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A Paleontologist You Admire Most


DE&i

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Alan Dawn was President of the Stamford and District Geological Society of which I belong and has been a great inspiration to practising amateur palaeontologists from around the area where I live.

Does anyone else admire a palaeontologist from there area perhaps someone who has fossil finds accredited to there name .

Edited by D&E

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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To name but a few:

Pierce Brodkorb

Larry Martin

Storrs Olson

Not from my geographic are, necessarily, but from my primary area of interest. :)

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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That's great were they people you had followed from the start of your journey into the world of fossils. I've just looked at those links very interesting careers indeed.

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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I admire all of the paleontologists here on the fossil forum, professional or armature, who generously share their knowledge with us openly and freely. :)

Edited by Rob Russell

Finding my way through life; one fossil at a time.

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my favs from personal experience are george phillips, paleo curator of the MS museum of natural science, frank garcia of bone valley and leisey shell pit fame, jean-louis latil the french ammonite guy and dr. martin röper, direktor of the Bürgermeister-Müller Museum at Solnhofen

Grüße,

Daniel A. Wöhr aus Südtexas

"To the motivated go the spoils."

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I admire all of the paleontologists here on the fossil forum, professional or armature, who generously share their knowledge with us openly and freely. :)

I totally agree I guess that's why we are all here, is there any particular palaeontologist of whose work you like.

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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my favs from personal experience are george phillips, paleo curator of the MS museum of natural science, frank garcia of bone valley and leisey shell pit fame, jean-louis latil the french ammonite guy and dr. martin röper, direktor of the Bürgermeister-Müller Museum at Solnhofen

You say from a personal experience, they have certainly pointed you in the right direction then.

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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all good guys, very knowledgeable, and fun to spend time with in the field.

Grüße,

Daniel A. Wöhr aus Südtexas

"To the motivated go the spoils."

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my favs from personal experience are george phillips, paleo curator of the MS museum of natural science, frank garcia of bone valley and leisey shell pit fame, jean-louis latil the french ammonite guy and dr. martin röper, direktor of the Bürgermeister-Müller Museum at Solnhofen

Frank's enthusiasm is difficult to match. He is also very outspoken and very appreciative of good people, and he's not afraid to let them know, either way. Dan and I (along with...7?...others) had the pleasure of hunting with him for a week last fall. It was one heck of an adventure. So, put Garcia at the top of my "influential amateur" list.

Also at the top of my influential list would have to be forum member, JPC. He has been very willing to answer various questions for me in-depth.

Of course, there are many others.

Edited by 32fordboy
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One more interesting thread you have opened, D&E!

I well appreciate all the local and foreign paleontologists I have been in contact with on my fossils to date.

Though, if just one reference is needed it undoubtedly goes to the great American man and scientist James C. Tyler of the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington

http://vertebrates.s...ages/tylerj.cfm

It was more than a year ago when I had asked for his opinion on a rare chilomycterus cf acanthodes pufferfish fossil I had found here in Crete.

The more I was impressed with from our extensive cooperation on that fossil was that after he had ended up to their concusions, this legend of Ichthyology had asked for my opinion on these conclusions!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The hole story was a great experience to me!!!!!!!

Astrinos P. Damianakis

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I concur with Missorian about R.C. Moore. In addition with being the father of the Treatise of Invertebrate Paleontology, he was the principal author of the college text used for many years for Paleontology, "Invertebrate Fossils", published in 1952 by McGraw Hill.

Of more recent Paleontologists I have the deepest regard and appreciation for Dr. Dick Zingula and Dr. Kenneth Hodgkinson who gave so generously of their time and knowledge in teaching fossil classes to the Paleontology Section of the Houston Gem and Mineral Society. Dr. Hodgkinson also authored several important papers on fossils of the Gulf Coast and Texas Eocene.

From a more historical perspective I salute the 19th century Paleontologist that have added so much to our knowledge. I especially like, Timothy Conrad, W.M. Gabb, Isaac Lea, also, Gilbert Harris, K.V.W. Palmer and Julia Gardner.

I wish I had personaly known Dr. Gilbert D. Harris.

Jim

The Eocene is my favorite

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A quick pause for thought:

When Leonardo Da Vinci was finding fossils (mostly Cenozoic molluscs) in his native northern Italy on top of mountains. And a burning desire to have questions answered i.e. how could they have got there who could he ask, I’m sure he would have consulted books scrolls etc. perhaps dating back a thousand years.

And now here we are same questions different era tapping into the knowledge of people here and now and to those we aspire to!

Fascinating...

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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For me the choice is Harry Whittington, regarded by his peers as one of the greatest trilobite experts of all time.

There are scores of accomplished trilobitologists but if I have to choose only one, then Uncle Harry wins easily. 2722.gif

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  • I found this Informative 1

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There were some young palaeontologist's put the area I grew up on the map whilst they were studying at Manchester by publishing papers on the local coal measure material... Lyall Anderson and Jason Dunlop have been very helpful over the years and inspirational in that their enthusiasm for their chiosen subject helps keep us motivated to look further...

Cheers Steve... And Welcome if your a New Member... :)

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Nice discussion you have going here! My favorite paleontologist would definitely have to be Roy Chapman Andrews. Known for a lot of his work in the Gobi during the early 1900's. He brought back some of the first identified dinosaur eggs! Pretty cool! People say the Indiana Jones character is based off of him. He wrote quite a few books too. My favorite is actually "Whale Hunting With Gun and Camera". Not even a book related to paleontology! :) He started out working on whaling boats learning about whales and photographing them. Actually brought back some of the first known photographs of whales. But if you would like a good biography of him I suggest reading "Dragon Hunter: Roy Chapman Andrews and the Asiatic Expeditions" by Charles Gallenkamp. And here is a good site for a quick read on him:

http://roychapmanand...hapman-andrews/

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Have you read "Under a Lucky Star"? LINK

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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I have always looked up to Gideon Mantell, William Buckland, Richard Owen and Mary Anning. Looking at more present people in the trade, David Ward is someone I admire. If all goes to plan I will be joining a hunt with him and a lot of others to Abbey Wood in search of London Clay shark teeth later in the year.

Regards,

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Thank you very much guys Roy Chapman Andrews is someone id never come across before sounds like a very interesting character. You’ve just opened another door for me and has now just been added to my book wish list.

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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David Ward is someone I admire. If all goes to plan I will be joining a hunt with him and a lot of others to Abbey Wood in search of London Clay shark teeth later in the year.

You are very lucky to hunt with David Ward to Abbey Wood ! I would have liked a lot participating in these searches. I believe to know that that occurs every year. I discussed in a period with him because I supplied him some recent shark and skate jaws.

I appreciate several of the cited names, but I have to think to quote names. The battle between Richard Owen and Marsh had impressed me when I was younger (I understand your avatar, Kosmoceras !). I always loved Stephen Jay Gould, and ... Indiana Jones ! :D

Coco

----------------------
TOOL TO MEASURE YOUR FOSSILS : here

My PDF library 1 (Recent & fossil fishes and selachians) : here
My PDF library 2 (Alive animals - without fishes and selacians) : here
Recent selachian jaws : here
Heterodontic and selachians : here
Recent Selachian Eggcases : here
Recent fish otoliths ! here

A Greg...

 

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You are very lucky to hunt with David Ward to Abbey Wood ! I would have liked a lot participating in these searches. I believe to know that that occurs every year. I discussed in a period with him because I supplied him some recent shark and skate jaws.

The TRG do yearly hunts to Abbey Wood and luckily a train into London is only half any hour. Costs a bit to fund the digger etc to get to the bed but worth it as you say!

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Also at the top of my influential list would have to be forum member, JPC. He has been very willing to answer various questions for me in-depth.

Of course, there are many others.

Wow... I am so flattered, Nick. Not sure what to say to that....but, cool. Feel free to keep asking...

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No need to be flattered. When you pay your dues to the fossil community, the respect is earned.

A professional paleontologist I'd like to mention here would be Rich White of the International Wildlife Museum. He does an excellent job of gracefully dealing with both pros and amateurs, which is a plus in my book. Hope he doesn't mind me tossing his name in the mix...

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Frank's enthusiasm is difficult to match. He is also very outspoken and very appreciative of good people, and he's not afraid to let them know, either way. Dan and I (along with...7?...others) had the pleasure of hunting with him for a week last fall. It was one heck of an adventure. So, put Garcia at the top of my "influential amateur" list.

Agree with Dan and Nick about Frank....

My personal favorite paleo man is Dan Woehr! :D

Edited by NatureGalTx
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