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Found 130 results

  1. Scelidosaurus: ready for its closeup at last The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than 150 years ago. University of Cambridge One of four newly published papers listed in the above article: Norman, D.B., 2020. Scelidosaurus harrisonii (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Early Jurassic of Dorset, England: biology and phylogenetic relationships. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Yours, Paul H.
  2. Dorset find

    Found this yesterday on the foreshore at Redcliff Point, Dorset. It’s mineralised; feels like rock and sounds like rock when tapped against another. Could it be a piece of fossilised wood, or even rib bone, or has some other process caused the appearance? Thanks for looking
  3. I took my daughter to the Natural History Museum in London last year and the highlight was seeing Mary Anning’s ichthyosaurs, so we’ve been planning this week away ever since. Unfortunately we haven’t found any bones yet but we’ve found a few nice samples that I’ll get up here once we’re home. Here’s a few pictures from today’s walk along Monmouth beach, hunting in the land of giants!
  4. Dorset Petrified Wood

    Found this sticking out of a mud slide near Golden Cap on the Dorset coast. Certainly looks like wood, it doesn’t feel as hard as stone but harder than wood, I suppose like coal. Is it definitely petrified and is anyone able to speculate on age, possible species etc? Thank you in advance
  5. Pyrite Ammonite?

    I know it’s probably pyrite but is the ammonite shape just a coincidence playing tricks on the eye, or could this actually be an ammonite? Found by my daughter today on Charmouth beach, Dorset
  6. I found these Jurassic ammonite fragments and belemnites near Seatown along the UK Dorset coast.
  7. Hello, new to posting on the forum and fairly new to fossil hunting. Found these very nice marine reptile vertabrae near Osmington Mills, Dorset. All found close together washed out of the Kimmeridgian Clay I think... Age: Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian? 163 - 152mya (both rock types there but I believe the clay cliffs above the beach are Kimmeridgian. Can anyone confirm I have 2 different types (Plesiosaur & Ichthyosaur)? Also any guesses at what species they are likely to be or is it not possible to narrow down from a more generic Ichthyosaurus sp./ Plesiosaurus sp. ? The "Plesiosaur" Vertebra, more chunky and flatter with pits on side. (Could this be a type of Pliosaur like Liopleurodon or Pliosaurus sp. ?)
  8. Ringstead bay Dorset fossils

    Hi guys, I recently bought these and I was going to put them in the mailbox score thread but a few of them were unidentified and a few others had suspect ID’s sorry that a few are upside down, I couldn’t figure out how to fix it
  9. Uk ammonites

    hi guys. sorry the pics are upside down but i wasnt sure how to turn them all the right way up 1.sphaeroceras brongniarti? that 's what it said on the label but it didnt look like that when i looked it up 2. i couldnt read the label as emillia want a species name i could find, any help would be appreciated
  10. Lyme Regis/Dorset ichthyosaurs

    I’ve been trying to find out what ichthyosaurs are found in Dorset, from the Lyme Regis, but I’m having quite a bit of trouble. I’ve found sites that list the species of different types of animals found at certain locations, but I can’t find anything like that about “Dorset” or “Lyme Regis”. At the moment I’m interested in finding out out the ichthyosaurs, but in the past I’ve looked for the same thing about plesiosaur/pliosaur, and croc species, so that would be great if anyone had information about pretty much any species of reptiles found there. Thanks very much for any and everyone’s time and effort! As always, it’s extremely appreciated!
  11. Mammal tooth

    Hi everyone, I recently found this tooth in some material i collected last month and I’m pretty sure it’s a tooth, maybe mammal. Can anyone ID it to a species or genus level? It was found in the bathonian forest marble formation of Dorset, UK. Thanks .
  12. Dorset fossil hunting trip

    So recently I took a trip to the Jurassic coast in the nearby county of Dorset and I decided to share it with you and record it which I haven’t done before. The location I chose was Bathonian, Jurassic and was the Forest Marble formation. I’m sorry if my fossils seem a bit crude because I haven’t cleaned all the rock off them yet. Most of the fossils in this location are found by either processing the rock or looking on the big limestone boulders which are crammed full of brachiopods and bivalves. As I said, there are plenty of shells but the eventual vertebrate remains do turn up. Particularly sharks, fish, reptiles, amphibians and I know that this location is famous for its mammal remains. Here is a picture looking towards Eype and Thorncombe Beacon and I think that’s Seatown, Charmouth and Lyme in the distance .
  13. GREAT charmouth hunt

    Hi, everyone I had a great hunt at Charmouth today and found a couple of rarer remains. I found two articulated Ichthyosaurus vertebrae almost as soon as I walked onto the beach and later on another bone that is probably Ichthyosaurus as well. Seldom do I find any decent marine reptile remains, so this was a good trip for me.
  14. A few of my ammonites collected from the Inferior Oolite at both coastal and inland quarry sites in Dorset, UK.
  15. My first post of a few fossils from my collection. This is a fish, found in a quarry in Swanage, Dorset, England, where the Intermarine Beds of the Purbeck Group of limestones are exposed, in order to extract building stones. These "Middle Purbeck Beds" are actually the Stair Hole Member of the Durlston Formation of the Purbeck Group, being deposited at Mediterranean latitudes in a vast system of brackish to freshwater lagoons and lakes. The shallow water limestone beds sometimes have dinosaur footprints on their upper surfaces. The photos show the two fish found (after prepping) which have been recently re-named Callipurbeckia (formerly Lepidotes) minor. The larger of the two is 27cm in length.
  16. Picked this up at Charmouth Beach (UK) where mainly marine fossils are found (ammonites, echinoderms etc) but not sure what this might be. It's hollow and the inside has the light brown bumpy impressions running all the way through. Any suggestions on ID are appreciated!
  17. Just got back from a trip to England - still fighting the jet lag a bit! 7 hours time difference makes for interesting sleep patterns! Thought y'all might want to see what I all I found in Great Britain! Of course, we started in London, doing all the London things, including the Natural History Museum! Got to see Mary Annings plesioarus and mosasaurs. And the archeoptyrix! And the dino room!! And much much much more.....whew. Left London to visit friends in Bury St. Edmund, near Cambridge. We went to see the Sutton Hoo burial near Ramsholt in Suffolk which I had heard of a fossil hunting spot there- didn't really get to look much because there was a boat burning at the docks.....so fire trucks and smoke and commotion. I found out later that the main hunting area was a 45 minute hike from the waterfront, so I kind of missed out. Wasn't really prepared to hike that far, with friends who aren't really into fossil hunting, so I contented myself with poking along the water front and found a couple of little things.... (not the shell, I found that embedded in the dirt at Framlingham Castle, not sure if it is a fossil or just a shell). I'm not really sure what any of them are, the bullet shape I was assuming was a cephalopod, but it might be a phragmocone and I really don't know what the little round one is, perhaps a vertebra? I didn't have a coin for scale, but the little round is 3/4 inch. Next on the fossil tour was Yaxley Hampton Vale lake near Petersborough. I had heard it was a good spot, if somewhat picked over, but I found it to be quite good! I didn't find any ammonites (which I was hoping for) or crinoids (although my friend who was driving found a HUGE crinoid stem - beginners luck, the rat). But found a nice sized belemnite, plus these those neat little white spicule things. I saw them ID'd somewhere a while back (sponges, I think) , but now I can't seem to find what they are called, so if you know, please let me know! A Swan at Yaxley: But the highlight of the trip was a guided tour around Weymouth, with the interesting and outspoken Adrian Davies! He picked us up and toured us all around Portland Island and Weymouth with info on the history of the town plus stops for fossil hunting! First stop was to a cobble beach with "roach stones"...what we in Texas call Rattlesnake Rock. My husband found a dolphin spine washed up (I really wanted to take some of the vertebra, but decided they might not let me back in the US)! You can see all the cobbles around the dolphin. My "roachstones" The view from Portland looking back toward Weymouth: And the best for last - my finds of ammonites (16 of which are pyrite!) , crinoids, belemnites, a phragmocone, a sponge and a bit of bone plus some other stuff: A few more pics of my finds: Me with my nose to the ground- it was a bit chilly and windy...and then I came home to the Texas heat.. And then a day later, I went to the Quarry at Midlothian on a 100 degree day. But that's another story.....
  18. Hi All! Just got back from a lovely trip to England and had a great hunt in Weymouth. Found this odd thing that I thought was a crinoid Calyx, but I am really not sure. I will eventually clean out the center, but was wondering if anyone might be able to tell me for sure what it is. Any help is appreciated! Thanks!
  19. Lyme Ammonite prep thread

    I have decided to do a live prep thread on a Dorset ammonite. The ammonite is roughly a foot across and is embedded in a big bit of matrix. I am exposing the ammonite using very basic tools, so fingers crossed I will post regular updates
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