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  1. readinghiker

    Unknown Coniacian selachians

    Hello all. I have found two more teeth that I have no clue about. The first one is very small, orectolobid size, but has a distinct central cusp and accessory cusps on both sides. The tooth is less than 1 1/4 mm in size, and I have never seen a tooth this small with accessory cusps. Any idea as to what it could be? The second one has a distinctive series of ridges on one side of the tooth. Again, I have no idea what it could be. Someone at the museum here suggested a multituberculate mammal, but I have serious doubts about that. The cusp is more selachian than mammal. I will
  2. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so sma
  3. readinghiker

    Unidentified shark

    Hey all! Still working on the Cabezon fauna, which looks to be never ending! I have, so far, over 16,000 fossils (mostly selachian teeth) recovered from ant hills. I just went out yesterday and got another 100 pounds of ant hill to go through. Although most of the teeth are scapanorhynchus and cretolamna, there are several other species represented, including some very small orectolobids. I also run across a few that I have not seen in the literature or in other museum collections, so I am going to post a few this week to pick your brains. The first one could be
  4. readinghiker

    Striated both lingually and labially!

    Hello all. Back again with another unknown species from the Cabezon Coniacian fauna. You people were a great help in identifying the Cretoxyrhina tooth that I posted a couple of days ago, hopefully, you can help with this. By far, the most common striated tooth found in this fauna is Scapanorhynchus, of which I have literally thousands of teeth. There are a few that are looking like Leptostyrax that we are researching. And then there is this one. Not only does it have striations on the lingual face, as one would imagine, but it also has striations on the labial face
  5. LSCHNELLE

    Early Coniacian Tooth ID Help

    I found this in Central Texas Basal Atco Conglomerate with Ptychodus latissimus and Ptychodus atcoensis. It is only about 15 mm to 20 mm tall, including a partially bilobed (?) root and worn tooth crown. Any ideas? Fish or squamate?
  6. Ludwigia

    Micraster cortestudinarium (Leske 1778)

    From the album: Echinodermata

    5x5cm. cortestudinarium zone Upper Chalk Formation Coniacian Late Cretaceous From Cuckmere, Sussex, England
  7. Ludwigia

    Conulus albogalerus (Leske 1778)

    From the album: Echinodermata

    4x3cm. Upper Chalk Formation Coniacian Late Cretaceous From Seaford, Sussex, England
  8. fifbrindacier

    Cupulina

    Found near Saumur. The rocks are Coniacian to Santonian.
  9. readinghiker

    Unknown selachian

    Moving on to another species. Any ideas as to what this might be? I have six in the collection from the Cabezon fauna. This is the only complete one (with all of the root). I will send four pictures . Thanks! Randy
  10. I am right now out in the field, attempting to extract a string of articulated reptile vertebrae in the lower Atco. It is in a soft marl bed just a few feet above the basal Atco. There seems to be articulated ribs associated with the specimen, and so far I have uncovered 14 verts. 9 of them were lose of the surface and bagged in ziplocks, but now I am trying to get the rest out. If anyone has any advice, I need it! The specimen also has articulated ribs. I want to get this thing home tonight, and not destroyed. This is is my first time attempting to extract vertebrae, and I want to
  11. I have been doing more research on my unidentified Middle/Upper Coniacian heteromorph ammonite that I posted pictures and information on here, and with lots of papers and information from Keith Minor I think that I have narrowed it down to two ammonite genera, Neocrioceras and Pseudoxybeloceras. He sent lots of very helpful papers including Kennedy and Cobban's 1991 paper Coniacian ammonite faunas from the United States Western Interior. It includes pictures and information on 3 species of Neocrioceras and one species of Pseudoxybeloceras from the Coniacian Western Interior. Keith also emailed
  12. readinghiker

    Cretolamnid?

    Back again for more information. These teeth are driving me nuts. I am working on a Coniacian deposit from north central New Mexico, and have gotten around 20,000 fossils from sifting and screen washing ant hills. The vast majority are scapanorhynchids (over 12,000), but there are at least 25 other species represented. These teeth come from a possible barrier island deposit, and the wave action prior to fossilization must have been intense, since almost all the teeth are missing roots. There are around 1500 teeth that look like scapanorhyncus cf. raphiodon, but they have no
  13. Heteromorph

    Silly Season

    It’s that time of year... Ancient Marine Fossils Unearthed in Plano, nbcdfw.com
  14. Heteromorph

    Coniacian Glyptoxoceras?

    Is anyone aware of any Glyptoxoceras sp. in the Coniacian? @doushantuo, I know that you are good at digging up information like this. Can you find anything?
  15. I found this Phlycticrioceras trinodosum heteromorph specimen in June of 2018 whilst hunting the middle/upper Coniacian Atco formation. It is the largest fragment of this species that I am aware of, having a whorl height of 51 mm as opposed to 47 mm of the largest fragment I've seen published. This genus is a bigger, rarer, and (mostly) younger cousin of Allocrioceras. I sent pictures of it to Keith Minor and he pointed out that there was also an echinoid sticking out of the specimen, something which I had totally missed! With much of the echinoid still stuck in the living chamber it is hard t
  16. readinghiker

    Scapanorhynchus

    I want to tap into all of the expertise that is on this site again! I am doing research on a faunal assemblage of the Coniacian age from north central New Mexico. It is quite a large grouping, with over 12,000 teeth from over 25 species. I am currently working on scapanorhynchus, and am looking for some guidance. Some of the teeth have labial plications, and Cicimurri et. al. argues that this is most likely due to ontogenetic reasons. However, this paper is the only one I can find that even mentions labial plications on Western Interior Seaway scapanorhynchids. Do you have any t
  17. readinghiker

    Psuedocorax

    Hey all, I am once again coming to you, as this board has some incredible people on it with a vast wealth of knowledge. I have a question about the genus Pseudocorax. Do they have serrations, or don't they? Welton and Farrish write that the crowns of P. granti are smooth..."cutting edges smooth and very thin." Yet I see photos on the net of P. affinis that definitely have serrations. Does ones specie of Pseudocorax have serrations while another doesn't? Thank you in advance for any information relating to this! Randy
  18. readinghiker

    Squalicorax

    Hey everyone, I don't have a lot of comparative material at hand, so I am asking for your help. I am working on a large shark fauna from the Cabezon area of New Mexico. The teeth are very beat up, possibly due to wave action on offshore sand bars. However, upon close inspection of the better teeth I have discovered that the serrations on the lingual side of the teeth contain indentations (or possible enable folding...see the photo). I have some squalicorax teeth from the Turonian, about 25 miles from this site, that were described in the New Mexico Museum o
  19. readinghiker

    Asking for more squalicorax help

    I have done some more research on the squalicorax that I posted about a few weeks ago. I ended up examining 886 teeth or fragments thereof. Of these, 79 showed a fossilization process in which the serrations (and sometimes the whole cusp) was covered with a white mineral. 48 were so worn that sometimes the serrations could barely be made out. 254 were too small or fragmented to be of any use (which does not preclude that they were of the same species as the rest). The remaining 632 all had the ornamentation that is so unusual. They can be found only on the labia
  20. At a site where I have been finding heteromorphs, I have recently come across some vertebrate material. So far I have only found three vertebrate specimens; one bone fragment and two fish scales. I am hoping to get some information on their affinities. I am most interested in the fish scales, since it seems they would be the most easily identified. The site is in North Texas, the Austin Chalk group, Atco formation, upper Coniacian stage. For biostratigraphic reference, at this same site I have also found the ammonites Protexanites planatus, Phlycticrioceras trinodosum, Tridenticer
  21. During april i and a friend had the oportunity to spend a few days hunting in cretaceous of Normandy, hunting for echinoids. Day one : We drove from brittany through Le Havre to Saint Jouin de Bruneval and Antifer Cape. (3 hours and a half) We let the car on the beach parking lot and hiked south on the peeble shore looking for fossils in the boulders on the beach. The cliff is cenomanian with a bit of albian at the bottom. You have to look carefully on rocks surface for the familliar spherical shape. I found about 20 urchins but thats about it. No shark to
  22. elcoincoin

    Kingena elegans

    From the album: Haute normandie - April 2018

    Kingena elegans : a cretaceous brachiopod from Senneville sur Fécamp
  23. elcoincoin

    Echinoids : best from the april 2018 hunt

    From the album: Haute normandie - April 2018

    Last hunt from Normandy cretaceous : best of echinoids
  24. elcoincoin

    Echinocorys gravesii - 2

    From the album: Haute normandie - April 2018

    Echinocorys gravesii : an echinoid from Normandy cretaceous.
  25. elcoincoin

    Echinocorys gravesii - 1 - 1

    From the album: Haute normandie - April 2018

    Echinocorys gravesii : an echinoid from Normandy cretaceous.
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