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Bizarre Paleozoic Tooth Or Claw?


LanceH

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I have this bizarre fossil from 2007 that I still don't know what it is. It's surface is thin and it's filled with matrix (no boney core) so I'm think arthropod-ish but I don't know.

This is from the Graham Formation in Young County, Texas.

post-11-0-55692200-1413576853_thumb.jpg post-11-0-64879600-1413576854_thumb.jpg

post-11-0-67829800-1413576855_thumb.jpg post-11-0-85495300-1413576856_thumb.jpg

Edited by LanceH
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Phyllocarid jaw/mandible?

Regards,

Edited by Fossildude19
  • I found this Informative 1

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

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Awesome!

I see those critters are more known from the Devonian but do range higher into the Carboniferous. This one would be upper Pennsylvanian. I'm not sure if they are even documented in Texas Pennsylvanian.

Mine is not shaped exactly like the others seen online but it's close enough that it must be related.

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I did a Google search and it gave me sample pages from a book titled "Predator-Prey Interactions in the Fossil Record". There's a chapter discussing predator damage to Finis Shale ammonoids, nautiloids, and snails. Here's the interesting part:

3.7. A Hypothetical Predation Scenario

There are several kinds of predation scenarios that can be developed from this analysis. The Carboniferous predators that must be considered are sharks and other fish, arthropods (especially the phyllocarids), and other cephalopods.

Edited by LanceH
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I'd hate to run into a phyllocarid with mandibles that big. :o

Yeah, I was telling Roz that with mandibles that size it must have been pretty big like maybe 2 feet wide (just guessing). You would not want to put your finger near it's mouth :P

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It reminds me of a lungfish tooth. Some of them have the pitted texture that your fossil has.

That was my first impression.....but when I saw the underside ..I'm not sure what to make of it. But if your fossil came from formation around 300 million years old it could be a lungfish from that period. There were many different looking lungfish plates some small like the one in my avatar and as big as a hand ....so you need to send a photo of this fossil someone like Dr James Kirkland at the Utah Geological Survey or a museum that maybe able to ID this for you.

Edited by njfossilhunter

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Lungfish certainly makes a bit more sense, considering the size of the specimen.

Regards,

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg    VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png  VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015  

__________________________________________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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The only problem I have with lungfish is that the surface is thin and it appears to be filled with matrix indicating it was a hollow fossil and not boney inside.

I have this smaller one from similar age deposits but different locality:

post-11-0-15313100-1413726335_thumb.jpg

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The only problem I have with lungfish is that the surface is thin and it appears to be filled with matrix indicating it was a hollow fossil and not boney inside.

The depositional environment could have been not favorable for preservation of bone.

I can't quite tell in the photos.... Are there signs of surface wear?

Context is critical.

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