Jump to content
Bobby Rico

Micro matrix of Rattlesnake Creek

Recommended Posts

caldigger

My expert ID is "mostly stuff not found in my Miocene matrix".  :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
3 minutes ago, caldigger said:

My expert ID is "mostly stuff not found in my Miocene matrix".  :P

Your matrix stuff pretty good too. My photos came out ok I think a couple of the teeth are only 2mm. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico

 If you have a few minutes free from your mineral mine. Could you please have a look.thank you @ynot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

What a nice lot of different bits and pieces. 

I love going through micro matrix; great fun! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
1 hour ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

What a nice lot of different bits and pieces. 

I love going through micro matrix; great fun! :)

It is quite addictive .  :dinothumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico

Zoomed in on 14

 

B178F4FF-D1BB-4FE9-B86E-E7F35D096F36.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

I'm rubbish on the smaller shark teeth and other than very distinctive ones like tiger shark, sand tiger, or nurse shark--I'm little use in giving proper identifications to those. I generally consider most some form of gray shark (Carcharhinus sp.) tooth or Lemon Shark (Negaprion sp.). There is enough variation between upper and lower teeth and various tooth positions that I end up confusing myself and second guessing whenever I try to ID those. Here are some that I can provide a more reasonable identification for from the batch:

 

#7: Eagle ray tooth plate (Aetobatus sp.)--the curvature sets it apart from Myliobatus sp. cow nose rays which are straight.

#8: Partial Aetobatus sp.

#9: Slightly broken Myliobatus (see above) tooth plate photographed with the root side up--the smooth side is the occlusal (crushing) surface.

#10: Worn stingray (Dasyatis sp.) tail spine (barbs on sides are worn away).

#11: Possibly burrow cast (trace fossil).

#12: Looked like a piece of pufferfish mouth plate in the group shot above but seems to be a broken end of an eagle ray mouth plate (Aetobatus).

#13: More basal section of a stingray tale spine--thicker medial section with thinner sides is characteristic.

#14: Pinfish tooth (Lagodon sp.)--the bifid tooth shape is diagnostic.

#16: Gastropod steinkern (internal shell mold)

#17: Fish spine (possibly modern)

#18: Interesting calcitic marine fossil--possibly echinoid spine (open to be educated on this one). :)

#19: More gastropod steinkerns

#20: Looks to be a bone fragment--likely unidentifiable unless someone has seen one of these before. @old bones

#21: Modern freshwater gastropod (snail)

 

I'll let someone else tackle the shark teeth. ;) "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than open it and remove all doubt." -Mark Twain

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico

@digit thank you Ken that is a great help. I will look forward to looking up them IDs and learning something new.

 

cheers Bobby 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit
Just now, Bobby Rico said:

I will look forward to looking up them IDs and learning something new.

For me that's the second best part of any fossil hunt. Best part is the adrenaline rush when you find something new and unknown. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger
5 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

 If you have a few minutes free from your mineral mine. Could you please have a look.thank you @ynot

I would think his crystal mine has been under snow for quite some time. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot
6 hours ago, digit said:

 

#7: Eagle ray tooth plate (Aetobatus sp.)--the curvature sets it apart from Myliobatus sp. cow nose rays which are straight.

#8: Partial Aetobatus sp.

#9: Slightly broken Myliobatus (see above) tooth plate photographed with the root side up--the smooth side is the occlusal (crushing) surface.

#10: Worn stingray (Dasyatis sp.) tail spine (barbs on sides are worn away).

#11: Possibly burrow cast (trace fossil).

#12: Looked like a piece of pufferfish mouth plate in the group shot above but seems to be a broken end of an eagle ray mouth plate (Aetobatus).

#13: More basal section of a stingray tale spine--thicker medial section with thinner sides is characteristic.

#14: Pinfish tooth (Lagodon sp.)--the bifid tooth shape is diagnostic.

#16: Gastropod steinkern (internal shell mold)

#17: Fish spine (possibly modern)

#18: Interesting calcitic marine fossil--possibly echinoid spine (open to be educated on this one). :)

#19: More gastropod steinkerns

#20: Looks to be a bone fragment--likely unidentifiable unless someone has seen one of these before. @old bones

#21: Modern freshwater gastropod (snail)

 

I'll let someone else tackle the shark teeth.

I agree with all of this.

 

1 hour ago, caldigger said:

I would think his crystal mine has been under snow for quite some time. :rolleyes:

Yeah, the snow level has been fluctuating over the mine's elevation. Gets snow, melts, gets more snow. (Right now it has at least 3 inches covering it.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hokietech96

Great pictures. Really amazing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
19 hours ago, hokietech96 said:

Great pictures. Really amazing!

Thank you just taken with a phone and a cheep clip on lens. I really enjoy the photography part of collecting. 

890E7717-47CA-4D25-BB51-2FF51C92FA51.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old bones

Hmmm, I'm stumped on the 'possible bone;.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit
1 hour ago, old bones said:

Hmmm, I'm stumped on the 'possible bone;.

You've spent more time with Florida micro-matrix than anyone else I know so I think we'll consider that item not likely to be identified (by anyone here) anytime soon. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye
On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 2:44 PM, digit said:

I'm rubbish on the smaller shark teeth and other than very distinctive ones like tiger shark, sand tiger, or nurse shark--I'm little use in giving proper identifications

 

 @digit I am disappointed to hear this!!!! My large quantity of Cookie Cutter Creek matrix has been cleaned of all (most if I am truthful) fossils except for a few cups left to examine. I was going to ask you for IDs on my finds when I finish and attempt to photograph these tiny specimens. Should I refer on to Richard Hulbert instead and hope he finally responds to one of my requests??

 

 @Bobby Rico, NICE finds! Isn't micro matrix fun!!! My cookie cutter matrix is the first I have dealt with and hopefully won't be my last. The best part of this type of fossil hunting is that I can display my wonderful finds in the living room and not be scolded for all the clutter I create since she cant see them without her glasses!!!!!! I then use the sandy gravel to put on top of the icey driveway so that she doesn't slip. A win-win for our relationship.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit
1 hour ago, minnbuckeye said:

 @digit I am disappointed to hear this!!!! My large quantity of Cookie Cutter Creek matrix has been cleaned of all (most if I am truthful) fossils except for a few cups left to examine. I was going to ask you for IDs on my finds when I finish and attempt to photograph these tiny specimens. Should I refer on to Richard Hulbert instead and hope he finally responds to one of my requests??

No. Richard doesn't particularly specialize in shark teeth as he's more of a mammal guy (no pun intended). He's had to learn a bit more about shark teeth and micro-fossils from the matrix that is being collected at the Montbrook site but this is far from his bailiwick. There are several folks here who are pretty good with shark teeth and I think we can get those IDs answered here on the forum. Other than some distinctive shark and ray teeth my mind goes to mush (it's a short trip) when I look at "normal" shark teeth and try to assign IDs. Just when I think I know what I'm doing I confuse one species for another with the variation that these teeth can exhibit in different tooth positions. For Isistius triangulus (Cookiecutter Shark) teeth, I'm your man--beyond that, I claim ignorance. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
20 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

 

 @digit I am disappointed to hear this!!!! My large quantity of Cookie Cutter Creek matrix has been cleaned of all (most if I am truthful) fossils except for a few cups left to examine. I was going to ask you for IDs on my finds when I finish and attempt to photograph these tiny specimens. Should I refer on to Richard Hulbert instead and hope he finally responds to one of my requests??

 

 @Bobby Rico, NICE finds! Isn't micro matrix fun!!! My cookie cutter matrix is the first I have dealt with and hopefully won't be my last. The best part of this type of fossil hunting is that I can display my wonderful finds in the living room and not be scolded for all the clutter I create since she cant see them without her glasses!!!!!! I then use the sandy gravel to put on top of the icey driveway so that she doesn't slip. A win-win for our relationship.

 

Mike

Thanks Mike 

Micro Matrix is really addictive and Mrs R loves it too. I would hope I can get some more a some point. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico

Thanks everyone for you kind comments and big thanks to Ken @digit  for all the IDs.

 A couple more and My favourite tooth it is about 3mm only but a real stunner. 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×