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Found 17 results

  1. Fast. Intelligent. Deadly. The "Raptor" is perhaps one of the most famous dinosaur today thanks to Jurassic Park. To many people's surprise however, raptors are heavily feathered and nimbler than movies would have you believe. The Jurassic Park Velociraptor was merely the size of coyote in real life! In fact, their proper family name is 'Dromaeosaurid'. The largest species was Utahraptor, and it grew to the size of a grizzly bear! Dromaeosaurid fossils have been found all over the world. They first appeared during the Cretaceous, though isolated teeth have been found in the mid-Jurassic. Allow
  2. Hi TFF, I am a Dromaeosauridae enthusiast and have been collecting online for a little while now. I want to thank the members here for getting me educated on so many aspects of fossil teeth identification. I want to share my small collection in the hopes this is helpful for some of you in the future. Your critical input is highly appreciated, as always! #1 First up, one of my treasures, a robust Deinonychus antirrhopus tooth from the Cloverly Fm. A big thanks to @StevenJD for letting go of this one – much appreciated! Note the asymmetry in the placement of the carinae
  3. PetrosTrilobite

    Acheroraptor teeth

    It is easy to find Acheroraptor teeth in fossil e-shop?
  4. My Hell Creek Microraptorine sickle claw that I traded for a larger Hell Creek Dromaeosaur sickle claw. Probably Acheroraptor. The Microraptorine sickle claw after full restoration. It is related to Hesperonychus. I will miss it:
  5. I bought a killing claw from one of my favorite sellers with the hope that some work could be done to it to bring it back to life, per say. Hxmendoza did that and more. His work is phenomenal! Thanks, Henry! The light tip was sun-bleached because it was a surface find. The proximal half of the claw was found in the ground below it. Henry used a process to rejuvenate it, and no paint was used. Overall, the claw is well over 90% original. Heres some comparison photos:
  6. Dracarys

    Acheroraptor vs Small Nano

    Hi All, Below are 4 teeth w the small (A) tooth being a Acheroraptor w the characteristic changes in size between anterior and posterior carinae serrations and ridges in the crown. I then obtained 3 more teeth (B-D) that are larger (around 13 mms). These teeth do seem to have the serrations size difference in the carinae but only tooth (D) has the ridges and is more flattened while teeth (B) and (C) have no ridges and more thickened. Does the serrations size changes between carinae trump no ridges? And does the thickened size of the two teeth suggests that they are small nano teeth
  7. PointyKnight

    Troodontid or Dromaeosaurid teeth?

    Hey everyone, I came across these teeth online; They're being sold as an Acheroraptor teeth, but seemed odd to me and reminded me of some recurved Pectinodon teeth I had seen elsewhere (given their small size, too). [Tooth 1] The tooth was found in Hell Creek deposits in Carter County, Montana. I edited the seller's images together to make some features more visible. Its total height is 5mm; the serration density I measured is around 6/mm; Scale bar is 4mm. [Tooth 2] The tooth was found in Hell Creek deposits in Powder River County, Montana. Its total height
  8. Hey everyone! In this post im going to be sharing two teeth from my collection. The first one was sold to me as acheroraptor. Its from the Hell Creek formation in MT and its CH is 7 mm. @Troodon
  9. I have been working hard lately on all of our programs and we are very close to having the dinosaur presentation I want us to have. We have a name for this program, Dinos Rock. Yes it is not super creative but for 2nd graders, this is a geology themed program. For 3rd graders, it is adaptation based but the name works. We have added some pieces that gives us more than a few teeth. Nothing museum quality or anything but a few bones help the visual factor. I have been studying the biology, geology and ecology of dinosaurs so the science will be good. my son is working on the art but we wont have
  10. fossilsonwheels

    Hell Creek Theropod Tooth- Acheroraptor?

    This is a .35" theropod tooth from the Hell Creek formation, Carter County Montana. It is a really pretty little tooth for sure and it would look great in our Acheroraptor display. I believe I see the ridges that are diagnostic to that species, especially in the first picture. I wanted to run this by the forum to be sure I am seeing what I need to see though.
  11. I thought I’d post some of my favorite claws from my collection. I’m curious what people think about my ID on one of them and I have no idea what the last one is. ID help with that one would be great! (All measurements are straight line) Spinosaurus hand claw 4 1/2” Kem Kem Beds, Morocco Repairs, but I see no restoration Acheroraptor Temerytorum foot walking claw 1 7/8” Hell Creek Carter County, Montana No repair or restoration (at first). However, the tip broke off during molding and it was lost. 1/16” restoration do
  12. I recently added a Dromaeosaurid vertebra to our collection. I honestly did not bother with specs once I got it confirmed as Dromaeosaurid. I never asked size or what formation. I assumed it was from Judith River because it was sold as Dromaeosaurus. i knew it was going to be Dromaeosaurid indet so I was not worried about the specific ID. It is a raptor fossil so I wanted it. The vertebra arrived today and I got two very pleasant surprises. It is bigger than I thought. It is also not from Judith River or the species known from that formation. We got a Dromaeosaurid vertebra from th
  13. fossilsonwheels

    Acheroratpor tooth confirmation

    Based on the numerous and informative posts of @Troodon, I feel pretty confident that this tooth is an Acheroraptor. It is from the Hell Creek formation, South Dakota. I saw some things that looked diagnostic and the seller provided pics that were pretty good. Anybody want to confirm the ID or present an alternative ?
  14. The seller put these teeth up for sale and identifies them as unidentified Dromaeosaurus teeth with possibly one being Acheroraptor. Looking for consensus on the identification, thank you for looking
  15. David Evans who described Acheroraptor shared this photo and information on a few notable Dromaeosaurid's. Thought it would be of interest to the Dino guys and others. I also show a hand next to an adult Velociraptor skull which gives a real life size comparison, since a lot of depictions and replicas sold are well oversized. Acherorapter is from the Maastrichtian of Hell Creek/Lance Formation Saurornitholestes shown from Campanian of Canada/Montana Velociraptor from Campanian of Asia David: How big was the Hell Creek dromaeosaurid Acheroraptor temertyorum
  16. I just got my large Acheroraptor temertyorum digit II-3 killing claw back from the restorer. He added the missing 1/4” back on to the top of the articulating end and added the missing 3/4” of the tip. The rest of the claw is complete, as it was found nearly whole. It’s one of my prized possessions and I am so happy with the restoration work. The claw was found in Powder River County, Montana’s Hell Creek Formation.
  17. This is a fossil from the Cretaceous time period, it was found in the Hell creek formation. The specimen is a little under an inch long (tried to get a good picture of the serrations). I've done some research on the differences between the species I listed in the title and I've come short of being able to properly identify it (I'm only really a rookie fossil collector).
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