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haastone

Okay, I found this tooth in Wisconsin.  It was on the shore of an island that was land 90 years ago.  Can anyone tell me if this is a shark tooth.  The closest I can tell is its a mako, but all history books say that would be impossible.  Maybe its reptile or some kind of gar, or maybe a even a mammal...

 

Here is a video link.....and yes I'm a painter on break, hence the dirty hands lol.

 

 

20190208_230337.jpg

20190208_230324.jpg

20190208_230257.jpg

Edited by haastone

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Rockwood

Those hard working hands, I'm sorry to say, are holding a suggestively shaped rock. A slight difference in resistance to wear from one end to the other is often the main causal element in such shapes.

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Raggedy Man

Its just a suggestive rock. Shark teeth are exceedingly rare in Wisconsin and are only found at a few sites. If they were more abundant, I would definitely be hunting them. 

 

Best regards,

Paul

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haastone

Okay I thought it was a rock at first as well.  My digital microscope is reading 2 different types of rock if that's the case.  Is it possible this rock formation has eroded just right from sand stone type fossil/rock (gums) to almost granite/volcanic type fossil/rock.  Plus I had a rock guy from Wheaton University say he is almost certain it is in fact a fossil?  

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ynot
11 minutes ago, haastone said:

My digital microscope is reading 2 different types of rock i

How does Your digital microscope determine rock?

 

11 minutes ago, haastone said:

Is it possible this rock formation has eroded just right from sand stone type fossil/rock (gums) to almost granite/volcanic type fossil/rock. 

No, it does not work that way.

 

11 minutes ago, haastone said:

rock guy from Wheaton University say he is almost certain it is in fact a fossil?  

Need to find another rock guy because there is no chance that this is a fossil.

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haastone

Do you think this is typical rock from little south of Hayward?

 

 

 

S20190101_0006.jpg.36847fe847e13934da888737fb68dbe7.jpgS20190101_0005.jpg.cb1fec9ed52956e680279242e408a855.jpgS20190101_0004.jpg.5922f014171079c13358ddc3f8996068.jpgS20190101_0003.jpg.07b74f56cfddf80befe117e948c98c84.jpgS20190101_0002.jpg.1b3b45d45b6704b86977928f83b583e9.jpgS20190101_0007.jpg.312830f42993cf717d4a1d572f5f8be9.jpg

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TyBoy

Closeup photos say rock not fossil

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Rockwood
1 hour ago, haastone said:

do you think this is typical rock from little south of Hayward

Do you know how many cubic miles of ice have passed through Hayward since the rock was deposited as sediment ?

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haastone

i do not?  But if its a rock then its a rock.

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Rockwood
7 hours ago, haastone said:

i do not?  But if its a rock then its a rock.

During the summer hardly a day goes by that I don't take a minute to scan glacially deposited material for a small fossil. This shape is very familiar to me.

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haastone

Lets say this is a fossil, from the glacier melt, would it be worth anything?

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Tidgy's Dad

Tis a rock.

But if it were a fossil it would be worth something to someone, I suppose.

But we are unable to give appraisals on the forum anyway. 

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Rockwood
2 minutes ago, haastone said:

Lets say this is a fossil, from the glacier melt, would it be worth anything?

It's not what I'm arguing. I offered it as an explanation  for it not looking like "typical rock" in a more general sense.

If it were to be proven to be a fossil it would definitely have scientific value.

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haastone

Well thank you all for your input, I appreciate the help in trying to figure out this little guy.  It is fascinating none the less.  

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haastone

Here's the so called rock under a little different lighting...

20190211_115519 (2).jpg

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Rockwood

Shape alone is rarely a good indicator, and the texture (small angular indentations) is not typical of fossils. It is quite typical of rocks that have been fractured along cleavage  planes in the minerals that make up the rocks. Weathering and abrasion have smoothed it some but not enough to completely eliminate sings of the larger mineral crystals.

That being said, I do hope someone comes up with counterpoints to the argument. 

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haastone

The shape to everyone at my bar thinks it's a shark tooth possibly some prehistoric gar or better a back of the mouth saber tooth.  Cheers!

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DPS Ammonite
On 2/10/2019 at 7:54 AM, haastone said:

Do you think this is typical rock from little south of Hayward?

S20190101_0006.jpg.36847fe847e13934da888737fb68dbe7.jpgS20190101_0005.jpg.cb1fec9ed52956e680279242e408a855.jpgS20190101_0004.jpg.5922f014171079c13358ddc3f8996068.jpgS20190101_0003.jpg.07b74f56cfddf80befe117e948c98c84.jpgS20190101_0002.jpg.1b3b45d45b6704b86977928f83b583e9.jpg

It looks like a very fine grained volcanic rock with small, euhedral, light-colored, elongated crystals that are likely feldspar. The indentations are where the crystals eroded away.

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Zenmaster6
3 hours ago, haastone said:

The shape to everyone at my bar thinks it's a shark tooth possibly some prehistoric gar or better a back of the mouth saber tooth.  Cheers!

The untrained eye (and even the trained eye) can be easily fooled by shapes and colors. I agree 100% this is indeed a mineral. There is no enamel or striations that would indicate a tooth. Nor is the basal of the tooth the right texture or color. I've sifted through MANY rock like fossils before I was able to find the real thing and even to this day I make the same mistake. If I found it on the beach, I'd probably put it back down. IF HOWEVER it was indeed a mako tooth it would not be a fortune. (below 80$) Here is a picture of a real mako tooth. You can see the lines along the tooth and the shine it produces. Also the root is microscopically porous. I wish you luck on your future finds   - John 

20100707%20077.jpg

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Rockwood
50 minutes ago, DPS Ammonite said:

It looks like a very fine grained volcanic rock with small, euhedral, light-colored, elongated crystals that are likely feldspar. The indentations are where the crystals eroded away.

Perhaps, but sandstone in beach gravel takes on a similar appearance. The differing textures and the shape I believe would tend to pull things that way.

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DPS Ammonite

It is very rare to find euhedral crystals in beach sand. The one exception might be zircon which is harder than quartz. Euhedral crystals are common in volcanic rocks.

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Rockwood

Of course you realize now I have to try to find them in a fossil. :)

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Zenmaster6
9 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Of course you realize now I have to try to find them in a fossil. :)

There is actually a video of a guy on youtube names Ze Jurrasico (from Portugal) and he found a quartz shard inside a scallop fossil.

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Rockwood
10 hours ago, DPS Ammonite said:

It is very rare to find euhedral crystals in beach sand. The one exception might be zircon which is harder than quartz. Euhedral crystals are common in volcanic rocks.

Would pyrite count ? I keep forgetting to account for the fact that the rocks in my area are all metamorphosed. Could you be making the same era in the case of this post ?

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Rockwood
33 minutes ago, Zenmaster6 said:

There is actually a video of a guy on youtube names Ze Jurrasico (from Portugal) and he found a quartz shard inside a scallop fossil.

Couldn't find it right off. Probably a snarge the sand grain full growth ahead kind of thing ?

snarge:  The remains of a bird after it has collided with an airplane (bird strike), especially a turbine engine. Where did that come from ?

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