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Echies of Texas (Part 6) - A Dry Spell Broken


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It has been a while since I did an Echies of Texas post...too long!! But it's been an echinoid dry spell here for me.....I've found some lovely stuff, but just not anything NEW to me! I was given a couple of Echies that were new to me but I didn't TECHNICALLY find them, so they don't really count (for me...i'm particular that way!) . I will post pics of them because I am happy to have them in my collection regardless!! BUT, back to my personal urchin drought.  . It's getting hot in Texas (Summertime...duh). But I still like to get out occasionally.  I went a little further afield  last week (only taking short day trips during this Covid Time) than my usual hunting grounds and found a new spot of Glen Rose Formation and found....AN URCHIN NEST! I've heard about these...a clump of multiple echies in one spot. I was too excited about my find and forgot to take pictures but there were five phymosomas in one spot...big ones too!  And then a little further along....my first Tetragramma from the Glen Rose Formation! YAY! Drought broken!  And, when it rains it pours. A few days later at another Glen Rose spot...i found more Tetras. And....I am pretty sure....a Polydiadema! So, needless to say, my Echie Game is back on. There are quite a few specific urchins that are still eluding me and not for lack of trying! I have been to the only spots I know of that I know they have been found, but alas.  So the search continues! 

 

 

Another recent find, not new to me, but a really nicely preserved Phymosoma : (from a site just up the road from the Echie "nest")

5f10ca39f0168_EchinoidPhymosoma190best).thumb.jpg.ba4bf1f6399bc8b2aab6bebd5df9e8fa.jpg

 

My first Tetragramma from the Glen Rose:  Tetragramma tenerum .....i think. 

5f10ca3cccddc_EchinoidTetragrammatenerumLampasasbest).thumb.jpg.43ef6811a809a9a6c08fcfdc81a1f033.jpg

 

The Echinoid "nest"  (plus the nice phymo from the other site up the road)

 

105898587_10223176838479379_1073954138024115904_o.thumb.jpg.3b06d02cbe2f324986bbb68a6ed962fe.jpg

 

 

My biggest Phymosoma to date....2 1/4 inches

 

5f10ca3bc2f0d_EchinoidPhymosomaGlenRoseLometa.thumb.JPG.bc7a69a81b500e4fbe0acc1ca38301ce.JPG

 

Another Tetragramma from the Glen Rose: 

DSCN2788.thumb.JPG.e96d5f99a139c3d17781eca72ace4bf2.JPG

 

And I THNK....a Polydiadema! 

DSCN2795.thumb.JPG.95446c7ae9e2378059e2551f6e6388fb.JPG

 

Plus a nice little Heteraster with good detail 

DSCN2773.thumb.JPG.9391b378d1d30aca5aa2ff5a28f0017b.JPG

 

 

 

Plus - My "acquisitions" to my collection thanks to my Fossil Friend John (who so kindly gave them to me!) 

An amazing Paracidarid (Glen Rose Formation) 

5f10ca38dcdf1_EchinoidParacidaridBlancoGR(2).thumb.JPG.9da77db747a18f95a487d1e4a9519a49.JPG

 

And a Globator parryi

5f10cd402089a_EchinoidGlobatorLakeTexoma(1).thumb.JPG.5331bc6aadc2ad1372e47d8ae44b4d18.JPG

 

bottom of Globator:

5f10cd74222bf_EchinoidGlobatorLakeTexoma(2).thumb.JPG.3511de8e7c5cfd62a250f50a0817541a.JPG

 

 

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51 minutes ago, JamieLynn said:

Globator parri 

Nice Echinoids. I’ve never heard of this species. Looks like Echinolampas.

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4 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

Nice Echinoids. I’ve never heard of this species. Looks like Echinolampas.

 

It does look very similar. I believe this one is only in Texas and New Mexico (according to the Cretaceous Atlas of Life website .  I can't tell from the pics if Echinolampas has the circular pattern on the surface. but otherwise they look alike! 

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caterpillar

Your Tetragramma (photo 2) is not one. Tubercules are not perforated. I think it's a Phymosoma.

Your Tetragramma (photo 5) is not one. The pores pairs are not becoming beserially offset adapically. Maybe a Polydiadema.

Your Globator is not one. The ambulacral zones and the periproct don't match. Certainly an Echinolampas

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6 hours ago, caterpillar said:

Your Tetragramma (photo 2) is not one. Tubercules are not perforated. I think it's a Phymosoma.

Your Tetragramma (photo 5) is not one. The pores pairs are not becoming beserially offset adapically. Maybe a Polydiadema.

Your Globator is not one. The ambulacral zones and the periproct don't match. Certainly an Echinolampas

 

Here is a close up of the side of Photo 2.  It shows better the perforations: I think the others are just worn down so don't all have perforations. It's pretty beat up! 

So let me know what you think. 

5f11a6ef3583a_EchinoidTetragrammaLampasas(2).thumb.JPG.a7f9b7195394adc71ade765404068244.JPG

 

Thank for the info on the other Tetra (Polydiadema) I knew there was something that distinguished the two, but I couldn't quite figure i out. 

As for the Echinolampas - I have not heard of them being found in Texas. Any Texas Echinoid Experts willing to weigh in on this?  @erose  @Uncle Siphuncle or @JohnJ

 

 

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If I'm not mistaken, Echinolampas' distribution is restricted to Eocene to present exposures. 

 

Did you find the "Globator"  in an Eocene exposure, or was it perhaps (just a guess here) L. Cretaceous, U. Trinity, Glen Rose fm.?

 

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Definitely not Eocene. It was found at Lake Texoma, so Cretaceous, not sure what formation. 

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4 minutes ago, JamieLynn said:

Lake Texoma, so Cretaceous,

So, L. Cretaceous, Washata Group.

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I would be interested in hearing @Uncle Siphuncle 's opinion on the Globator echinoid. I'm not sure how this ended up at Lake Texoma but I would bet money it is an Echinolampas appendiculata from the Eocene of North Carolina. Here's one from Ludwigia's gallery that even has the same oyster spat.

 

 

ea.jpg

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caterpillar
2 hours ago, JamieLynn said:

Here is a close up of the side of Photo 2.  It shows better the perforations

 

Indeed, this side is better. We can see the perforations. So, Tetragramma is correct

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DPS Ammonite

Globator parryi occurs in the Fort Worth Limestone which occurs around Lake Texoma. I looks similar to me.
 

See detail of a Globator parryi showing the ring structures from website below:

https://www.cretaceousatlas.org/species/globator-parryi/

C9EAB1E8-E574-42B1-AB27-634CA6EE4251.png

Edited by DPS Ammonite
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The ambulacra of Globators are continuous from top to bottom.  @JamieLynn, your specimen looks more like it has a "petal" type.

 

This is a 33 mm diameter Globator sp. from the Texas Washita Group.

 

0717201208b~3.jpg0717201209~3.jpg0717201212~3.jpg

 

(Jamie, sizes posted for all your echinoid would be useful.  ;))

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Yes I realized i should have put the size: Here is with measurement

107517311_10223389155067161_6449305585876333318_o.jpg

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DPS Ammonite
58 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

The ambulacra of Globators are continuous from top to bottom.  @JamieLynn, your specimen looks more like it has a "petal" type.

 

This is a 33 mm diameter Globator sp. from the Texas Washita Group.

 

0717201208b~3.jpg0717201209~3.jpg0717201212~3.jpg

 

(Jamie, sizes posted for all your echinoid would be useful.  ;))

The bottom of her purported Globator has traces of ambulacra. Does that mean that is still a petal type? Is this not a Globator species? It sort of looks like the ambulacra are not visible or are worn away on the sides. 
 

Don’t we still have as members (William Morgan and/or William Thompson) that wrote recent books on Texas urchins? Maybe they could help. They are much better than me giving IDs. @Bill Thompson
 

 

026D64C5-BB69-4A00-9B37-CF2EC9561566.jpeg

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Globator parryi has very distinct ambulacra.  Finsley describes this urchin in his field guide as "off round to slightly pentagonal".  Jamie's specimen seems to display a different morphology.

 

From Finsley's A Field Guide to Fossils of Texas

0717201348~2.jpg

 

I have greater confidence in the research by Morgan and Finsley.

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3 hours ago, JohnJ said:

Globator parryi has very distinct ambulacra.  Finsley describes this urchin in his field guide as "off round to slightly pentagonal".  Jamie's specimen seems to display a different morphology.

 

From Finsley's A Field Guide to Fossils of Texas

0717201348~2.jpg

 

I have greater confidence in the research by Morgan and Finsley.

 

Do you have an idea of what it might be @JohnJ ?

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It's hard to say given these images.  Is the apical system off center of the urchin?  Can you get any clearer images of the apical system...maybe damp?

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I will work on that

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DPS Ammonite
3 hours ago, JamieLynn said:

@JohnJ

 

DSCN2834.thumb.JPG.dfc1c8e93f28bc56f300bd9ba39bc904.JPG

 

DSCN2837.thumb.JPG.f4ad42656193e53976b870a1070253d4.JPG

 

DSCN2833.thumb.JPG.a6fd70e2d668d068a8cd3333c9317041.JPG

I assume that the ambulacra were once more prominently visible from top to bottom since traces are found on the bottom. They might have been partially eroded away/eaten due to the test having been exposed at the surface of the sediment before burial as evidenced by the growth of oysters on the test. This test might have been rolled since it has oysters on both sides. Hopefully more experts will chime in and help ID this less than perfect piece, but still neat piece.

 

Has any one else ever found a Globator in the Lake Texoma area? If so, what formation?

Edited by DPS Ammonite
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I can't help with the ID, but those are some nice little echies! I don't find them in my stomping grounds so I am a little :envy:

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caterpillar

Definitively not a Globator. I stay on Echinolampas

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I am not very familiar with the Washita echinoid fauna and have never collected Globator or Echinolampas.  But I do have a handful of Coenholectypus that feature that same puckering out at the periproct. It seems to be one of the possible variations I see in C. planatus.  Just like some are very round and others distinctly pentagonal.  As always more specimens are needed...

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