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ThePhysicist

Hey y'all, recently got this Cretaceous mammal molar from the Lance Fm., Weston Co., WY. It's about 8 mm long. I'm thinking Didelphodon sp.@jpc

 

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PaleoNoel

Looks much more like a multituberculate molar based on the humps of the teeth. Here is an example of one I found in matrix from the Lance fm. in the same county as your tooth. Just over a millimeter in length, by far the smallest mammal tooth in my collection and one of my smallest vertebrate fossils overall.

60146cf5300bd_TinyMultiTooth2.thumb.JPG.b2ea2fa829605fbc009902fe6da5a201.JPG

And a larger specimen I found in South Dakota's Hell Creek.

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@jpc @Troodon

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Not Didelphodon.  This is a multituberculate molar, and big, with grooved cusps... Meniscoessus, the only large multi in the Lance.

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ThePhysicist

Thanks, @jpc! I thought it was pretty big too. How large did these guys get?  What did they eat, just curious?

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PaleoNoel
15 minutes ago, ThePhysicist said:

What did they eat, just curious?

Multituberculates had some of the most interesting and bizarre dentitions among all mammals which has made inferring their diet difficult. In my opinion they would be proficient omnivores, as you may see in rats today as Meniscoessus is thought to fit into that size range in some species. The many cusps of their molars seem fit to crush seeds, but would also be well suited to munching the exoskeletons of insects. 

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Location: M2

Screenshot_20210210-080041_Drive.jpg.feb6ee942d4219ba470dfd2c36260514.jpg

 

A SPECIMEN OF THE UPPER CRETACEOUS MULTITUBERCULATE MENISCOI.SSUS BY GEORGE GAYLORD SIMPSON

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Shellseeker

I always like to get a feeling for what an animal looks like, and sometimes the graphics artists comply:

image.png.c8d73571ee4b6e2dbeb71f0c127958ae.png

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3 minutes ago, Shellseeker said:

I always like to get a feeling for what an animal looks like, and sometimes the graphics artists comply:

image.png.c8d73571ee4b6e2dbeb71f0c127958ae.png

Nice drawing.  There are strong arguments for multituberculates having a scaly tail like an opposum.  

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doushantuo

possibly a m1 of Meniscoessus robustus?

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doushantuo

as regards ecology:

weaver1.jpg

this paper uses a somewhat quantitative approach to occlusion and it's a pretty good read,BTW

 

 

 

 

 

 

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