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Found 52 results

  1. T rex skeleton in 3D game

    I originally came up with this idea after thinking of making a video about Stan the T rex but then decided to try to build a full fledged model of a T rex. Since I have no modeling experience at all,I decided to build it in a pretty popular game,notice one block equals to 12.666cm. After finishing it it looked familiar but not the typical t rex type,if anyone would have any suggestions feel free to tell me.Also tell me if it looks like another theropod cause this is reminding me of something else
  2. Hi, I have now corrected my previous post to avoid breaking the rules. I saw this recently and it actually seems too good to be true. I suspect that it may be false, as the stone that contains it does not look very natural in color, although the skeleton looks quite good. if you could comment on that it would be great.
  3. Tyrannosaurus rex serrations collage

    From the album Dinosaurs

    To me, serrations are such a fascinating tool. They were independently evolved many times in many different animals. They concentrate force into smaller points (increasing the pressure = Force/Area) so that the thing being bitten would break or cut along the line of serrations. They also are great for "sawing" through things such as muscle. T. rex definitely made great use of this adaptation. Topmost (greyscale) image from "Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex:" https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249649164_Physical_evidence_of_predatory_behavior_in_Tyrannosaurus_rex Most of the pictures (color) in this collage are from two associated fragments of what I am certain was a T. rex tooth from the Hell Creek Fm., SD based on the size and shape of the serrations. The images with the scale markings have been scaled to match each other. More on theropod serrations: "Developmental and evolutionary novelty in the serrated teeth of theropod dinosaurs:" https://www.nature.com/articles/srep12338
  4. Stan T. rex tooth replica (2)

    From the album Dinosaurs

    Closeup shot of the distal serrations.
  5. Stan T. rex tooth replica (1)

    From the album Dinosaurs

    A high-quality replica of Stan's 2nd maxillary tooth. About 11.5" in length. Displayed with a 3D-printed stand I designed.
  6. T. rex tooth chunk

    From the album Dinosaurs

    A small piece of (probably) rex tooth from the Lance Creek Fm., WY. Shown next to a replica for comparison.
  7. Juvenile nanotyrannus and T Rex

    Hi all! I just obtained an 8 mm juvenile T. rex tooth and have compared it to my 13 mm juvenile nanotyrannus tooth. Even though they are located in different positions in the jaw, there is a remarkable difference in the two teeth. I just don’t understand how these cannot be two different species?! The debate goes on...
  8. Predation Fossil

    Hi All, This is suppose to be a hadrosaur toe bone that has evidence of predation. Looks like big claw gashes, maybe ungal claws from a Rex? Please comment on your thoughts? Enjoy!
  9. Well the Tuscon fossil show is just a few days away and I'm already getting calls from sellers wanting to get together this weekend. Hopefully the show will be full of cool displays and will pass on a few of those images next week. But here we are week 3 in the new year so lets begin with this weeks show. An almost complete hatchling specimen of the basal sauropodomorph Mussaurus patagonicus from the MacnVp colletion in Argentina. This specimen is from the Early Jurassic of the Argentinian Patagonia Courtesy, Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Argentine Museum Skull is in top right. A couple of photos of the T rex Scotty Now this is a T rex tooth, one of the best I've seen and gotta like its size Femur Another T rex specimen this one Burke's Museum... they say " can you believe that the humerus (upper arm bone) of a T. rex is nearly the same size as yours? " Pretty rare specimen, not a lot around From the NHM Dino lab The weird Triassic herbivore Pisanosaurus in the PVL collections. Based on a single partial skeleton discovered in the Ischigualasto Formation of the Ischigualasto-Villa Unión Basin in northwestern Argentina Also from the NHM Dinolab : Coloradisaurus is a genus of massospondylid sauropodomorph dinosaur. It lived during the Late Triassic period in what is now La Rioja Province, Argentina. It is known from the holotype PVL 5904, nearly complete skull. The recently-named Cryodrakon boreas was one of the largest-ever flying animals, with an estimated 10-meter wingspan. This tibia contains a tooth left behind by a scavenging dromaeosaur. Courtesy Royal Tyrrell Museum. Now thats a cool specimen... These beautiful feet belong to a nearly complete specimen of Saurornitholestes, from Alberta. Courtesy Mark Powers
  10. Is this really a Tyrannosaur metatarsal as it says? I’ve been hunting something really nice from a Tyrannosaur (T Rex)
  11. Various drawings

    Two T rex, some hippo bones and a few designs that aren't strickly paleoart but I hope are okay to post nonetheless!
  12. Theropod Femur ID

    Hello All, This is for @Troodon and all other theropod experts. I recently acquired this Femur that is 20 inches and reportedly T rex. I have seen similarly sized nano femurs and this one is more robust and thicker. Polling the community to see it you all think this is Rex. Also, What is the material in the center? It is dark brown and runs the entire length of the bone (the cross section pic has white adhesive on the material in question). Marrow? Matrix? I have sent these pics to Pete Larson and he is MIA (no response yet). Hoping you all can end my debate. Thanks
  13. T Rex bite article

    An article discussing research on T Rex skull and jaw anatomy and implications for "bite." https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/09/t-rex-bite-could-have-crushed-a-car-thanks-to-its-stiff-skull/?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=Science_20191002&rid=68DAEDD7EC7A307D1290E5C3629C1CCF
  14. Hello All! I am lucky in that I have two T Rex Toe bones to decide from. One is of an adult (5 inches and heavy) that may have pathology on it. Perhaps bitten and as such healed itself "gimpy" (top right). There is erosion through the bone and so the definition is much less. And it is possible that the loss of the section is to erosion but the collector believes there to be pathology. The other is a juvenile toe bone (3 1/2 inch). It is in great condition with good definition. Irrespective of the price, I am interested in you all helping me decide which one to choose. Thanks!
  15. My New T Rex Tooth

    Just got back my online purchased T Rex tooth. Bought it last month and then sent it off to my prepper to do some minimal clean up/work. It's back and so excited for you all to see! The tooth is 3.6 inches and is a shed maxillary tooth with a small piece of the root. It has great serrations and I especially love the worn tip. This tooth did some work! The person selling it obtained it from Hell Creek but thought it was a BIG nanotyrannus tooth. I paid a premium for a nano tooth but definitely cheap since it turned out to be Rex. I told him it was Rex after I received it and he was happy nonetheless. Special thanks to @Troodon for the advice given.
  16. I am in the market to buy some dinosaur eggs and want to make sure these are real before buying them. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all in advance! I can get more/better pictures if needed.
  17. I recently saw this 2.5” tooth labelled as Tyrannosaurus rex from the javelina formation in Texas. How does it look? I am under the impression that this is very rare so please correct me if I’m wrong.
  18. T Rex Anyone?

    I see on every one's favourite auction site there is a baby (young) T-Rex for sale. Not without controversy. A bit more info here: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/apr/16/baby-t-rex-for-sale-online-paleontology-outcry
  19. Hello All, I'm new to fossil collecting as well as this forum. I'm looking to pick up a T Rex tooth and came across the one in the attached images. I'm just wondering if you could help me verify that it is genuine? It comes from the Hell Creek formation so I believe it is, I just wanted to be sure. Also, if anyone has any reputable sources for T Rex teeth, that would be great to know as well (PM). Thanks in advance!! -Derek
  20. T rex tooth prep

    I have a chance to acquire a nice T rex tooth that is 3.5 inches in length. It was found in multiple pieces under plant roots and the pieces have all been reattached with cyanoacrylate and very stable. Who can I use as an expert prepper to fill in cracks, possbily, to bring it back to its glory? Thanks in advance
  21. Hey guys, Over 4 inches and was discovered in the famous Hell Creek formation
  22. T-rex tooth fragment

    From the album Fossil Collection

    Tyrannosaurus rex tooth fragment from the Hell Creek formation.
  23. Tyrannosaurus Rex tooth fragment (serrations)

    From the album Dinosaurs

    Closer view of serrations.
  24. T Rex? Please Identify This Tooth

    Hey everyone, Can you please identify this tooth. It was found in the Hell Creek Formation And is 0.42 inches long. I think it is T Rex, but can’t be sure. Please Help! Thanks! -FossilsandScience
  25. Baby T. Rex petrified

    Here are pictures of my baby t rex. The skull seems to match with sues very well. You can clearly see the spine and legs as well. Picture 1 is the belly and hind left leg and pubic region. Pic 2 is top view with head closest to u. Pic 3 is side profile. I used red light to highlight the features
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