cyruspup

Everyone calls this Tule Root Fossil Yet No One Knows What It really Is?

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I hope someone in this world has seen this rock before and can tell me what it is. Found in Mohave Valley, AZ near Golden Shores. Rock club members call it Tule Root Fossil?

 

Rocks are 1-3 inches in size and light in weight. It is hard to find.

 

I cannot find any pictures of it anywhere online?

 

Help

P5190119.JPG

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I think all three pieces are the same (although one is polished to show internal structure).

I also think that they are a rhyolitic volcanic rock (some types are called "wonder stone".) They look like they came from a secondary deposit, ie river gravels or.....

Not tule roots as Tim said.

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Funnily enough,I think both of you are right.

Liesegang patterns occur in rhyolitic rocks

Rhyolitic rocks are silicic,of course(definitionwise),and silica gels lend themselves to geochemical and mechanical self-organization(e.g. Merino,1987)

 

liesaestick.jpg

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tule :

 

tule-tree-burl.jpg

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4 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

tule :

 

tule-tree-burl.jpg

No- not tule.

 

This is tule...

Schoenoplectus acutus
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Schoenoplectus acutus
Schoenoplectus acutus var occidentalis BB-1913.png
Schoenoplectus acutus var. occidentalis
Scientific classification
Kingdom:    Plantae
(unranked):    Angiosperms
(unranked):    Monocots
(unranked):    Commelinids
Order:    Poales
Family:    Cyperaceae
Genus:    Schoenoplectus
Species:    S. acutus
Binomial name
Schoenoplectus acutus
(Muhl. ex J.M.Bigelow) Á.Löve & D.Löve
Schoenoplectus acutus (syn. Scirpus acutus, Schoenoplectus lacustris, Scirpus lacustris subsp. acutus), called tule /ˈtuːliː/, common tule, hardstem tule, tule rush, hardstem bulrush, or viscid bulrush, is a giant species of sedge in the plant family Cyperaceae, native to freshwater marshes all over North America.[1] The common name derives from the Nāhuatl word tōllin [ˈtoːlːin], and was first applied by the early settlers from New Spain who recognized the marsh plants in the Central Valley of California as similar to those in the marshes around Mexico City.
Tules once lined the shores of Tulare Lake, California, formerly the largest freshwater lake in the western United States, until it was drained by land speculators in the 20th century. The expression "out in the tules" is still common, deriving from the dialect of old Californian families and means "where no one would want to live", with a touch of irony. The phrase is comparable to "out in the boondocks".[2]
It has a thick, rounded green stem growing to 1 to 3 m (3 to 10 ft) tall, with long, grasslike leaves, and radially symmetrical, clustered, pale brownish flowers. Tules at shorelines play an important ecological role, helping to buffer against wind and water forces, thereby allowing the establishment of other types of plants and reducing erosion. Tules are sometimes cleared from waterways using herbicides. When erosion occurs, tule rhizomes are replanted in strategic areas.

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hardstem bulrush

edit:

 

??????

This was not (exactly)what i posted??

"El tule",again

 

Possibly the tree with the largest girth in the world

 

 

mitlatree_medium.jpg

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I don't believe it to be a fossil either, although it bears a little resemblance to a stromatolite.

heres an example:

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11 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

I don't believe it to be a fossil either, although it bears a little resemblance to a stromatolite.

heres an example:

 

Where?! :wacko:

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@JohnBrewer I thought the large darker one looked a little like one, but I am not the greatest at fossil identification. I still think it's probably not a fossil, especially given the location.

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1 hour ago, ynot said:

I think all three pieces are the same (although one is polished to show internal structure).

I also think that they are a rhyolitic volcanic rock (some types are called "wonder stone".) They look like they came from a secondary deposit, ie river gravels or.....

Not tule roots as Tim said.

The look comes from it's being deposited in air just shy of molten I think.

Like a super hot shower :)

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Were you intending to post an example image?

 

yeah, know what you mean with fossil id, I'm in the same boat but with uk marine reptiles I'm getting there. :) 

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