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Dinosaur Tooth?


telligmant

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My coworker swears he found a dinosaur tooth in his back yard. We live in southern Indiana. Is it at all possible he actually has a tooth from a dinosaur? If so how could we tell?

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To the best of my knowledge Indiana is not a locale which typically yields dinosaur material. Other fossil remains are found there. A photo posted here of the mystery tooth would no doubt provide an answer.

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, also are remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. - Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See

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I'm gonna go out on a limb here,and say he probably found a Horn Coral.
Just a guess, but they can look kinda toothy to an untrained eye.
Like Snolly50 said, ...best to post some pics to be sure.
Regards,

EDIT: to add link.

Edited by Fossildude19

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

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I am going to agree with fossildude and bet on horn coral, which is likely to be found in Indiana. And I will take snolly's point one step further and argue that it is 99.9% certainly not a dinosaur tooth. here are a few things you can look for... does it have a shiny surface? Almost all teeth have an enamel surface which fossilizes into a shiny, usually dark veneer, and there is often a zone near the base (esp on a complete tooth) where the enamel is not there, so you can see a contrast between shiny enamel and lack thereof. Is the fossil quite conical.... dino teeth are not, but horn corals are.

that's your lesson for today... gotta go back to work....

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I am going to agree with fossildude and bet on horn coral, which is likely to be found in Indiana. And I will take snolly's point one step further and argue that it is 99.9% certainly not a dinosaur tooth. here are a few things you can look for... does it have a shiny surface? Almost all teeth have an enamel surface which fossilizes into a shiny, usually dark veneer, and there is often a zone near the base (esp on a complete tooth) where the enamel is not there, so you can see a contrast between shiny enamel and lack thereof. Is the fossil quite conical.... dino teeth are not, but horn corals are.

that's your lesson for today... gotta go back to work....

These guys are right.

A picture will confirm they're diagnosis..

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