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Diverboone

Fish in the Rock

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Diverboone

 I found this fish a few years ago in Stewart County Tn on the Tennessee River bank. 

B51A340B-BFCB-4460-8E48-0FA2814E960B.jpeg

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Pterygotus

Hello and welcome to the forum. Sorry but it doesn’t remind me of a fish. Some more pictures might help :).

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Rockwood

I think the "fish" is a tabulate coral. The plate it is on is likely heavily salted with crinoid material in a smashed form. 

I have encountered the idea that if something lived in water it was a fish. Maybe ? :)

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Diverboone

I’ll have to locate the correct SD card, I have better quality pictures than this. When viewed in real life it’s without a doubt a fish. I wish I could have brought it home, but the limestone rock/boulder that it’s in, would weigh a ton or more. 

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Diverboone

I respect your opinion but I must disagree. There’s a dorsal fin and tail fin that are not very clear in this picture. But the lateral lines can clearly be seen in this picture. 

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Randyw

I agree with the others. Not a fish...

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Rockwood
4 hours ago, Diverboone said:

There’s a dorsal fin and tail fin that are not very clear in this picture. But the lateral lines can clearly be seen in this picture. 

The fins of fossil fish like those from the Green River formation are made up of tiny elements similar in appearance to this. They are in a very thin layer that is difficult to preserve when removing matrix however. This shape, as far as I can see, is composed exclusively of multiple layers of tiny elements. 

A lateral line would perhaps be evidenced in a pattern of scales. Again it would not appear to be a layer that thin that is seen in this photo. 

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Fossildude19
5 hours ago, Diverboone said:

I respect your opinion but I must disagree. There’s a dorsal fin and tail fin that are not very clear in this picture. But the lateral lines can clearly be seen in this picture. 

Well, we can agree to disagree.  :shrug:

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Nautiloid

I agree with the others. This is a coral or bryozoan. 

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GeschWhat

+1 for coral/bryozoan.

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Rockwood
19 hours ago, Diverboone said:

the limestone rock/boulder that it’s in, would weigh a ton or more. 

I'm not real sure, but wouldn't that make this an extremely dense rock, or a very large bryozoan ?

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Randyw

Looking at his wrist and part of glove in lower left corner The bryozoan is about 4-8”

(estimate there’s not a lot of wrist showing to be very accurate) wich would make the rock the size of a bushel basket or washtub so I’m thinking he’s not serious about the ton.....

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Diverboone

Rock is about 5’ wide 4’ y’all and 3.5’ deep. It’s much larger than a bushel basket. Fossil is in the neighborhood of 14” long. I’m positive the rock would weigh no less than 1500lbs but believe it would be much closer to a ton. 

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Rockwood
58 minutes ago, Diverboone said:

Fossil is in the neighborhood of 14” long.

I think that puts it well over the size limit for bryozoan zooids. It almost has to be a tabulate.

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Rockwood
1 hour ago, Diverboone said:

I’m positive the rock would weigh no less than 1500lbs but believe it would be much closer to a ton. 

If I saw a loader headed for my pickup truck with it I would definitely be concerned.

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Mark Kmiecik

Limestone sized 5' x 4' x 3.5' weighs in at more than 8,000 pounds, assuming 120 pounds per cubic foot, which is a conservative estimate per cubic foot.

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jpc

I agree to agree with the bryozoan crowd.

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Rockwood
19 hours ago, Diverboone said:

Fossil is in the neighborhood of 14” long.

How does that math work on a zooid ?

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Rockwood

With a lean like that you would want to notch bore and trigger cut it to get 'er down safely. ;)

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TqB
1 hour ago, Rockwood said:

With a lean like that you would want to notch bore and trigger cut it to get 'er down safely. ;)

I haven't a clue what that means! :D:headscratch:

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