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Found 7 results

  1. Triceratops horridus (or prorsus) (Marsh, 1889 /1890) Late Cretaceous, c. 67 Ma Hell Creek Formation, Powder River Co., Montana After acquiring a gorgeous T. rex tooth, I could not resist the opportunity of acquiring a tooth of its likely prey - Triceratops. I’m aware of the difficulty in identifying ceratopsian teeth and the impossibility of distinguishing between T. horridus and T. prorus. As Triceratops is the most commonly encountered genus within the HCF, this is labelled as being Triceratops horridus or prorus in my collection. I understand that the locality is known for T. prorus so it may well be that this is T. prorus. I love this specimen for it still having the root - so unlikely to be a shed tooth.
  2. Fullux

    Triceratops frill?

    This piece was found in wyoming and was prepped in the field, described as a section of triceratops frill, is that accurate?
  3. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA More information
  4. So over the past few days I was visiting Bozeman from Raleigh North Carolina as I was visiting the MSU campus because I've been accepted to start as a freshman in autumn 2021. And I hope you know what I am trying to major in. I mean you know what forum we're on I don't have to spell it out. Anyway, in that time I managed to spend all day visiting the Museum of the Rockies which is considered one of the Mecca halls for paleontology. Our crazy old boi Jack used to be Prof and curator there before... well you know. My home museum, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences are taxonomic lumpers when it comes to paleontology but they are passive lumpers. They are nothing compared to what the MOR has going on holy snarge I was surprised. I like going to different museums like this because it shows different perspectives based on findings that vary by institution. While I don't agree with a lot of it, it's healthy to expose oneself to different ideas and conclusions. Also I just couldn't help but feel giddy in the midst of all these dinosaurs. I'll update this post with pictures in a few moments... I will also post what the info cards on the exhibits state about each specimen. Here is Big Mike. A metal replica of MOR 555 commonly known as the Wankel although now more known as the Nation's T. rex since the og skeleton's move to the Smithsonian. I spent at least 30 minutes admiring the sculpt of this beautiful beast alone. Our first is a tibia of a Hadrosaur indet. found in 80 mya rock in Chotaeu, Montana so likely the Two Medicine Formation however this is unique because this is from it's lower strata which we don't know much about that's why it isn't identified as Maiasaura, as that dinosaur lived later. Here are some nice trace fossils and geology stuff, Here's the Precambrian globe Here's how sediments move through time. There's dioramas too. Starting with the Cambrian of course with Anomalocaris and working our way up. Here we're getting some Ordivician and Silurian description, Devonian like creatures. Although Coelocanths first evolved 400 mya they live all the way up to the present day. Stethocanthus below Next we start going in depth into the dinosaurs more updates coming stay tuned...
  5. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA 3.5 cm height On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm., so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example), only association with an identifiable skull can allow for identification beyond Ceratopsidae indet. Fossil in Collections: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/triceratops-prorsus-tooth-r2122/
  6. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus Tooth

    Identification: On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm.[2], so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example), only association with an identifiable skull can allow for identification beyond Ceratopsidae indet. Notes: This tooth is partially rooted with noticeable feeding wear on the crown (the flattened surface). It has some minor repair. The second image shows a close view of the enamel, which has good preservation. Relevant Literature: 1. MARSH, OTHNIEL C., 1889. Notice of gigantic horned Dinosauria from the Cretaceous. The American Journal of Science, Series 3 38: 173-175. 2. SCANNELLA, J. B.; FOWLER, D. W., 2009. Anagenesis in Triceratops: evidence from a newly resolved stratigraphic framework for the Hell Creek Formation. 9th North American Paleontological Convention Abstracts. Cincinnati Museum Center Scientific Contributions 3. pp. 148–149.
  7. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA This is a nice tooth with great enamel, partially rooted, and has some feeding wear (which I enjoy). It does have some repair/consolidation. Usually, Ceratopsian teeth are indistinguishable from each other. In HC, Torosaurus and Triceratops (currently) are the valid genera. However, the company operating on the ranch where this tooth was found has only found T. prorsus skulls in the 30+ years they've been there. This tooth, being found in the same deposit, therefore has a good probability of being from T. prorsus.
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