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Bucket List Birthday! Texas Mosasaur!!


JamieLynn

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You may or may not know that I have been obsessing over finding a mosasaur vertebra and tooth. I am lucky to live in Texas where fossils are plentiful in some areas but the most productive mosasaur area is still 6 hours drive from me. So I don't get there often and the few times I have.....no verts or teeth for me. I am not complaining (too much) because I have found other great things in the North Sulphur River, but not the mosie vert or tooth of my dreams. I am lucky to have friends who hunt there regularly who feel sorry for me and give me verts and even a lovely big tooth. But I DIDN'T FIND THEM. 

 

I do know that mosie stuff can be found in Central Texas where I live (thanks to @Jared C and his amazing adventures) I know they can be found (although very rarely) in our local creeks and such. So of course I keep an eye out while hunting but with no real hope of finding them. But I hope anyways!

 

Which brings me to today....which I count as part of my birthday weekend (birthday was Friday, but you know.....weekend still counts! ). Went out on a little fossil hunt to a new site that a friend told me about...lots of baculites (which are relatively rare here in Central Texas) and lo and behold.....I FOUND MY VERT! And not two feet away....a little tooth!  Mother Nature decided to gift me not just one, but TWO of my bucket list fossil finds today! Granted, they are pretty busted up and the tooth is not complete, but WHO CARES! I FOUND A MOSASAUR VERT AND TOOTH practically in my own backyard!!!! 

 

Turns out this little exposure is Ozan Formation and I can't wait to get back out there again....after a good rain! And, to top it off, found a complete ammonite in addition to some lovely gastropods and about a billion baculites. 

It's no mosie in situ, but I'll take what I am gifted. Thank you Mother Nature!!!

 

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First off, Happy Belated Birthday!:yay-smiley-1:

Secondly, congratulations on finding your Bucket list items! I am very happy for you!:Smiling:

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I like Trilo-butts and I cannot lie.

 

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Kudos and congratulations, Jamie!

The human mind has the ability to believe anything is true.  -  JJ

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Nice finds,  JamieLynn!
Congratulations, and a Happy Belated Birthday!

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    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

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__________________________________________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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Congratulations and Happy Birthday!

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Fin Lover

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My favorite things about fossil hunting: getting out of my own head, getting into nature and, if I’m lucky, finding some cool souvenirs.

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:yay-smiley-1:
 

I’m happy for you!  Nothing like finding something you’ve been looking for so long… seems like the longer something takes to find, the more meaningful it is.

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-Jay

 

 

 

''...science is eminently perfectible, and that each theory has constantly to give way to a fresh one.''

-Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne

 

 

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that's a pretty red tooth, never seen or heard of coloration like that in the Ozan, reminds me of what's expected from the maastrichtian stuff. Nice find!

“Not only is the universe stranger than we think, it is stranger than we can think” -Werner Heisenberg 

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@Jared C I have changed my assessment of the formation and I think it's Austin Chalk now. It says Ozan on the Texas USGS website, but according to the stuff I've found there, I am pretty sure its Austin Chalk 

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Happy Birthday and congratulations on your finds!

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Congrats! Nothing better than a mosasaur tooth! The fossils of your site are pretty interesting. I've never seen nautiloids out of the Ozan in Central TX, so maybe that does lend support for this being Austin Chalk as well.

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The color of the matrix and the phosphatic molds remind me of the Corsicana 

Edited by historianmichael

Follow me on Instagram (@fossil_mike) to check out my personal collection of fossils collected and acquired over more than 15 years of fossil hunting!

 

 

 

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@historianmichael yes, it is definitely that same yellowy stuff like Corsicana but none of the fossils I think of as representative of the  Corsicana were there, no echinoids at all, no Plicatula bivalves. There were large Exogyra laevisculas, but no crostatas,  some small Trigonias which were definitely not castrovillensis but looked more like thoracia which is Austin Chalk.  The nautiloid and baculites are the only thing that were the same as Corsicana.

 

But I agree, the matrix is what's really confusing me.....it looks nothing like any Austin Chalk I've encountered. 

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29 minutes ago, JamieLynn said:

@historianmichael yes, it is definitely that same yellowy stuff like Corsicana but none of the fossils I think of as representative of the  Corsicana were there, no echinoids at all, no Plicatula bivalves. There were large Exogyra laevisculas, but no crostatas,  some small Trigonias which were definitely not castrovillensis but looked more like thoracia which is Austin Chalk.  The nautiloid and baculites are the only thing that were the same as Corsicana.

 

But I agree, the matrix is what's really confusing me.....it looks nothing like any Austin Chalk I've encountered. 

If you do not have Exogyra costata, you are not in the Maastrichtian, which rules out Corsicana 

Follow me on Instagram (@fossil_mike) to check out my personal collection of fossils collected and acquired over more than 15 years of fossil hunting!

 

 

 

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Well done, congratulation!  And Happy Birthday!  You can easily have a birthday weekend, my daughters always try to claim the whole month!  haha

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It's always fun to find something new at a new site. Congrats! And nice to have that around your birthday time. I'm not an expert on the Ozan by any means. But the buff to yellow-brown color of the matrix in your field pics makes me think of the UT Bureau of Economic Geology designation by Keith Young as "Sprinkle Clay" (Lower Taylor Clay/Marl). I think most of you folks would use the USGS terminology Ozan Formation instead. Back from when I was in my 20's, I experienced directly the kind of fossils that might be found in the Sprinkle. My very limited experience with the Corsicana Marl (aka part of the USGS Navarro Clay Formation) is that it is often gray colored in an unweathered state and can be buff or yellow brown in an exposed and oxidized state. I don't know about the ammonite that you found, but I think that a Mosasaur tooth and vert would be possible in any of the above formations. The Del Rio Clay might also show that kind of buff coloring in Central Texas, but you certainly would NOT find mosasaur material in that formation.

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Congrats and Happy Belated Birthday, JamieLynn! :yay-smiley-1:

The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.  -Neil deGrasse Tyson

 

Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don't. -Bill Nye (The Science Guy)

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A very happy birthday to you and congrats on your great finds.

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Hi,

 

Happy birthday late !

 

Coco

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----------------------
OUTIL POUR MESURER VOS FOSSILES : ici

Ma bibliothèque PDF 1 (Poissons et sélaciens récents & fossiles) : ici
Ma bibliothèque PDF 2 (Animaux vivants - sans poissons ni sélaciens) : ici
Mâchoires sélaciennes récentes : ici
Hétérodontiques et sélaciens : ici
Oeufs sélaciens récents : ici
Otolithes de poissons récents ! ici

Un Greg...

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A very happy birthday indeed. Adding to your collection has to be one of the best ways to celebrate it. Congrats and thanks for sharing. 

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Congrats!  

'Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.'

George Santayana

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