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Peccary versus Modern Pig


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Shellseeker

I hunt frequently. I find what I believe to be peccary teeth not infrequently.  As we know , there is a problem. Modern pigs (domestic, wild, boars) have peccaries as ancestors. Teeth of modern pigs and peccaries are similar. Are the differences significant enough to be able to easily differentiate the two species. I thought they were.

I am going to use a couple of @Harry Pristis fantastic photos, which remain the best resource for this discussion. In this photo of domestic pig from Florida, note the circular petal nature of of the chewing surface on each tooth.. Sort of reminds me of Gomphothere teeth.

post-SusScrofa.thumb.jpg.07ba618d9104c6eb4f1413c40d20eb1d.jpg

 

Next ,lets look at Peccary: Mylohyus is a Pleistocene version of the species. Note the straighter lines down the center and less obvious or none existent circular petals.

peccary_mylohyus.jpg.d563b846fceb3db9e2d1beee750cf027.jpg

I found this one a couple of years back Pliocene peccary is Platygonus bicalaratus. Peccary teeth look more like Mastodon than Gomphothere.

e2018Jan1stPlatygonus_bicalaratus.thumb.jpg.b2264fabf801194706a945ec0afa45b8.jpg

 

So, why present how I differentiate?  One is to ask if others use different techniques, and the other is that I just found a tooth in the Peace River,  that I thought was Peccary (Mylohyus) and my hunting companion, who has done this longer than I felt was domestic Pig. 

I am seeking an identification: The tooth is 15.5 mm in length and 14.5 mm in width. Thanks for the help. @PODIGGER @Plantguy @digit

IMG_8259Crop.thumb.jpg.f3cbf59ab62a1b443fb350b54a6b5375.jpgIMG_8260Crop.jpg.54ae1a33b502ce5090f47e4c2eb93439.jpgIMG_8261Peccary.jpg.ad68f337a47f95ba7f80b0a40fa3d213.jpgIMG_8267.JPEG.e531cd7834f7227b2fdbeb9d2920e151.JPEG

 

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Harry Pristis

"Modern pigs (domestic, wild, boars) have peccaries as ancestors."

 

More accurately, pigs and peccaries have a common ancestor.

 

234017987_artiodactylpigphylogeny.JPG.59314bfaf62c81bc6b4e4932bc8c4e66.JPG

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Harry Pristis

This phylogeny is more descriptive, I think.

 

1624904531_pigsSingle-most-parsimonious-tree-from-implied-weighting-analysis-with-temporal-distribution.jpg.531154f452adb5b02f9e966ca48a4654.jpg

 

 

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Shellseeker
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Harry Pristis said:

This phylogeny is more descriptive, I think.

 

1624904531_pigsSingle-most-parsimonious-tree-from-implied-weighting-analysis-with-temporal-distribution.jpg.531154f452adb5b02f9e966ca48a4654.jpg

 

Harry,  I am getting a 404 trying to access???  Just me ?  Got it !!!

 

Single most parsimonious tree from implied weighting analysis with temporal distribution of the taxa. Drawings by Barbara Rossi

Edited by Shellseeker
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Shellseeker

I love the chart , Harry.  Thanks for finding it.

However, I am not sure that it helps me in identifying those fossils that I find or even those fossils that I have the opportunity to find in my hunting grounds.

From my above photo, I would have to consider whether I indeed have a Platygonini and is it Bicalaratus? , which species of Mylohyus do we have in Bone valley?

And, after figuring what is possible,  how to differentiate  or not...   Jack

 

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Plantguy

Hey Jack, I like the discussion but I'm completely ignorant about these guys but intrigued. I dont have time to go thru this article with a fine tooth comb but maybe you do...have you seen this by Hulbert? Seems to discuss this Pleistocene type and the older Tayassuids.. and may or may not help with your ID questions. I'm not sure if there are anymore current pubs...

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257618845_Collared_peccary_Mammalia_Artiodactyla_Tayassuidae_Pecari_from_the_late_Pleistocene_of_Florida

ResearchGate

 

Chapter · January 2009

 
In book: Papers on Geology, Vertebrate Paleontology, and Biostratigraphy in Honor of Michael O. Woodburne (pp.543-555)
  • Publisher: Museum of Northern Arizona
  • Editors: L. B. Albright III

Collared peccary (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae, Pecari) from the late Pleistocene of Florida. Has discussion about a number of peccaries here in Florida

 

ABSTRACT—For the past 50 years, all Pleistocene tayassuids from the United States have been referred to either Platygonus or Mylohyus. Underwater excavation of an in situ deposit on the bed of the Peace River in De Soto County, Florida, recovered a late Pleistocene (Rancholabrean) fauna of freshwater and terrestrial vertebrates. Here named the Peace River 5A local fauna, it consists of a minimum of 34 taxa, of which 16 are extinct, including Bison antiquus, Platygonus compressus, Tapirus veroensis, Holmesina septentrionalis, Glyptotherium floridanum, and Canis dirus. A partial dentary with p4-m3 of a tayassuid was collected from the lowest layer of the deposit with fossils of Pleistocene megafauna. Its teeth are significantly smaller and morphologically different than those of Platygonus and Mylohyus, as well as those from late Miocene and early Pliocene tayassuids and the extant peccaries Catagonus and Tayassu. The best match, in terms of both size and morphology, is the extant collared peccary, Pecari tajacu. Two fossils from other sites in Florida, both isolated m3s, also represent Pecari. Together, the three specimens demonstrate that a third peccary, here referred to Pecari sp., was present in peninsular Florida at some point during the late Pleistocene, and that competitive exclusion by Platygonus and/or Mylohyus was not an overriding factor in the Pleistocene distribution of Pecari.

 

Regards, Chris 

Hulbertetal.2009.pdf

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Shellseeker
20 minutes ago, Plantguy said:

Hey Jack, I like the discussion but I'm completely ignorant about these guys but intrigued. I dont have time to go thru this article with a fine tooth comb but maybe you do...have you seen this by Hulbert? Seems to discuss this Pleistocene type and the older Tayassuids.. and may or may not help with your ID questions. I'm not sure if there are anymore current pubs...

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257618845_Collared_peccary_Mammalia_Artiodactyla_Tayassuidae_Pecari_from_the_late_Pleistocene_of_Florida

ResearchGate

 

Chapter · January 2009

 
In book: Papers on Geology, Vertebrate Paleontology, and Biostratigraphy in Honor of Michael O. Woodburne (pp.543-555)
  • Publisher: Museum of Northern Arizona
  • Editors: L. B. Albright III

Collared peccary (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae, Pecari) from the late Pleistocene of Florida. Has discussion about a number of peccaries here in Florida

 

ABSTRACT—For the past 50 years, all Pleistocene tayassuids from the United States have been referred to either Platygonus or Mylohyus. Underwater excavation of an in situ deposit on the bed of the Peace River in De Soto County, Florida, recovered a late Pleistocene (Rancholabrean) fauna of freshwater and terrestrial vertebrates. Here named the Peace River 5A local fauna, it consists of a minimum of 34 taxa, of which 16 are extinct, including Bison antiquus, Platygonus compressus, Tapirus veroensis, Holmesina septentrionalis, Glyptotherium floridanum, and Canis dirus. A partial dentary with p4-m3 of a tayassuid was collected from the lowest layer of the deposit with fossils of Pleistocene megafauna. Its teeth are significantly smaller and morphologically different than those of Platygonus and Mylohyus, as well as those from late Miocene and early Pliocene tayassuids and the extant peccaries Catagonus and Tayassu. The best match, in terms of both size and morphology, is the extant collared peccary, Pecari tajacu. Two fossils from other sites in Florida, both isolated m3s, also represent Pecari. Together, the three specimens demonstrate that a third peccary, here referred to Pecari sp., was present in peninsular Florida at some point during the late Pleistocene, and that competitive exclusion by Platygonus and/or Mylohyus was not an overriding factor in the Pleistocene distribution of Pecari.

 

Regards, Chris 

Hulbertetal.2009.pdf 627.05 kB · 1 download

Well, Thanks Chris  !! I have not read this , but will make the time.. My efforts are always driven by my finds.  I will report what I think about it. 

Going out in the morning.   Jack

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