzite, an agate, and a heavy chunk of specular hematite (given to me my by 3rd grade teacher who knew I was a science geek). The best "discovery" was my nascent fossil collection. It had my first fossil book (copyright 1962): There were plastic bags filled with little scraps of poor quality fossils. I was living in Chicago at the time so my fossil horizon contained items mostly from the Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian. My 3rd grade teacher must have had a summer home up in the upper peninsula of Michigan (the likely source of the chunk of specularite) and she also gave me my first mystery fossil. It's a partial negative cast and I never could quite figure out what it was. I pressed clay into it as a kid to view its positive form and often suspected some form of trilobite. Could never make out any eyes on the end and looking at it now I suspect the "head end" may be some sort of pygidium. Maybe someone here may be able to hazard a guess. Several years ago Tammy and I visited the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in D.C. and of course spent an inordinate amount of time in the paleontology section. When I saw a nice example of a complete (and highly enigmatic) Recepticulites my mind went back to this piece that I found nearly 45 years ago. Most of the fossils that I collected myself were found wherever I had access to either beaches (like Lake Michigan) which had tumbled cobbles containing fossils or from a campground I remember a couple hours west of Chicago that used large rip-rap limestone boulders as erosion control where a road crossed over a large lake. So, in addition to bringing marshmallows for flambéing in the campfire in the evenings, and a fishing pole in attempt to see what types of fishes were hiding beneath the surface of the lake, I also brought a hammer and stone chisel--that's normal, right? I'd clamber around on the rocks looking for evidence of some poor quality fossil poking out here and there. I'd spend much more time than it was really worth freeing gastropod steinkerns, barnacles, crinoid stem segments, and other representative fossils of the time. I was always quite happy when I found find something that was included in my fossil guide book. Fossil books were few and far between in museum book shops and this was long before the ubiquity of the internet and longer before @Cris had the idea for TFF. I'll unpack this box again when we reach Gainesville and look back on my humble beginnings collecting fossils. I may organize some of these into a showbox display and hang it in my office in the new house. Back in the day I told (mostly adults) that I wanted to be a paleontologist when they asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. Not hearing the expected answer of teacher, fireman, or astronaut (this was the era of the space race), the questioner would stare blankly at me till my grandfather or my parents would explain that it is someone who "digs up fossils". It took me a few decades but I've finally been able to travel around and "dig up fossils" if only on a serious avocational level. You'll see some indications that I was trying to be a serious collector back then. I had numbered several of my finds when I had made a potential identification. I had a notebook (long since vanished) where I recorded the collecting information and (probably) identification for my finds. The little adhesive numbered tags were cut from strips of numbered tape used to identify both ends of cables when building racks of switches and relays (back in the day before semiconductors). I have my first specimens of a rugose horn coral, a faint brachiopod, a crinoid segment, and my first worn partial trilobite. I remember some of these fossils and some I've long since forgotten about but the one that was the most surprising to see while picking through my old collection was a reasonable example of a Mazon Creek fern frond. While this is a well known fossil locality here on the forum (and beyond), I was surprised by this as Mazon Creek and its fossil lagerstätte had escaped my awareness till about a decade ago. Tammy and I were visiting the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago with our nieces and we happened upon the great exhibit they have there on Mazon Creek. That was the first time I was conscious of the fact that there was a great place to collect fossils relatively close to where I grew up but that fate and the relative lack of information back in the day had hidden it from me. Had I known about Mazon Creek back in the day and been able to amass a more impressive fossil collection as a kid I might not have chosen computers for a career. Actually, computer programming came natural to me like walking or breathing so computers were likely baked into my fortune cookie of fate and interest in fossils would rekindle later in life as it has. I still have no recollection of how this Mazon Creek concretion came into my possession. I can only assume that I received it as a gift from some adult trying to fan the flames of a passion for fossils. With the possibility of a long-term time-delay fuse this effort seems to have worked. Think about that next time you gift some fossils to a kid who shows interest. Cheers. -Ken P.S.: Tammy thinks I should choose one of these as a last minute entry for the FOTM contest since I (re)found them this month.
  8. Crinoid

    Hi, does anyone know the species of this crinoid ? It was found in the Forest Marble formation of bathonian, Jurassic, UK. Thanks.
  9. Local finds

    We’re currently on lockdown but fortunately have a good stretch of river within walking distance. It doesn’t make up for not being able to get to the coast but it’s better than nothing. Picture 2 is a couple of possible crinoid stems that we found. Pictures 3 & 4 I think are some of the rugose coral that are pretty common round here. Does picture 1 look like it contains any evidence of fossil? I wasn’t sure enough to carry it home but left it somewhere I can retrieve it from later if it is fossil. Thank you in advance
  10. Lafayette, IN: New interest in fossils

    Hello! I am new to the forum and this is my first time posting. I am totally out of my element. I have 3 elementary school aged children and I want to incorporate fossil hunting and identification into our activities. We are all very interested! Can anyone give me any input on what resources I can look into? Any clubs, classes, recommended literature, what to do with found fossils (even display) etc. I am simply using google right now. I believe we found some horn coral and possibly crinoids, but there are others that I cannot find similar photos of. Also, should we clean fossils? Any help or advice is greatly appreciated! Note: bottle cap for size.
  11. Indiana fossil ID

    Found this in a wet creek bed near the Wabash River in Lafayette, Indiana, USA. Tippecanoe county mostly hosts crinoids, but I wondered if this hash plate also held a tooth. Many thanks in advance!
  12. Thats new to me.

    Nassoviocrinus costatus (Goldring 1954) I posted recently about our latest fossil hunt in the Devonian of NY and showed you all the little crinoid we found. Whenever I find one of these ancient echinoderms that Im not familiar with, I show it to my friend George McIntosh of the RMSC. I sent some pics to George and he told me that it looks like Nassoviocrinus costatus. I never heard of that crinoid before so I had to look it up and learn a little. However, Index Fossils of NA was published in 1944 and this crinoid was described in 1954 and the internet shows very little about it (mostly publications by George ). I also couldn't find anything in the Treatise about it. If you have any information about this crinoid, I would appreciate it (especially photos). I have plans on getting this prepped and I will post the pics to this thread instead of starting another/separate post about it. I think its awesome that you can collect at the same locality for years and years yet still discover something new and exciting. Happy Collecting
  13. Any IDs y’all can pick out on this rock? I think I see crinoid, but I’m extremely new to this and could use any and all help! Found in a creek on the Cumberland plateau in TN, SCOTT county. Thank you in advance!
  14. Planolites burrows?

    I went to the local outcrop in my hometown and found this matrix. At first I thought it was broken crinoid segments but after giving it two baths and two good scrubbing with a toothbrush, the details are much clearer and now I doubt it is crinoidal. Perhaps it is Planolite burrows? I think this matrix is of Longford Member, Kiowa formation, Albian. The outcrop I found this matrix at is mostly the Wellington formation, Permian; but it is topped by Kiowa formation and I found it near at the top of this outcrop. I would like to hear your opinions, thanks!
  15. Spring of 2020 We took advantage of the time off and the break in weather to hunt one of our favorite streams here in Western New York. This was just a spring scouting mission to see what was exposed after the ice and snow has melted. Some of the more interesting finds were a crinoid crown (very rare for this locality) possibly Logocrinus, Spinocyrtia granulosa open with both valves, Orthospirifer marcyi, a large Megastrophia concava cleaned by nature with epibionts, and 3 small nearly complete Greenops. We also found many small Favosites coral colonies, large Heliophyllum corals, and 8 different species of brachiopods. Happy Collecting!
  16. Crinoid segments or not a fossil?

    Found on blackstone river NWT Canada. Not sure what formation it is but its either devonian or cretaceous nothing between. My best guess is Fort Simpson formation so late devonian.
  17. Here I am again, with questions on another rock! I can recognize more and more fossils and rocks, but I love finding things I don't recognize. :-) This limestone rock, found in Huntsville, AL, as a portion that has a lot of quartz in it, and a lot of tunnels and crevices. I recognize the crinoid fossils but am not sure about some of the other ones. I have put questions marks on the areas I am wondering about, and asked a question in one image. It also almost looks like there are areas where geods were trying to form, but that may just be due to all of the quartz. Help appreciated! Thanks! Ramona
  18. Need ID Help please!

    I found this in a stream in central Missouri, USA. Not sure what it is... in the base it appears that a crinoid existed in it and that this may have been some sort of cap or stem from a crinoid- however I can't find any pictures of anything like this. Any help would be appreciated!
  19. Possible crinoid?

    While searching for fossils on Jebel Hafeet (a mountain in Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, UAE) my mother saw this little fossil sticking out of the rock face. I immediately thought it looked like a crinoid, which was odd since I have never seen one before in this country... I carefully excavated it and brought it home. I think that the fossil is about miocene age, but I am not completely sure, the round things surrounding the fossil are nummulites.
  20. Early Sea Life

    From the album My Collection

  21. Saturday we went back to the south of Belgium to check out the quarry where I like to hunt for goniatites. The last 6 months there was litlle activity in the quarry and I was hoping that things had changed by now and the would have dug further, but alas there stil was no change. Still the bad weather and the storms of this winter cleaned out a lot of debris, we did find some nice fossils. At 1 pm we had to give up searching and ran back to the car due to heavy downpour and wind. Start of the day, gray and windy , but still dry: ptospecting the rubble , the first fossils apear: A big goniatite in the mud: Carinoceras sp. some parts of the shell missing. peeking out of the dirt: A little game for the TFF members, find the goniatite: the 2 best finds of the day: From Natalie a cute piece of placoderm: For me, I picked up a crinoid calix, I still have to remove some of the sediment around it: And we brought this one home to show to@Tidgy's Dad a large brachiopod
  22. A couple of our more unusual finds in the Whitby area today, can anyone identify the first couple of items? The larger one has the striped (pyrite?) effect on both sides. Also, is anyone seeing crinoid or similar in the last two pictures? Same side of rock from different angles.
  23. I was wondering if there are ways to make out the difference between an isolatad crinoid and blastoid calix, what are the indicators?
  24. I'm not sure if folks would like to do this or not, but I thought it might be fun to have a run of "I Spy" with a large fossil-rich rock that I recently found in our yard. Experts and newbies both welcome! This rock weighs 4 pounds and measures about 6 inches by 5 inches. These are macro images - all from the same rock. Check them out and see what you can "Spy" in each image! Look closely - very closely! And think in 3-D format! ;-) A bit of background - this rock was found in Huntsville, Alabama and is likely mostly limestone. I mostly find fenestellan bryozoan, crinoid, and coral fossils, with a few bivalves. So, surprise me with what YOU see in these photos!
  25. Is this a crinoid stem?

    Is this a crinoid stem? If so, what is the exterior? Thx! From Kosciusko Co, IN.
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