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taylorcustom

looking for dorudon skull images

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taylorcustom

Hi, I am currently working on an artwork that will involve the skull of Dorudon (I have not decided on a particular species). I have spent many hours scouring the internet for images (including looking through the articles linked to in "Fruitbat's Pdf Library" on this forum).

 

I've found lots of photos of Dorudon skulls, but almost all of them are taken from very similar angles. I am finding frustratingly few images of the posterior face of the skull, and am wondering if someone here can help me, or at least point me in the right direction. For my purposes an image of a Basilosaur might be sufficient.

 

I'm also having trouble finding an image which clearly shows the suture lines on the dorsal surface of the skull.

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

 

 

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doushantuo

SO you 've got all of  the collective output of  Gingerich,Uhen,Thewissen,Snively,Kellogg covered?

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taylorcustom
16 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

SO you 've got all of  the collective output of  Gingerich,Uhen,Thewissen,Snively,Kellogg covered?

 

Thanks for your reply! I haven't looked through every PDF file, but I did look through the articles listed under "Family Basilosauridae" and "Family Dorudontidae". There was a lot to go through, so it is possible I missed something.

 

I really wish that some museum visitor had posted a clear, close-up image of the back of a Dorudon skull, but I guess that isn't a very exciting angle.

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doushantuo

Basioccipital region might be insufficiently preserved.

There might be something on Basilosaurus in Guerin,Slijper,van Beneden,Brandt.

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LordTrilobite

There's a skull sculpture in Teylers museum in Haarlem, Netherlands. It's definitely a primitive whale. I'm not quite sure which species it is though. I have some photos I made back in 2007.

 

I hope this helps. Otherwise I would definitely recommend visiting the museum some time. It's small but rather lovely.

whale1.jpg

whale2.jpg

whale3.jpg

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taylorcustom
13 hours ago, doushantuo said:

Basioccopital region might be insufficiently preserved.

There might be something on Basilosaurus in Guerin,Slijper,van Beneden,Brandt.

Thanks. Unfortunately, an internet search for these authors' names along with "basilosaurus" did not turn up any new images.

One of the PDF articles in the previously mentioned collection has a link to 3d data for finite element analysis... unfortunately, I have not yet found software that can open the file format used (.FEM).

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taylorcustom
7 hours ago, LordTrilobite said:

There's a skull sculpture in Teylers museum in Haarlem, Netherlands. It's definitely a primitive whale. I'm not quite sure which species it is though. I have some photos I made back in 2007.

 

I hope this helps. Otherwise I would definitely recommend visiting the museum some time. It's small but rather lovely.

 

Many thanks! These photos are super helpful because every other museum specimen that I've seen shows the whale's mouth open, so you don't get a good idea of how the teeth interlock.

 

These photos also illustrate my predicament... that nobody ever takes pictures of the back of anything:-(

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Boesse

Here you go - Mark Uhen's 2004 monograph on Dorudon atrox. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48670

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Fruitbat

Well...I feel better...just double-checked my pdf library and I already had a link to that Uhen monograph!  I was afraid that I'd missed something important!  I'll see what else I can find for you taylorcustom.

 

-Joe

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Fruitbat

While I'm looking...you might find some interesting information in this Luo and Gingerich article:  Terrestrial Mesonychia to Aquatic Cetacea: Transformation of the Basicranium and Evolution of Hearing in Whales.  Check around page 38.

 

Joe

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taylorcustom
3 hours ago, Boesse said:

Here you go - Mark Uhen's 2004 monograph on Dorudon atrox. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48670

Thanks! It turns out I had already looked through this article. The line drawings on pages 18-19 are somewhat useful, plus there is an informative photo of the bottom of the occipital region, but I still have to do mental photogrammetry to try to figure out exactly what I am looking at.

 

BTW, I will post my diagram here when it is complete.

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taylorcustom
36 minutes ago, Fruitbat said:

While I'm looking...you might find some interesting information in this Luo and Gingerich article:  Terrestrial Mesonychia to Aquatic Cetacea: Transformation of the Basicranium and Evolution of Hearing in Whales.  Check around page 38.

 

Joe

Thanks for making this great resource available! Aside from the back of the skull, I am also a bit confused about how the teeth interlock. In the photos that LordTrilobite uploaded, it is clear that the upper front set of teath is forward and medial to the lower set of front teeth.... however in almost every other photo and image, it appears to be the other way around. Is it possible that this is just a result of an error in fossil reconstruction? Could this be a result of variation between species?

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Fruitbat

Now THAT question is best addressed by @Boesse.  He's the expert on Cetaceans!

 

-Joe

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Fruitbat

While poring through some new resources, I stumbled across this one which does show a view of the back of a Zygorhiza (Dorudontinae) skull (not a great view...but it's something) from Mississippi.

 

LINK TO ARTICLE

 

-Joe

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