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PetrolPete

Id Needed For Some Oklahoma Concretion Fossils

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Missourian

Another interesting one:

attachicon.gifIMG_1337.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_1338.JPG

Any ideas?

Looks like a sailboat. :)

Otherwise, wow! I'd guess it has something to do with a fish fin.

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PetrolPete

Looks like a sailboat. :)

Otherwise, wow! I'd guess it has something to do with a fish fin.

the weird part is how the lower part is smooth, but the upper part has striations running up to the tip

....which kinda makes it look more like a sailboat

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PetrolPete

another interesting one, it kinda looks like an elongate petrodus of some sort. It's hard to see, but there are ridges running along the wall. Any Ideas?

post-8113-0-83991700-1367903601_thumb.jpg

post-8113-0-90507700-1367903606_thumb.jpg

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PetrolPete

Missourian, those are some interesting spines. As for the big one my daughter is holding, I "found" it, but not in the field. It is the same one that was written up by Zidek in the paper I cited earlier. In that paper, it was said to be in a private collection. I was familiar with the paper when I happened to see it, and other Pennsylvanian vertebrate fossils, for sale by a fossil dealer. it turned out that he had gotten them from the widow of the collector. I bought the whole collection and donated it all to the American Museum of Natural History in New York after taking photos. This was about 15 years ago. The curator, John Maisey, gave me casts of the more interesting specimens, like the big Physonemus. The photo is the actual specimen.

PetrolPete, if the spine is completely nodeless, they could be worn off or it might be something else like Stethacanthus.

I've been trying to find a Stenthacanthus picture to compare it to, but I haven't had much luck. Any idea where to look?

Thanks again

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PetrolPete

Here are some of the recent finds I posted in the trip page, but I'm putting them here too to see if they can get ID'd. Also note, I had to take these pictures rushed, so I'll try and some better ones later

This one was really interesting because it had symmetry and appeared to be made of tiny plates:

post-8113-0-38593200-1369063682_thumb.jpg

This one was really cool, but I have no idea as to what it could be:

post-8113-0-47433800-1369063690_thumb.jpg

post-8113-0-36100200-1369063692_thumb.jpg

Edited by PetrolPete

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PetrolPete

I'm horrible at IDing cephalopods, so if anyone has any a good idea:

post-8113-0-92901800-1369063787_thumb.jpg

I'll need to add a better picture later but that one 'bone' in the lower right hand corner is interesting, it is V shaped and has a rounded split at one end:

post-8113-0-72860300-1369063790_thumb.jpg

Another one I have no Idea on

post-8113-0-66302900-1369063794_thumb.jpg

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PetrolPete

And a couple more:

this one is kinda bowl shaped with some twisted nacre inside:

post-8113-0-84578000-1369064185_thumb.jpg

And this one is like one I've posted before, but I'm still not sure what it/they is/are

post-8113-0-32026700-1369064188_thumb.jpg

Thanks again for the help

Edited by PetrolPete

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Missourian

This one was really interesting because it had symmetry and appeared to be made of tiny plates:

attachicon.gifIMG_1361.JPG

I think this may be a weathered Lawrenciella.

Compare with these:

post-6808-0-36471600-1369070716_thumb.jpg

post-6808-0-43942300-1369070702_thumb.jpg

The 'plates' could actually be the 'cellular' structure within the cranium bones.

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PetrolPete

you might be right. I can't do a good comparison though because it was found by a friend of mine and she has it. I'll let her know, thanks.

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PetrolPete

Hopefully there pictures are betterattachicon.gifIMG_1256.JPGattachicon.gifIMG_1257.JPG

Could physonemus depressus (or something similar) be a possibility?

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Conostichus

Image 1361 is almost certainly a paleoniscoid fish skull. Mark McKenzie and I (John McLeod) found these in the Missourian Graford Formation in some abundance. We misidentified them in the first version of our book Pennsylvanian Fossils of North Texas as possible shark skulls.  In the revised and expanded version (Color Guide to Pennsylvanian Fossils of North Texas) they were correctly identified with the help of Dr. John Maisey (AMNH).  At the time of publication the fauna was undescribed to Family level

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Conostichus

Some paleoniscoid braincase/skull pix from the Finis (Virgilian) and Graford (Missourian) respectively in North Texas (from CGPFNT)

skull1.jpg

skull2.jpg

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