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Is Dimetrodon A True Dinosaur


DE&i

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While playing our usual, who can stack the plastic toy dinosaurs the highest with my son? And most of the time being defeated due to his special technique of putting two Diplodocuses back to back to give his stack some extra height.

I decide to pull out my ace and made a great stack equally matching his double Diplodocus by using a large sized Dimetrodon.

But was told, that’s cheating dad Dimetrodon is not a true Dinosaur.

Is he right?

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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He is absolutely correct! Bonus points. Dimetrodon lived in the Permian, before the dinos.

Score: Son 1, Dad 0

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It is a Permian Reptile.

Dinosaur:

From the Triassic, Jurrasic or Cretaceous. They cannot fly and are terrestrial.

This means that mosasaurs and pterosaurs are cretaceous reptiles, but not a dinosaurs.

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Dimetrodon is an honorary dinosaur. :)

You are indeed correct. Every kid raised in the '50s had a Dimetrodon included in his or her set of plastic dinosaurs. Of course they also threw in a "caveman" or two, as well as a "saber toothed tiger" and a woolly mammoth! Dimetrodon was my favorite.

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, also are remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. - Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See

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It's not just age - Dimetrodon is a synapsid, and is a closer relative to you and your son (you are both synapsids!)

Dinosaurs are diapsids...look up these terms on Wikipedia for a fun review

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It's not just age - Dimetrodon is a synapsid, and is a closer relative to you and your son (you are both synapsids!)

Dinosaurs are diapsids...look up these terms on Wikipedia for a fun review

yup...

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Every kid raised in the '50s had a Dimetrodon included in his or her set of plastic dinosaurs. Of course they also threw in a "caveman" or two, as well as a "saber toothed tiger" and a woolly mammoth!

Not just the 50s. You just described my set from the 70s to a tee!

And dude, your son is rocking it. Ask him what the correct name for Brontosaurus is. :rofl:

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You just got to give Dino stack a go especially with friends and a few beers. While on the subject of dinosauar lessons from children . Anyone know why you dont pronounce the p in pteranodon ive no idea how to explain the answer to my son .

Showed the answer to Dimetrodon to my son who replied , told you so!

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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... Anyone know why you dont pronounce the p in pteranodon ive no idea how to explain the answer to my son ...

It's derived from a greek root:

pter-, ptery-, pterid-, which means --> wing (pterygoid, Pteridophyta, Crossopterygii, Pterodactyl)

In Greek the 'p' is pronounced. It's primarily because english speakers have difficulty with the pronounciation that the 'p' has become silent for many greek suffixes. Throw a vowel in front of 'pt' and english speakers don't seem to mind the these consonants being adjacent: apterous, aptychi, even helicopter.

Edited by AgrilusHunter

"They ... savoured the strange warm glow of being much more ignorant than ordinary people, who were only ignorant of ordinary things."

-- Terry Pratchett

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Hi,

In France too, we pronounce "pt" :D (but we have more problems with "th"... = sssss, for example for "three")

Coco

----------------------
OUTIL POUR MESURER VOS FOSSILES : ici

Ma bibliothèque PDF 1 (Poissons et sélaciens récents & fossiles) : ici
Ma bibliothèque PDF 2 (Animaux vivants - sans poissons ni sélaciens) : ici
Mâchoires sélaciennes récentes : ici
Hétérodontiques et sélaciens : ici
Oeufs sélaciens récents : ici
Otolithes de poissons récents ! ici

Un Greg...

Badges-IPFOTH.jpg.f4a8635cda47a3cc506743a8aabce700.jpg Badges-MOTM.jpg.461001e1a9db5dc29ca1c07a041a1a86.jpg

 

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Not just the 50s. You just described my set from the 70s to a tee!

And dude, your son is rocking it. Ask him what the correct name for Brontosaurus is. :rofl:

Not just the 70s, they were still doing it in the 80's but they had added a creature that looked like a Nodosaur with a head that must have come from a Jim henson inspired creature.

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We had all these same dinos and non-dinos in our plastic collection in the 80s also. I don't know if they were ever claimed to be technically dinosaurs but the term was a catchall.

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Check 'em out! LINK

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Auspex, I enjoyed seeing those plastic renditions. A few years ago I purchased a huge box of plastic dinos off of eBay. They were a gift for a friend whose twin grandsons were soon to visit. When they arrived i was well pleased with the number and variety - but, they reeked of tobacco smoke. Into the tub they went for a scrub. They looked so beautiful floating there I snapped this shot. It still pops up in rotation on my screen saver. I loved the plastic ones as a kid. I guess I still do.

post-8873-0-23519600-1358480204_thumb.jpg

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, also are remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. - Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See

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Snolly, They are supposed to smell like that.

Ramo

LINK to image (copyright, you know).

(The caption is supposed to say "The real reason dinosaurs went extinct")

Edited by Auspex

For one species to mourn the death of another is a new thing under the sun.
-Aldo Leopold
 

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Ha! Good one!

Edited by AgrilusHunter

"They ... savoured the strange warm glow of being much more ignorant than ordinary people, who were only ignorant of ordinary things."

-- Terry Pratchett

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It's a good thing for Dimetrodon that Spinosaurus didn't enter the pop culture until recently. Otherwise, the stubby-legged synapsid would have been passed over for the sleek, sail-backed dinosaur. :)

Context is critical.

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Thanks to everyone for explaining the origins of the Dimetrodon and thanks to those who had explained how to pronounce pteranodon in English. My son no longer laughs at me as I stutter over that P. :P

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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For the game of Dino Stacking, you could institute a "wold card" rule. :)

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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I had a dream the other night that id invented this game called Dino Stack for all ages and it sold by the millions.

Keep them rules coming; I feel a patent coming on. ;)

Regards.....D&E&i

The only certainty with fossil hunting is the uncertainty.

https://lnk.bio/Darren.Withers

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I am always amazed at what children know. I spend a lot of spare time going into schools teaching children about what fossils tell us. I always have to be on guard, because if I get a fact wrong, especially about dinos, they will correct me.....Your son has a bright future in paleontology.....:>

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