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  1. I've heard many times that the Ankylosaurus tail club is capable of breaking bones, and it certainly looks capable of doing so. However, is there any estimate in numbers that represents the force this weapon could exert?
  2. Today is my last day off before I go back to work and I was supposed to spend the day making fossil starter kits. I have a cold though and I do not want the kids to think that 12 million year old shark teeth gave them a cold lol I am pretty bored so I thought I would post about our Judith River dinosaur fossils and how we are going to get discuss this formation. I am really surprised how much I am enjoying learning about these dinosaurs and this will be a formation that we spend a good bit of time on. It must have had some very productive ecosystems and there is a great diversity here to discuss. The kids will also get to see some familiar dinosaur families while learning about species that are new to them. I think during adaptation related presentations, this formation lets us get into ecological niches and discuss how two Tyrannosaurids existed as did at least two species of Dromaeosaurids and a Troodonitd plus other predators including non dinos. That is a lot of hungry mouths so niche selection and adaptations become very important. THere is also a great diversity of herbivores in this formation. I love the Ceratopsians from this formation and the diversity gives my son a lot of artistic options. We currently have one tooth but by the time we present we will have a couple more I think. This allows us to present a few species and say the teeth are not diagnostic so the teeth could have belonged to one or more really cool looking horned dinosaurs. This also gives the kids knowledge that there other Ceratopsians besides Triceratops. This will also be the point where we introduce Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are just iconic and this formation gives us the chance to really hit on adaptations. We have a Saurornitholestes tooth and will soon have a Dormaeosaurid caudal vertebra. While not assigned specifically to Dromaeosaurus, the vert will presented that way so we can talk about the differences between the two raptors. Of particular interest is the larger skull, more robust teeth, and specific wear patterns on the teeth of Dromaeosaurus. We will also have a small tooth tip from a Tyrannosaur indet. The kids will love learning about other Tyrannosaurids and I will leave it to the kids to imagine which one it belonged to. The real owner of the tooth is not important. That two existed in this formation is what is important. They must have occupied different niches plus a lot of kids may think T-Rex was the only member of that family. The last fossil I know we will have from Judith River is one of my favorites. It is an Ankylosaurus tooth and thanks to some help from TFF members, I spotted this among a few Nodosaur teeth. In our inventory, this is Ankylosaurus indet. However, in every single dinosaur presentation we do this will be Zuul and it will be a rock star. We want the kids to understand that there are many new discoveries being made and there will be a lot of new dinosaur discoveries made by THEIR generation. Everything about Zuul will be cool to kids. It is the one of the most incredible fossils ever found, armored dinosaurs are just cool, and it even has a pop culture name that a lot of kids will recognize from Ghostbusters lol Only 5 fossils but we can do A LOT of quality education with these fossils. I also have a very clear idea of the next items to find from Judith River. #1 on that list is a Dromaeosaurus tooth. A tooth gives us the perfect way of illustrating the difference between the raptors. We have two more purchases to complete before I buy again so I will save up and in the spring I start searching for that tooth. I also would love to add a hadrosaur bone from this formation and eventually I will track down a frill piece. Anyway, here a couple of the fossils... Pic 1- our Saurornitholestes tooth. Not a great picture but a really nice tooth. Pic 2- the Dormaeosaurid indet vert. Not here yet but will be right around my B-day. Pic 3- the Anky tooth. It is just a cool tooth and Zuul is a great dinosaur to teach kids about so Zuul is what this tooth is for Fossils on Wheels. Our only fossil from an armored dinosaur.
  3. dongmin

    ankylosaurus fossil

    This fossil is called an Ankylosaurus scoot scute armor plate discovered in the Hell Creek Formation. I don't know which part of Ankylosaurus this fossil refers to, but I would appreciate it if you could tell me which part of Ankylosaurus it refers to! I'm sorry I posted it wrong before so I'm uploading it again.
  4. dongmin

    Ankylosaurus fossil

    This is an Ankylosaurus fossil discovered in the Hell Creek Formation. What part is it from? Are these fossils very rare? Is it difficult to find? How much does an Ankylosaurus tail club fossil cost? Is what you see on the surface skin? Or something?
  5. FF7_Yuffie

    Ankylosaur scute -- Wealden

    Hello, I am quite interested in this scute from Wealden. I would like to check if it is as described and is a dinosaur scute. Thank -- it is from Wealden Clay Formation
  6. ThePhysicist

    Ankylosaurus tooth

    Identification Teeth of Nodosaurids are often confused for those of their rarer relatives, the Ankylosaurids, namely the archetypical Ankylosaurian, Ankylosaurus. (Most) teeth of Ankylosaurus are taller than they are wide, are generally conical in shape with one side flatter than the other, have large denticles on the anterior and posterior edges (6-8 anterior, 5-7 posterior), and have swollen/bulbous bases. Tooth wear is normally on the crown face, compared to wear on the tip (apex) as in Nodosaurids.1,2 Comments This tooth is partially rooted; the root is cylindrical and hollow. There is a wear facet on one side, offset from the center, with grooves roughly perpendicular to the apicobasal axis (suggestive of the mastication motion). This tooth was found in the same county as the holotype of this species. References 1. Carpenter, K. "Redescription of Ankylosaurus magniventris Brown 1908 (Ankylosauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous of the Western Interior of North America." Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (2004), 41(8): 961-986. https://doi.org/10.1139/e04-043 2. Carpenter, K. "Baby dinosaurs from the Lance and Hell Creek formations and a description of a new theropod." Contributions to Geology (1982), 20: 123–134.
  7. svcgoat

    New Display Stand

    Here is the display my father-in-law welded for my Ankylosaurus Femur. Excuse the mess I have a cabinet coming soon for my smaller items
  8. Dino Dad 81

    Ankylosaurs osteoderm

    Hi all, I'm looking to confirm whether this specimen from the Hell Creek--Powder River county, Montana--is from an Ankylosaurus. I'm also wondering if its position can be determined, since it has such an unusual shape. Does the hollow proximal side suggest it was part of the tail? Thanks,
  9. ThePhysicist

    Ankylosaurus tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    One of my favorites as a kid - the archetypical Ankylosaurian - Ankylosaurus. Ankylosaurus teeth appear to be fairly uncommon in Hell Creek - some paleontologists have suggested that Ankylosaurus may have lived in the highlands or nearer the coast of Laramidia. Most "Ankylosaurus" teeth you see for sale are actually Nodosaurid (cf. Denversaurus), for whatever reason, they seem to be far more common. Ankylosaurus teeth also often have wear facets, as this one does. The denticles give their teeth a "leaf-like" appearance. Given their shorter stature, Ankylosaurians probably were low-browsers. This one was found by a rancher last year, and was rediscovered and prepped out of the matrix in October.
  10. ThePhysicist

    Ankylosaurus tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A rare tooth from the Hell Creek formation. Curiously most Ankylosaurian teeth you see online are actually Nodosaurid. This one is the Ankylosaurus.
  11. ThePhysicist

    Ankylosaurus tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    The denticles and enamel of this Ankylosaurus tooth are exceedingly well-preserved.
  12. Per Christian

    Ankylosaurus skull piece and scute?

    I ended up buying this piece, and probably should have posted it here before i did that.. but here are two fossils listed as Ankylosaurus skull piece and scute. Can anyone here give their opinion on it? I don't have county, but it's from the hell creek formation, south Dakota. The largest piece is 10 cm long. @Troodon
  13. WillEvans6097

    Ankylosaurus Tooth?

    Hello fellow fossil fans! I've recently purchased this tooth online and I'm struggling to determine whether it is actually an Ankylosaurus tooth (as advertised) or whether it is a Nodosaur tooth instead. The description is as follows: "0.5" ANKYLOSAURUS FOSSIL TOOTH LANCE CREEK FM CRETACEOUS DINOSAUR WY COA & DISPLAY Location: Lance Creek Formation, Wyoming (Private Land Origin) Weight: 0.2 Ounces Dimensions: 0.5 Inches Long 0.4 Inches Wide, 0.2 Inches Thick" I would really appreciate anyones help to figure this out!
  14. Piks

    Ankylosaur ungual?

    A nodosaur/Ankylosaur ? Ungual from my collection . A dis-articulated Surface find from central USA in “Appalachia”
  15. Hi all, with Covid making it impossible to attend any shows here last year I was able to visit the Munich Show last weekend. Among others I’ve bought this tooth. Ive learned from you guys not to trust the ID done by the seller so after reading some posts here I doubt that the tooth is a ankylosaurus magniventris. To me it looks more like a Thescelosaurus. Am I correct with this opinion? Details provided by the seller: Hell Creek Formation North West South Dakota Thanks in advance for your expertise!
  16. Pixpaleosky

    Cretaceous scute to identify

    Help needed ! I prepped part of this bone with the highest difficulties because of a thin crust of iron sticking to the fossil. It comes from continental cretaceous of South of France. Before going further I would like to identify it to assess if it is worth the trouble . I hesitate between a Nodosauridae scute and simply a... turtle scute. I took pictures of the top (under the thin remaining matrix it is all bone), sides and bottom (which is totally unprepped and may never be, just note it is flat)
  17. dingo2

    Is this an Ankylosaurus scute?

    Looking for an ID on this scute. Found in the Dinosaur Park formation. Length is 3 inches.
  18. I found a bunch of these teeth on the Judith River Formation yesterday and not sure of the identification. Based on google searches they appear to be (from left to right) triceratops, ankylosaurus, and Hadrosaur. The one on the left is about 3/4" as a reference. Any direction would be greatly appreciated.
  19. gturner333

    ankylosaurus tooth?

    I found this in some Lance formation matrix. Might it be an ankylosaurus tooth? If not, what do you think it may be? Thanks for any help. The hash marks are 1mm.
  20. Hi there Amateur Dinobot again, with the self isolation, I had some time to look back at a couple of my purchases. They were bought a couple years ago on a popular auction site. The sellers did not have a lot of reviews so it felt like a bit of a gamble. The first on I was told was a deltadromeus partial jaw and was found in Norther Africa in 2015. The other I was told was an Ankylosaurus scute. I dont recall if the seller provided any further detail but he is no longer selling items. Thanks for the input! Wasnt sure if they were identified correctly or not deltadromeus deltadrom
  21. hadrosauridae

    Last year's Hell Creek finds

    Here are some of the better finds from my digging trip in South Dakota last year. First up is what is likely an osteoderm from Ankylosaurus. This specimen is gone for research. I've got a "stupid rookie" story to go along with this if anyone is interested. Next is a section of Edmontosaurus rib with the head and part of the main. This still needs final cleaning and consolidation. I'm still debating whether to leave them separate or re-create the missing portion and join them. This is the largest and most complete ossified Edmontosaurus tail tendon I have seen. Most of the time you only find little 1 inch sections. This one is completed prep, retaining some of the matrix and a random BOB, as dug. Nice chunk of turtle shell. I have a love/hate relationship with these. This is one is large and quite thick. Most of them are extremely thin and fragile as egg shell. Still needs final prep and consolidation. Unfortunately its a covered in CA, which is making it so much harder. A very nice Tricerotops tooth that my son recovered. He is like a magnet for these large trike teeth. This is the 3rd big one he's found. All I find are tiny spitters. This is a juvenile T-Rex tooth, found beside the Ed rib. This one is gone for research. There's also a small nano-T tooth missing its tip, and a large BOB which I think could be a bit of Trike frill. No pics of those available at this moment. I'll have to add them later.
  22. gturner333

    Aguja tooth or what

    I found this in some matrix I brought back from the Aguja formation in Brewster county, Texas. I makes me think of a tooth, a little like an ankylosaurus tooth. Any thoughts? The hash marks are 1mm. Thanks for any help.
  23. WERTY

    ankylosaurus club?

    Location location location...I have 2 acres of my yard on a floodplain. In the middle is the source of a spring, and the far edge there is a creek. Atlanta is near, about 10 miles to the east. Etowah Indian Mounds are to the west about 10 miles. There was also a civil war battle in my yard as well. Plenty of bullets found there still. As I do metal detecting I decided to pull all strange looking "rocks" and put them in various piles. I've done this for the past 2 years and I have quite a mess..or eh, treasure. I just let the rain weather off the thick Georgia clay from the "rock piles" over the span of time and finally have something to show. I'll need a considerable amount of space to put the pictures of all the things I've found, but this forum is only allowing me a small amount right now. Check my last photo against the one Troodon posted here and let me know if you also think they are from the same beautiful beast. Mine is almost a foot long and half a foot wide and weighs just under 1 Thor's hammer. Actually - it weighs 18 pounds. That's about 3 pounds heavier than the egg shaped thing I found near it (not pictured). (note: pic above is from Troodon's thread here: "http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/81257-my-jurassic-park-ankylosauria-hell-creeklance-formation/" As compared to pics from my yard below:
  24. JurassicParkCarnotaurus

    Favorite Dino Fossils

    Hey guys, wasn’t sure where to put this but anyway here we go. I was wondering if any of you have or have pictures of some fossils of some of my or your favorite dinosaurs?(I know gryposuchus isn’t a Dino too ) They are the species tagged. I know they are very rare and hard to obtain but just thought I’d see. Thanks, and I look forward to seeing your collections!
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