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Possible meteorite!?


May3am

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anyone have any idea about this one...  not magnetic at all.

 

photo_2024-04-23_02-46-56.thumb.jpg.bc31118f004c2828b09029d752ee504d.jpgphoto_2024-04-23_02-46-51.thumb.jpg.a09d2905c2aacea8d2a9dc6d1975d4b7.jpgphoto_2024-04-23_02-46-43.thumb.jpg.c48da7e438cb8645cc48a3c0b6147eff.jpgphoto_2024-04-23_02-47-08.thumb.jpg.d1e739fcf059be13b9e89a92715998c8.jpg

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Looks like industrial furnace slag to me. Any kind of old  factory nearby fit that?

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31 minutes ago, SPrice said:

Looks like industrial furnace slag to me. Any kind of old  factory nearby fit that?

Not so close to here, but it is possible brought this far somehow...  I guess your right about it.

Thank you.

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If it’s not magnetic that rules out magnetite. Try the magnetic test with the magnet hanging from a string to see if the piece is ferromagnetic.

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8 hours ago, JD1969 said:

If it’s not magnetic that rules out magnetite. Try the magnetic test with the magnet hanging from a string to see if the piece is ferromagnetic.

A minority of meteorites are not magnetic. I agree this looks like slag though.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's a link to identifying meteorites and meteor-wrongs.  Very good read with excellent pics of right and wrong samples. 

 

 https://www.clemson.edu/public/geomuseum/meteorites.html

 

The site says that meteorites are rarer than diamonds. I haven't found any diamonds but I have found meteorites. 

 

I have a small -baby food size - jar with meteorite pieces from a known location in Nevada, US. The site is Yelland Dry Lake Bed.  Most of the "good" pieces are long ago collected.  We got lucky when one of my daughters got tired and sat down after two hours of no luck finding anything. 

 

The dry lake bed is tan colored and the simple instructions to find the meteorites was -

1. look at every single rock on the lake bed.

2. if it sticks to a magnet it is a meteorite

3. no other magnetic rocks are found in that area.

4. the location is a strewn field - which means the meteor exploded in the air right above this dry lake bed which is 28 miles long and several miles wide

6. we followed the instructions and got lucky when she sat down in one spot and her magnet taped to a stick picked up a "rock" which was our first meteor-right!  I think we found 20 small pieces after we all joined her  in that area. 

 

Good luck with yours!

 

 

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On 5/5/2024 at 8:11 AM, SPrice said:

Here's a link to identifying meteorites and meteor-wrongs.  Very good read with excellent pics of right and wrong samples. 

 

 https://www.clemson.edu/public/geomuseum/meteorites.html

 

The site says that meteorites are rarer than diamonds. I haven't found any diamonds but I have found meteorites. 

 

I have a small -baby food size - jar with meteorite pieces from a known location in Nevada, US. The site is Yelland Dry Lake Bed.  Most of the "good" pieces are long ago collected.  We got lucky when one of my daughters got tired and sat down after two hours of no luck finding anything. 

 

The dry lake bed is tan colored and the simple instructions to find the meteorites was -

1. look at every single rock on the lake bed.

2. if it sticks to a magnet it is a meteorite

3. no other magnetic rocks are found in that area.

4. the location is a strewn field - which means the meteor exploded in the air right above this dry lake bed which is 28 miles long and several miles wide

6. we followed the instructions and got lucky when she sat down in one spot and her magnet taped to a stick picked up a "rock" which was our first meteor-right!  I think we found 20 small pieces after we all joined her  in that area. 

 

Good luck with yours!

 

 

 

Thank you for the link, very useful... now i know those are not meteorite for sure.

I also realized one of my old first rocks that i have found by accident is actually a rare Ureilite achondrite meteorite... not 100% sure thou. 

 

 

 

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I'm by no means an expert on this subject, but I can't even make a guess just judging by these photos. If I were you and really wanted to know for 100%, I would show this in person to your nearest meteorite expert.

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Greetings from the Lake of Constance. Roger

http://www.steinkern.de/

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17 hours ago, May3am said:

is actually a rare Ureilite achondrite meteorite.

Your piece does not look anything like the picture, wrong texture, wrong color.

Darwin said: " Man sprang from monkeys."

Will Rogers said: " Some of them didn't spring far enough."

 

My Fossil collection - My Mineral collection

My favorite thread on TFF.

 

 

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13 hours ago, ynot said:

Your piece does not look anything like the picture, wrong texture, wrong color.

It is the same piece, i just sand papered and polished some of it as you see.

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6 hours ago, May3am said:

It is the same piece, i just sand papered and polished some of it as you see.

Oh, my bad.

It is hard to see what is there as the majority of the pictures are backlit. The light source should be next too or behind the camera, not above or behind the object being photographed.

The first 2 pictures have good lighting, but different light sources. That causes a different appearance in the pictures, the first looks grey and the second looks black.

Darwin said: " Man sprang from monkeys."

Will Rogers said: " Some of them didn't spring far enough."

 

My Fossil collection - My Mineral collection

My favorite thread on TFF.

 

 

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On 5/14/2024 at 5:04 PM, ynot said:

Oh, my bad.

It is hard to see what is there as the majority of the pictures are backlit. The light source should be next too or behind the camera, not above or behind the object being photographed.

The first 2 pictures have good lighting, but different light sources. That causes a different appearance in the pictures, the first looks grey and the second looks black.

 

How about these under the sunlight.

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7 minutes ago, ynot said:

Much better pictures, thanks.

it could be a meteorite and you may want to contact a university expert.

 

Great... So it worth spending some cash on for further investigation?

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