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Showing results for tags 'ptychodus whipplei'.



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Found 9 results

  1. Can you find the shark tooth? (10)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    I realize that a lot of my in situ shots are of ptychodus, but they seem to be more visible and photogenic. Taken 12/31/19.
  2. I recently took my 9-year-old daughter hunting at Post Oak Creek in Sherman, TX. We collected these about 200 meters upstream (NW) from the S. Travis Street Bridge. While she did not enjoy the bugs and frogs, we both had a blast finding shark teeth and other cool stuff. It was our first trip fossil hunting and I am complete uninitiated in identification. Can you guys take a look at these and let me know what's a fossil and what's a pretty rock? Trust me, she will be perfectly happy if they are all just pretty rocks. Besides what's pictured, we found about a dozen shark teeth and endless oysters. My goal for this post is to be able to more efficiently and accurately sift/sort through gravel the next time we go. Here is set 1. Item number 2 looks like a grinding tooth? Number 3 has a tooth shape, but no distinct edges. Number 5 looks almost like a coral growth. 6 looks like agate mixed with other stone.
  3. Can you find the shark tooth? (7)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    A large and complete P. whipplei tooth. (There may be one more ptychodus on the far left that I missed .) Collected 7/18/19.
  4. Ptychodus whipplei tooth detail

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of P. whipplei. Collected 6/21/19.
  5. Ptychodus whipplei tooth wear

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    This P. whipplei tooth was well used. Collected 6/21/19.
  6. Can you find the shark tooth? (5)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of P. whipplei. Collected 6/21/19.
  7. Can you find the shark tooth? (3)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of P. whipplei. Collected 6/21/19.
  8. We completed our first trade on the fossil forum recently and it was awesome. We got a great fossil and a cool new friend. I am putting up one of my Stethacanthus altonensis teeth because I want to bulk up our shark education program just a bit. It is really the only tooth we could trade that has much appeal. Here are the details on the teeth we have to offer. I actually think this one of our anvil shark teeth. This one is smaller but has the tip intact. The details Stethacanthus altonesis Delaware Creek Member-Caney Shale Formation Mississippian-Meremacian Pontotoc County, Oklahoma We can also offer some trade filler too but none of it rare or anything. PM if you want pictures of these teeth. 2 Isurus planus teeth from Sharktooth Hill Miocene 1 Ptychodus whippeli from Texas. i have no other information about the tooth. 1 Cretaceous Shark indet tooth from New Jersey ( I think). Scapnorhynchus was the leading opinion when it put it on the TFF for ID. It was not a unanimous opinion though. We are looking for specific things to fill in our education presentation about sharks. Astercanthus teeth and spine. Any Hybodont shark would work but in a perfect world we find an Astercanthus sp. Caseodus tooth Campodus tooth Cardabiodon tooth Feel free to say hello if you are interested. In pic 3, the trade tooth is on the right.
  9. Our last post ended with goblin sharks and the next era up in the presentation is one of my favorites. We get to the large sharks of the Cretaceous. This is also where the adaptations get more specific and where the science gets more heavy duty for the kids such as discussing regional endothermy. I am a firm believer than you do not "dumb down" complicated science to elementary students. You simplify and explain, you do not dumb it down. First up are the giant crushing sharks, Ptychodus. We present both P. mortoni and p. whipplei though most of the discussion is about mortoni. The kids will learn that there were at least 22 species of Ptychodus sharks, they are Hybodontid sharks and they were found in many locations around the world. They were plentiful in the Western Interior Seaway. They were large, probably very slow swimming bottom dwelling invertebrate eating specialists. We imagine them as looking similar to giant nurse sharks with features of the hybodonts. The focus is on those teeth and we have quite a few to show the kids. We explain how the separate teeth formed a plate like dentition for crushing shells. Next up is one of my favorite sharks, Cretoxyrhina mantelli. The Ginsu Shark gives us the rare chance to really described a prehistoric shark without theorizing much. The fossil record has been generous and this is a very well studied shark. We will explain to the kids that these were large sharks, up to 26 feet, and they looked very similar to modern Great Whites in general appearance. Despite being smaller than some of the monster marine reptiles, they were an apex predator. The key adaptation is the regional endothermy. For kids this goes like this... They had red muscles closer to the body axis and specialized blood vessels that allow for heat exchange. This means they were in a sense warm-blooded and this is a trait seen in modern sharks like Threshers, Makos and White Sharks. They could tolerate colder water than other species and were probably extremely fast sharks. I think the kids will get this concept and they will think this was one cool, though also kinda warm, shark lol At some point, I would love to add Cardabiodon to the program but have not seen around for sale so I assume they are rare and likely expensive. Anyway, the fossils for the program. Pic 1 One of the Ptychodus mortoni teeth we have from the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas. We have six and several are partial but put them all together in a Riker mount and they look pretty good. Pic 2 Ptychodus whipplei teeth from Kamp Ranch formation. We have a small assortment of these teeth and use them in the lab and as giveaways too. Pic 3 Cretoxyrhina mantelli from the Niobrara Chalk. Not the biggest tooth out there but one that I am very thankful to have. I will add more of these as we go along mostly because I love this species !!
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