Jump to content

izak_

Recommended Posts

Thanks for sharing. I am so excited to see how this progresses. Keep posting!!!

  • Thank You 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, this is definitely xenacanth. I'm not even sure which taxa make it into the Triassic but this is a phenomenal specimen that ought to be brought to the attention of Australian paleoichthyologists. 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, jdp said:

Yes, this is definitely xenacanth. I'm not even sure which taxa make it into the Triassic but this is a phenomenal specimen that ought to be brought to the attention of Australian paleoichthyologists. 

 

I have been chatting to a couple of them about it, one is working on revising this taxon. He has provided some very useful papers on xenacanth skull morphology which I've used as reference. I believe it will be placed in the genus Mooreodontus. 

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Woah, what formation is this? This seems amazingly well preserved. Has the xenacanth material from this site been described?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Petalodus12 said:

Woah, what formation is this? This seems amazingly well preserved. Has the xenacanth material from this site been described?

Sorry, just saw @jdp's reply. Glad that this specimen has been brought to the attention of some Australian paleo peeps. Still in awe of this thing, though, its incredible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Petalodus12 said:

Sorry, just saw @jdp's reply. Glad that this specimen has been brought to the attention of some Australian paleo peeps. Still in awe of this thing, though, its incredible.

 

Thank you! :) Xenacanths have been known from here for a long time, there are some spectacular complete specimens which have been collected. Woodward first described them in 1908. I haven't seen any specimens which have been prepared like this though, most skulls are preserved side on and split right through the middle. This one should be special as it shows the skull morphology well. 

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, izak_ said:

 

Thank you! :) Xenacanths have been known from here for a long time, there are some spectacular complete specimens which have been collected. Woodward first described them in 1908. I haven't seen any specimens which have been prepared like this though, most skulls are preserved side on and split right through the middle. This one should be special as it shows the skull morphology well. 

Incredible. Glad that this material is getting attention. Also, amazing prep job!!!!

  • Thank You 1
  • I Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing this.  I'm so impressed with your ability to recognize this diamond in the rough and the care you've taken to expose it.  Most of my finds are discovered by picking them up off a sandbar and hosing them down.  I take it for granted.  Your level of dedication to exploration is inspiring.

  • I Agree 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...