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Found 27 results

  1. Is this a blastoid?

    I found this on partridge point in Alpena MI in Devonian limestone and have been finding crinoids and blastoids. I’m not sure what this is.
  2. A most unusual blastoid

    Hey everyone, long time no see! Last week, my historical geology class went on a field trip and did a little fossil collecting, so naturally I've had the fever ever since. A couple of days later I decided to hit a nearby roadcut and do some nosing around. After a few hours I had collected some very nice echinoderm material (including a nice Taxocrinus crown), some of which I am not totally familiar with. What I thought to be my most unusual find was this weirdo little blastoid. The first thing that struck me is the rust color, I've only seen this in my Floraville blastoids, and those are just slightly rust-colored, not covered head to toe like this little guy. You may not be able to see this in the photos, but there appear to be some pseudofossil markings on one side. Another strange characteristic is what I'm going to call the arrangement of the plates, could it be that this thing didn't get to 'close itself up' all the way before it was buried? (I do not study biology or paleontology so please stop wincing) If not, I'm wondering if I found one of the less common species of what I assume to be Pentremites. Of all the blastoids I've found, this one is probably the most unique, if someone could help me ID this thing it would be greatly appreciated! If additional photos are needed, I will gladly provide them. Thanks, Matt P.S. I apologize for the poor lighting in the photos (and for the lack of scale!), it's very hard to get a good picture in my half-subterranean apartment that only gets direct sunlight early in the morning. P.S.S. Hats off if you picked up on the Twilight Zone references.
  3. Plant fossil

    I have searched since I found this, to figure out exactly what it is. Nobody that I have talked to has been able to for sure ID it. I found it while searching for crinoid fossils at a beach near Michigan City, Indiana, in Lake Michigan. I was swimming around, picking up anything I found, taking a look, and I tossed this one up on the beach. We were guessing that it may be the bulb part of a crinoid, but I haven't found anything online that looks exactly like this one. We used dental tools to pick out some of the sandy stuff, so we could see more detail. My hand is not in the picture for size reference, rather, I had to hold it upright to get more picture angles. My mom took this fossil to a rock show, and people were amazed by it, though they couldn't identify exactly what it is. Some said it is a once in a lifetime find. If it can't be ID'd here, I will likely take it to the university I attend, or a museum. My dinosaur class professor wasn't entirely sure about it either. I would really like to know exactly what it is. Thanks in advance for any help! I look forward to contributing to these forums!
  4. Silurian blastoid

    I just relocated an unusual fossil that had been lost in some shoebox deposits. It appears to be a slightly crushed blastoid, but otherwise well preserved. It is pink colored and may be replaced with dolomite. I found it several years ago in Sumner County, TN at a place called South Tunnel. The site is a railroad cut exposing the Laurel Limestone and a few feet of Waldron Shale at the top, both middle Silurian in age. The rock had fallen out of the cut, but the extremely hard limestone looks like typical Laurel, a dolomitic limestone with very few fossils other than a few crinoid stem segments and the occasional brachiopod. I have been trying to identify it, but I'm not finding much info on Silurian blastoids. From my searches, there seems to be only one known blastoid species from the upper Laurel at St. Paul, Indiana, which is a Troostocrinus sp. Over several years of fossil hunting the area, I have never found anything even slightly similar in any Silurian deposits. Hoping someone here may have some idea what it is.
  5. Pentremites.jpg

    From the album Northern's inverts

  6. Devonoblastus whiteavesi.jpg

    From the album Northern's inverts

  7. I went shopping for a nice Cystoid (We don't have in my area as far as I know) - Bought a Holocystites scutellatus - When researching the taxonomy, Wikipemedia Commons gives the following: Regnum: Animalia • Phylum: Echinodermata • Subphylum: Blastozoa • Classis: Cystoidea • Ordo: Aristocystitida • Familia: Aristocystitidae • Genus: Holocystites Hall, 1864 Fossilworks gives: Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: †Blastozoa - Sprinkle 1973 Class: †Diploporita Superfamily: †Sphaeronitida Family: †Holocystitidae Genus: †Holocystites So - Is it a CYSTOID or a BLASTOID? Or is science not sure???? I bought another one that Fossilworks DOES classify as a cystoid. Did some reading... seems the fossils from this location are listed as Holocystites and Cystoids. Any insight here? I am trying to build a nice representative collection, so I can start identifying on my own... and try to study when I have the time!!! Dave Ruckser
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blastoids - Two Pentremites in Matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm.[1] Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million years ago. Although never as diverse as their contemporary relatives, the crinoids, blastoids are common fossils, especially in many Mississippian-age rocks. Pentremites is an extinct genus of blastoid echinoderm belonging to the family Pentremitidae. These echinoderms averaged a height of about 11 centimetres (4.3 in)but occasionally ranged up to about 3 times that size. They, like other blastoids, superficially resemble their distant relatives, the crinoids or sea lilies, having a near-idential lifestyle living on the sea floor attached by a stalk. They trapped food floating in the currents by means of tentacle-like appendages. Pentremites species lived in the early to middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 Ma. Its fossils are known from North America. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: †Blastoidea Order: †Spiraculata Family: †Pentremitidae Genus: †Pentremites
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blastoids - Two Pentremites in Matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm.[1] Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million years ago. Although never as diverse as their contemporary relatives, the crinoids, blastoids are common fossils, especially in many Mississippian-age rocks. Pentremites is an extinct genus of blastoid echinoderm belonging to the family Pentremitidae. These echinoderms averaged a height of about 11 centimetres (4.3 in)but occasionally ranged up to about 3 times that size. They, like other blastoids, superficially resemble their distant relatives, the crinoids or sea lilies, having a near-idential lifestyle living on the sea floor attached by a stalk. They trapped food floating in the currents by means of tentacle-like appendages. Pentremites species lived in the early to middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 Ma. Its fossils are known from North America. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: †Blastoidea Order: †Spiraculata Family: †Pentremitidae Genus: †Pentremites
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pentremites Blastoid echinoderm fossil Kentucky, USA Early to Middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 years ago Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm. Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million years ago. Although never as diverse as their contemporary relatives, the crinoids, blastoids are common fossils, especially in many Mississippian-age rocks. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Blastoidea Order: Spiraculata Family: Pentremitidae Genus: Pentremites
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pentremites Blastoid echinoderm fossil Kentucky, USA Early to Middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 years ago Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm. Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million years ago. Although never as diverse as their contemporary relatives, the crinoids, blastoids are common fossils, especially in many Mississippian-age rocks. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Blastoidea Order: Spiraculata Family: Pentremitidae Genus: Pentremites
  12. Nucleocrinus powelli REIMANN, 1935

    Found as surface float at the bottom of the Windom exposure. Reference: Wilson, K. A. “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York” (2014). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 44.
  13. Those of you with keener memories may remember that I posted about a trip to Sulphur, IN earlier this year. After that trip, I've been wanting to get back pretty badly, dreaming of finding another shark tooth. Columbus day and the cool weather got me back down there on Monday. Like a trained dog, I headed right back to where I found the tooth before, knowing that it was improbable that I would find another. Within 30 minutes, I came up with this: This appears to be a mostly present disarticulated trilobite. Any ideas as to species? My previous trilo tail was thought to be Paladins Chesterensis. This matches pretty closely to photos I can find of Paladins online. I proceeded to find a couple more trilo tail fragments. One was clearly just a small piece, so I left it. Another might have more of the trilo embedded in the rock, so I brought it home. It's tiny. My next significant find was the biggest blastoid I've ever seen. It outclasses my previous biggest by 1/4" in width. As you can see, the part showing out of the rock is an inch wide point-to-point. The rock it is embedded in is a bit thin, so it's possible that it's crushed/squashed out flat and wide, but the exposed portion doesn't show any breakage. It may also just have the back side broken off. I didn't find anything else real exciting. I picked up some more of the dime sized blastoids, I just can't help myself. (I'm also thinking of sending them in to my son's kindergarten class.) I also picked up a few 3d brachiopods, which you don't see a lot of at Sulphur. I did see where someone else had slid down the slope from the shale layer...quite a ways. The Sulphur site is not for the faint of heart.
  14. Here's my haul from the last Dallas Paleo Society field trip to an abandoned quarry in Gore, OK. The age of the site is Pennsylvanian, Morrowan stage. The hunting was a bit difficult, due to all the recent rains encouraging TONS of plant growth throughout the site. No telling what wonderful fossils were concealed by all of the weeds. Still & all, we all found some good stuff & no one ran afoul of any snakes. First up, the big draw of the site, a blastoid. I found this one lying on the path into the quarry. I think this might be a weathered horn coral. It wouldn't be a Pennsylvanian site without some crinoid stem pieces! A 'stick' of bryozoan! Brachiopod with a little bryozoan crust! Another brachiopod with a heavier coat of bryozoan (Continued... )
  15. My latest prize

    Yesterday (Wednesday--it's now after 1AM), my husband and I went out hunting with Mikeymig (hi, Mike! Thanks for the trip!). We were looking around a steep slope of Windom shale pieces (Upper Devonian). I was mostly looking for loose brachiopods and horn corals, both of which were fairly plentiful at this site. In one area, I noticed a cluster of small corals on the path at my feet, and stopped to pick them up. One of the smaller pieces was suspiciously round.... Blastoid! It's about 1 cm wide. Mike identified it for us as Nucleocrinus. Apparently, they're rare at that site. This is a first for me. I've never found a blastoid (or a crinoid calyx) before. And if I hadn't been looking closely at my footing, I probably would have stepped on it!
  16. The spring here in New York has been great for we who collect fossils. There wasn't much rain at first but we did have a couple good gully washers recently that cleaned up my sites. I have found a couple of surprises like a huge brach stuck in the middle of a small gully within a waterfall and a topnotch Greenops prepped by Brian Dasno of Watertown NY. I hope the summer of 2015 will be as giving as the spring has been. I hope you enjoy viewing my specimens as much as I have finding them. Thanks, Mikey
  17. The snow is finally gone but the water is still freezing. It was 70 degrees out and rain was on the way. I got out to one of my favorite places and found a couple neat things that I think some of you might enjoy. Thanks! We found this brachiopod (Spinatrypa) during a collecting trip on 4/2 and when we got home and washed the mud off, we found a blastoid. We would have never found this rare fossil if we didn't pick up the brachiopod. A couple nice brachs I found last Thursday in NY. The Megastrophia is 2.5" x 2.5" and the Spinocyrtia is 2.8" long.
  18. Blastoid

    From the album 2014 highlights

    Found near Lake Fort Gibson dam, Oklahoma

    © &copy 2014 Zach DuFran

  19. I'd heard this location had blastoids, which I've never seen before, so last Friday me and a friend headed down there. We arrived around 930 or so and were immediately stuck by the steepness of the cut "we have to go up this?". We got up near the top where the really productive layer is and immediately started finding blastoids, archimedes, and small horn corals. Most blastoids were in the 1/2" range, I found one archimedes that is around 6" in a slab. Buddy found one blastoid that is probably over 1". The horn corals are generally small. Lots of crinoid bits and pieces also. We took a break for lunch and when we returned we had company. On the west side there was now a man and his son. We hit the east side but it wasn't very productive. Dropped back down and the man & son were gone, but now there was an older lady with 3 young boys. We crossed over and said hi. They were looking for fossils on the very bottom layer, which is hard limestone and not very productive. The boys got very excited when they saw my rock pick and boots. I gave them some of the duplicates of everything I had picked up earlier. I told them the good stuff was up there. Things evolved and me and my buddy wound up taking the two older boys up the road cut to hunt. The boys were very polite, calling us "sir" the whole time. We spent around 30 minutes up high, with them finding several examples on their own. I ended up giving them my bottle of water because they were dried out. I was identifying what they were finding or debunking psuedofossils (lots of those when you're 10/13) the whole time. They eventually asked me if I was a scientist. Eventually grandma yelled up that it was time to go, so we had to get down. I think all the grown-ups were much more concerned about it than the kids. The 13 year old scrabbled down 3 steep 4' shelves in no time. But I slowed down the 10 yeard old, I was afraid he was going to fall. I ended up getting below him and lifting him down each shelf. He actually told me I was really nice. Overall a fun trip, if a bit short. It was made more enjoyable by getting to help stir an interest in science in some youngsters.
  20. Spent a few wonderful hours in Hungry Hollow today! Found numerous interesting specimens in the South Pit, 2 of which are these awesome Blastoids! I never get tired of finding these and I make it my goal to find at least one each time I am there. I did not find one the last time I was there but to make up for that, today I found 2! I searched the UMMP image archive to help me identify them but I can only accurately identify one of them. Devonoblastus whiteavesi (on the left) Can someone help me identify this one?? note the star design on the basal
  21. I went to the North Pit of Hungry Hollow for a few hours on Friday. I spent most of my time digging through the clay piles and walking around the water's edge, scoping out a few recognizable shapes that are by now completely camouflaged by the clay. It's amazing that my eyes even zeroed in on my tiny trilobites but I guess they had waited long enough for me to take them home, and today was the day! One trilobite turned out to be just the head but the other is pretty cute. I met one hiker from Pennsylvania (Greg) that came through the trail along the North side of the river. I introduced myself and we chatted for a few minutes. i always enjoy meeting tourists from different parts of the country. As I headed out, I decided to try the north cliff near the parking area and there I found a very nice Heteroschisma alatum (blastoid). It is about 1/4" wide and 3/8" long. In my pill bottle it went! I hope the photo is clear enough to see the detail. I got called back home or I would have stayed there a few more hours, even though the sun was beating down on me. Even one good find keeps me there longer than I anticipated! Incidentally, I went home with a large bag of garbage that I collected in the pit. I try to take anything out (cans, bottles, plastic bags etc) that I can, each time I go there and it always surprises me that I find more the next time I go. I hope people will be mindful that it's a privilege for us to be able to dig there at the generosity of the land owners. Please take your litter home with you. Detail is a bit clearer in the image above. I took the time to dig a few footholds so I wouldn't take a spill down the hill!
  22. Some great finds this week - 4 Blastoids in one day (Aug 4) and 1 on Aug 10. Found my very first one last week. Now I WANT to find them and that seems to be what my eyes focus in on. My OCD (just kidding) wouldn't allow me to go home until I found one on my Aug 10 fossil hunt. And lo' and behold, I did! Found some very cool assorted trilobite bits - I'm a newbie so all pieces of trilobite are intriguing to me, even bums! I can never pass up Cyrtinas, they're awesome! Found the biggest one so far in my collection... I found LOTS of other interesting things that I have multiples of. Some PERFECT brachiopods, large and small (not pictured). Can't leave them behind when they're that pristine. I'm still learning to identify fossils properly. I had the good fortune of having a fossil buddy along with me who is much more knowledgeable and a real gentleman. We braved the cliffs and got out alive. It sure makes for fun fossil foraging! Can't wait to go out again!!! I need a manicure!
  23. Can You Help Id This Blastoid?

    Found this on August 4, in the same general location where I found my first Hyperoblastus Nucriformis blastoid on July 31. I'm not even sure that it is a blastoid. Can someone help ID it for me? It is about half an inch long. It appears to be fragmented on the fat end... I found it near the top of the Arkona formation in the South Pit of Hungry Hollow. Lise
  24. Spent 4 wonderful hours in the North and South Pit of Hungry Hollow with some new friends! Found a wonderful blastoid (my first) - it is 5/8" long! I hope the photo does it justice. I need some practice!! Also found some new brachiopods I did not have before... several pretty crinoid sections, most of a trilobite, some great coral sections and some ammonites. Oh, and a nice button coral! Tim found a beautiful crinoid feather star.. not too sure what it is called. It was at least 3" long and 3" wide... I would include a photo here but it's not mine to publish so hopefully he will publish one! It's always great to spend time hunting fossils with people who appreciate them and the patience it takes to find them! I can't wait to get back out there!
  25. Mystery Blastoid From Arkona

    Hi all, It's been a while since I've posted but I recently took a trip up to Arkona for one last search before winter sets in. It was a chilly day with light rain in the morning but time flew by thanks to a surprise visit by Jschmo (Darrell). He's a great guy to collect with an very knowledgeable. He pointed out to me where the Microcyclus thedforensis level is in the Arkona Fm. and then I proceeded to find a couple dozen specimens. My find for the day is this crushed, 9.5mm long blastoid: Sorry for the lighting but as it's still raining outside from Sandy I took the pics with my Zorb Microscope camera. I'm not sure who it is so any suggestions are welcomed. -Dave
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