Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'jurassic coast'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 36 results

  1. Intrigued

    I have come across a fossil and i’m curious to know a bit more about it with the help from you guys! Many thanks
  2. New 'sea dragon' species discovered by amateur fossil hunter off English coast By Jack Guy, CNN, December 10, 2020 The open access paper is: Jacobs, M.L. and Martill, D.M., 2020. A new ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaur from the Upper Jurassic (Early Tithonian) Kimmeridge Clay of Dorset, UK, with implications for Late Jurassic ichthyosaur diversity. Plos one, 15(12), p.e0241700. Yours, Paul H.
  3. Fossil ID please, U.K. Jurassic coast

    Hello, please excuse my lack of knowledge in this area. This is the first time we’ve ever hunted for fossils and while we have collected a lot of lovely ones we can identify, these we’re not sure of. they were found at charmouth and seatown in the U.K. we’ve started trying to use an engraver on the stone, we’re guessing ammonite?
  4. Preparation tips - newbie

    Hello everyone. I'm sorry to bother you. I have a few ammonites and ammonite impressions from a trip. I was wondering if you have any suggestions in how to clean them. I'm afraid of destroying them in the process. Thank you.
  5. Scelidosaurus: ready for its closeup at last The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than 150 years ago. University of Cambridge One of four newly published papers listed in the above article: Norman, D.B., 2020. Scelidosaurus harrisonii (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Early Jurassic of Dorset, England: biology and phylogenetic relationships. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Yours, Paul H.
  6. Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the crown and divide the tooth into labial and lingual parts While fine striations can be seen on one side of the tooth (presumably the lingual side), the other side (which would be the labial) seems entirely smooth - though some traces of rare striations can be seen on the photographs The striations are much more similar to those of crocodile or pliosaur teeth than to the plicidentine condition so typical of ichthyosaurs The horizontal banding on the tooth surface is unfamiliar to me with respect to most marine reptile teeth I have seen, but occurs much more frequently on crocodile teeth of various species I also bought another tooth with the same attribution from the seller, more or less around the same time. This one has no striations whatsoever, has a more rounded base, is less flattened and has a more rounded tip. It also has carinae. I therefore reclassified it as a probable Goniopholis sp. crocodile tooth. Now I know that not having the root makes it more difficult to identify this particular specimen, but I was hoping someone on this forum might be able to help me, as currently it goes without label. I've considered crocodile, plesiosaur and even pliosaur, but all of these have some reservations that prevent final classification. For one, none of these groups have teeth that are typically flattened like this, nor do plesiosaurs (sensu lato, thus including pliosaurs) have carinae. Crocodiles, then again, would either have or not have striations all around the tooth. And what to make of the banding: is this just preservational, or does it reflect the internal structure of the tooth - i.e. outcome of the tooth's ontological growth? Tooth measures 18 mm and is missing the tip. Thanks in advance for your help!
  7. Is this a fossil?

    Hi all. I picked this up on a dog walk yesterday by Chesil Beach in Weymouth UK. I regularly see belemnites, amonites, sea urchins etc but don’t recognise this. I don’t even know if it is a fossil or a bone or piece of coral. It certainly doesn’t feel like bone. It’s more of a stone / pumice consistency. Can anyone help me identify it please?
  8. UK Ichthyosaur or Pliosaur Tooth

    Hello, I recently got a hold of this tooth from an old collection in the UK. I am unsure if this tooth wouldve come from a ichthyosaur or a pliosaur since the root is absent and I'm not expert in this material, so any feedback that help figure this tooth out is appreciated.
  9. ammonite identification

    Hi, my son and I have a large collection of fossils, some of which we found ourselves on the Jurassic coast of England. As we are now mostly confined to our houses here we were hoping to better document our collection and we were hoping to put the correct names to them all. To start I was hoping that someone could help us out by identifying which ammonites these are. They were all found in Lyme Regis and they are all preserved in iron pyrite. Thanks.
  10. Dear Fossil-Community! Maybe you could help me identifying a strange object I've found at Charmouth Beach (Jurassic Coast, Dorset, United Kingdom) in December 2019. It is about 10cm long, covered in fool's gold and weights 172g. Its edges are quite straight, but on the narrow sides you can see foldings. I've attached some photos to this thread. Do you have any idea what this object could be? I am very thankful for your help and any suggestions. Kind regards Bernadette
  11. Picked this up at Charmouth Beach (UK) where mainly marine fossils are found (ammonites, echinoderms etc) but not sure what this might be. It's hollow and the inside has the light brown bumpy impressions running all the way through. Any suggestions on ID are appreciated!
  12. Hey all! I was visiting the Jurassic Coast in Devon yesterday and found these 3 fossils (I think) under the rocky cliffs on Lulworth Cove in Devon, England. ..does anyone know what they might be please? I have labelled each one 1, 2 and 3 and number 3 has 3 pictures attached; 3a,3b,3c. Unfortunately this is larger and a more difficult shape of rock to photograph. any help or advice on the ID of any of these would be great. PS. I am an amateur and have no idea if they even are fossils, but it would be exciting if they were. Thanks again for any help!
  13. Hi everyone! Last week I went camping for 3 days with my cousin and her parents in Lyme Regis (first time on the jurassic coast) and managed to persuade them to join me in a little fossil hunting! On the first day we went to Lyme Regis beach and to cut a long story short, we had no luck. all I found was half of a compressed ammonite in the shale which I then realised I lost when we got back to the campsite! I wasn't bothered though as the shale is so crumbly that it would not have lasted very long anyway. We did however have a really nice time on the beach and saw lots of huge ammonites in the rocks and the ammonite graveyard which was amazing. The next day was allocated to the museum and looking around the fossil shops. Of course I would have loved to have spent the day searching for fossils, but I only tagged along to this holiday! On the last day we went to Charmouth beach in the hope of better luck. My hope was diminished when we saw the hundreds of people all traipsing the beach looking for fossils. A lot of them had hammers and seemed to be hammering indiscriminately at rocks however, and most of those looking on the beach were just walking and staring at their feet. It became obvious quite quickly that this was not an effective method at this site and so I spent that day on my hands and knees. Belemnites were abundant (I really should have stopped picking them up but I couldn't resist) as were tiny ammonite fragments. I only found 3 nicely exposed whole ammonites though and one encased in rock (I might buy some tools to prep it myself - just got my university scholarship money, why spend it on fees!) And then came the excitement: all the previous week I had been preoccupied about this trip to the Jurassic coast and the odd chance of finding an ichthyosaur vertebra, without ever thinking I would. But, a few hours into the trip, what should I see laying on the ground by my feet? An ichthyosaur vertebra!! I just grabbed it and had to sprint back to my cousin down the beach to show her! It more than made up for not finding a larger or more complete ammonite. All in all we had a great time, I can't wait to go back! Some of my nicer finds Some bivalves My only nice whole ammonites Ammonite fragment filled with crystal, there's a lovely ring of golden pyrite showing around the crystal too Crinoid stems The ichthyosaur vertebra!
  14. I have recently been exploring what is know as the Jurassic coast portion of North Yorshire UK. After finding ammonites in abundance I stumbled upon what appeared to be a vertabrae looking piece of rock. Parts that are exposed like the ends of the rock appear slightly porus like fossilized marrow. Waves often erode the sides of the cliffs exposing new fossils in this area. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify if this is actually a fossil and if so what sort of prehistoric beast it could have come from and if it is not thanks for your advice and hopefully better luck next time!
  15. Ichthyosaur paddle bone?

    Hello everyone! I recently picked this item up. It was labelled as a ichthyosaur vertebrae, however I just couldn’t shake the feeling it wasn’t. I purchased it and have done some comparing to my other specimens and looking through my textbooks. I’m thinking it could be a paddle digit. The way the lines of the bone sprawl out from the centre rather than the ring formation of some of my vertebrae. Of course I could be completely wrong but there’s always that thrill of the unknown. I’ve compared it to a partial paddle I have and a humerus I also have in some photos to give an idea. Hope someone can help. Kind regards Ryan
  16. Can anybody identify this fragment I found at Ringstead Bay, Dorset, UK a few years back? I thought originally it was either a piece of bone or ammonite fragment, any advice would be much appreciated. The location is along the Jurassic Coast and would assume it was Jurassic in age.
  17. Lyme regis vs Charmouth

    Some of you have probably heard of Lyme Regis in Dorset but less of you have heard of Charmouth(the coastline east of Lyme Regis). This topic will cover which one is better for fossil hunting. In Charmouth the common fossils are fools gold ammonites(which can be picked up just by walking along the beach),belemnites, beef rock ammonites, coprolites(most unidentifiable), random marine reptile bone fragments(usually ichthyosaur). The rarer Charmouth fossils are complete marine reptile bones. The incredibly rare fossils are Scelidosaurus(a primitive armoured dinosaur) bones. In Lyme regis the remains are almost the same but no Scelidosaurus and instead there is a possible species of Megalosaurus and rare sea urchins(these might also be in Charmouth). Unlike Charmouth the "common fossils" are not so common. My opinion is that Charmouth is better. But I am interested to hear other opinions. PS- Sorry for the lack of pictures and the large amount of brackets.
  18. How a poor Victorian woman became a legendary fossil hunter Mary Anning was renowned as a ‘geological lioness’, with her discoveries including the first complete plesiosaur fossil. Now, centuries later, her town of Lyme Regis is putting up a long overdue statue of her, The Independent, November 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/mary-anning-fossils-palaeontology-lyme-regis-women-geology-statue-victorian-era-a8617936.html Yours, Paul H.
  19. Fossil collector rescued after becoming trapped by landslide Fishermen dig injured man out of mud before he is airlifted to safety The Independent, November 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/fossil-collector-trapped-mud-landslide-cliffs-port-mulgrave-yorkshire-a8605461.html Yours, Paul H.
  20. Hi folks. spotted this on a recent holiday in the UK to the south coast ( Dorset - the Jurassic coast ). the rock was approx. 250kg and I got it down to 80kg to get it in the car. the reason was I noticed this strange raised disc edge shape within the rock which does not appear man made. the rock is extremely hard. I plan to start removing the rock to expose more of it as I'm curious. any ideas as to if this is even a fossil and if so what it could be.
  21. Lyme Regis Trip

    Hi All, Spent a few days down on the Devon/Dorset coast with family. Plan was to fish and fossil hunt over the period. Got to Lyme Regis nice and early on the Friday and still didn't beat the crowds. Found a few Pyrite Ammonites (of which the photos i will attach later) but nothing else of major significance. Went back on the Saturday and had a rummage around in the loose material on the beach slightly away from the crowds. Found a single Ichthyosaur vertebra under a large rock, then a small piece of paddle bone in a rock pool, and lastly and my favourite half a larger vertebra with other bones in matrix just laying out in the open!! To say i was happy is an understatement! It was very busy down there so i think i got very lucky to find these. Apologies there is no scale on them. Hopefully my hand will suffice! I am planning to get the larger find prepped to remove some of the matrix, if anyone can recommend someone in the UK who can do it that would be brilliant, please send me a message. Thanks for reading.
  22. Hi all, I will be visiting the UK soon and am looking to acquire some UK fossils, particularly from the Jurassic Coast. Is there anyone I could approach for help on this? Thanks, Jay
  23. I found this object last week near Cayton bay, (Jurassic Coast) UK. It was sticking out of a cliff face. I don't know if it is just a water-worn 'stone' or something more interesting. I have attached several photos from various angles. Would anyone be able to tell me if it is something fossilised or, should it simply be adorning my rockery? Regards, Alan.
  24. ID help please

    Could somebody please help me, I went fossil hunting on The Jurassic Coast in Weymouth called Charmouth Beach. We found this and I’m unsure what it is. I have tried to remove some of the stone surrounding but struggling. I’m concerned I’m going to damage it. It appear to be a bronze colour when I clean it. I hope someone can help, thank you
  25. Lyme Regis find

    Hello, my first post so thanks in advance to all of you who look at novice finds and tell us, with great patience, what we've found. I found this on the beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in what I think is the Black Ven, The stone cleaved easily enough with a butter knife and this was revealed. The coin in the photos is a UK 5p piece and the fossil measures approx. 15mm X 8mm Thank you Simon
×