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Please Help Me Identify This


Hazelnut

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This was found in south east Idaho in an old glacer lake. Found on the surface level with shale and other rocks. Not sure if this is a rock or a fossil.

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post-16919-0-57948300-1415836337_thumb.jpg

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Sorry, but I am only seeing a rock here.

Regards,

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

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Hi and welcome to the forum. I agree with fossildude that this is simply a rock.

A fossil hunter needs sharp eyes and a keen search image, a mental template that subconsciously evaluates everything he sees in his search for telltale clues. -Richard E. Leakey

http://prehistoricalberta.lefora.com

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But it is not a simple rock; It looks like it's been through a lot!

Is this as you found it?

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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It looks similar to a slick & slide, which is a rock that was at the boundary of a moving fault line. From what you say about it's location, I'll guess a dislodged piece of bedrock which has been glacially shaved.

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Sorry, but I am only seeing a rock here.

There are probably guys over in the Geology ID section who are saying "Sorry, it is just a fossil, I don't see a rock here." :)

It is a geologically interesting piece. I have no explanation. Curious.

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This is how I found it. I have been told it's not a rock or a gem... I had an archeologist look at it too. .. when I look up what I have been told it looks like, it never looks like the pictures? Any idea what other type of rock this may be?

Edited by Hazelnut
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What were you told that it is? what did you look up?

It doesn't seem to be a fossil. I was just kidding in my post above. The first picture surface looks like it has been scraped flat by ice sheet motion.

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It is an interesting rock. All fossils are rocks (unless they have not been replaced) but all rocks are not fossils. :)

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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Whoever told you that it's not a rock is wrong.

Perhaps the suggestion was that it is not a discrete mineral?

The word is oft confused with 'rock'.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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It looks to me like a piece of fractured clastic turbidite (also known as "rock" ;) ) with a thick weathering crust. Look closely at the frond-like swirls in the middle picture. Those patterns are very typical of sedimentary rocks formed in that way (fluid movement of sediments). The basin to the north of the Snake River Plain ocupying a large part of Idaho is deeply filled with rock composed of sediments of that kind and the western part of the plain is a huge tectonic graben (rift valley) where the strata have been depressed by "downfaulting". That could easily explain the unusually flat surface. Those kinds of processes can produce completely straight breakage surfaces which are close to vertical compared to any horizontal bedding planes in the rock.

Edited by painshill
  • I found this Informative 2

Roger

I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew);Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who [Rudyard Kipling]

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these type of sediments are not all that uncommon.

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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these type of sediments are not all that uncommon.

They are in Florida. :)

My son mostly grew up in an area of Florida that is totally sand. When he would go on trips he was amazed that there were rocks everywhere, and wondered who put them there.

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That would certainly be uncommon in for Florida for sure. :D

Edited by Herb

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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