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Brachiopod Hors D'oeuvre Tray


mikeymig

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I found this slab recently here in NY within a very large piece of shale that slid down from the side of a hill. The shale was pretty barren and I was about to give up on it when this one thin layer that was packed full of brachiopods showed itself to me. Its a nice size slab at 13.5" long and 11" high and about an inch thick. I was able to recover a few other smaller slabs from this layer but this was the prize. When I was carrying it back to my truck it felt like I was carrying a tray of hors d'oeuvres through the woods.

Mikey

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Many times I've wondered how much there is to know.  
led zeppelin

 

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Unusual to find a slab of brachiopods where one specie doesn't dominate. This is an awesome find!

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Mmmmm....where's the primordial fondue?

Grüße,

Daniel A. Wöhr aus Südtexas

"To the motivated go the spoils."

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Mmmmm....where's the primordial fondue?

I'll pass; brachiopods are inedible. ;)

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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I'll pass; brachiopods are inedible. ;)

Lingula are eaten in Thailand. I think it is the large pedicle that is eaten.

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Lingula are eaten in Thailand. I think it is the large pedicle that is eaten.

That is interesting! I know that the mantle and lophophore are (rather violently) inedible.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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What, no Ambocoelia? ;)

Seriously, Mikey, to have such a variety of nice, large brachiopods without the little ones seems mighty unusual to me. What a beautiful slab!

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No Ambocoelia but there are little Chonetes on it.

Many times I've wondered how much there is to know.  
led zeppelin

 

MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png IPFOTM.png IPFOTM2.png IPFOTM3.png IPFOTM4.png IPFOTM5.png

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Excellent display piece, Mikey! :wub:

Regards,

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg    VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png  VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015  

__________________________________________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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